Mumford's famous "Red Book" gives a simple, readable account of the basic objects of algebraic geometry, preserving as much as possible their geometric flavor and integrating this with the tools of commutative algebra. It is aimed at graduates or mathematicians in other fields wishing to quickly learn aboutalgebraic geometry. This new edition includes an appendix that gives an overview of the theory of curves, their moduli spaces and their Jacobians -- one of the most exciting fields within algebraic geometry.
This reference serves as a reader-friendly guide to every basic tool and skill required in the mathematical library and helps mathematicians find resources in any format in the mathematics literature. It lists a wide range of standard texts, journals, review articles, newsgroups, and Internet and database tools for every major subfield in mathematics and details methods of access to primary literature sources of new research, applications, results, and techniques. Using the Mathematics Literature is the most comprehensive and up-to-date resource on mathematics literature in both print and electronic formats, presenting time-saving strategies for retrieval of the latest information.
This is a relatively fast paced graduate level introduction to complex algebraic geometry, from the basics to the frontier of the subject. It covers sheaf theory, cohomology, some Hodge theory, as well as some of the more algebraic aspects of algebraic geometry. The author frequently refers the reader if the treatment of a certain topic is readily available elsewhere but goes into considerable detail on topics for which his treatment puts a twist or a more transparent viewpoint. His cases of exploration and are chosen very carefully and deliberately. The textbook achieves its purpose of taking new students of complex algebraic geometry through this a deep yet broad introduction to a vast subject, eventually bringing them to the forefront of the topic via a non-intimidating style.
The second volume of the Geometry of Algebraic Curves is devoted to the foundations of the theory of moduli of algebraic curves. Its authors are research mathematicians who have actively participated in the development of the Geometry of Algebraic Curves. The subject is an extremely fertile and active one, both within the mathematical community and at the interface with the theoretical physics community. The approach is unique in its blending of algebro-geometric, complex analytic and topological/combinatorial methods. It treats important topics such as Teichmüller theory, the cellular decomposition of moduli and its consequences and the Witten conjecture. The careful and comprehensive presentation of the material is of value to students who wish to learn the subject and to experts as a reference source. The first volume appeared 1985 as vol. 267 of the same series.
This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the theory of separable algebras over commutative rings. After a thorough introduction to the general theory, the fundamental roles played by separable algebras are explored. For example, Azumaya algebras, the henselization of local rings, and Galois theory are rigorously introduced and treated. Interwoven throughout these applications is the important notion of étale algebras. Essential connections are drawn between the theory of separable algebras and Morita theory, the theory of faithfully flat descent, cohomology, derivations, differentials, reflexive lattices, maximal orders, and class groups. The text is accessible to graduate students who have finished a first course in algebra, and it includes necessary foundational material, useful exercises, and many nontrivial examples.
Algebraic Geometry has been at the center of much of mathematics for hundreds of years. It is not an easy field to break into, despite its humble beginnings in the study of circles, ellipses, hyperbolas, and parabolas. This text consists of a series of ex
Coverage includes foundational material as well as current research, authored by top specialists within their fields.
This book is a general introduction to the theory of schemes, followed by applications to arithmetic surfaces and to the theory of reduction of algebraic curves. The first part introduces basic objects such as schemes, morphisms, base change, local properties (normality, regularity, Zariski's Main Theorem). This is followed by the more global aspect: coherent sheaves and a finiteness theorem for their cohomology groups. Then follows a chapter on sheaves of differentials, dualizing sheaves, and Grothendieck's duality theory. The first part ends with the theorem of Riemann-Roch and its application to the study of smooth projective curves over a field. Singular curves are treated through a detailed study of the Picard group. The second part starts with blowing-ups and desingularisation (embedded or not) of fibered surfaces over a Dedekind ring that leads on to intersection theory on arithmetic surfaces. Castelnuovo's criterion is proved and also the existence of the minimal regular model. This leads to the study of reduction of algebraic curves. The case of elliptic curves is studied in detail. The book concludes with the funadmental theorem of stable reduction of Deligne-Mumford. The book is essentially self-contained, including the necessary material on commutative algebra. The prerequisites are therefore few, and the book should suit a graduate student. It contains many examples and nearly 600 exercises.
This monograph is a bridge between the classical theory and modern approach via arithmetic geometry.
Grothendieck’s beautiful theory of schemes permeates modern algebraic geometry and underlies its applications to number theory, physics, and applied mathematics. This simple account of that theory emphasizes and explains the universal geometric concepts behind the definitions. In the book, concepts are illustrated with fundamental examples, and explicit calculations show how the constructions of scheme theory are carried out in practice.
These lectures, delivered by Professor Mumford at Harvard in 1963-1964, are devoted to a study of properties of families of algebraic curves, on a non-singular projective algebraic curve defined over an algebraically closed field of arbitrary characteristic. The methods and techniques of Grothendieck, which have so changed the character of algebraic geometry in recent years, are used systematically throughout. Thus the classical material is presented from a new viewpoint.
The classification of algebraic surfaces is an intricate and fascinating branch of mathematics, developed over more than a century and still an active area of research today. In this book, Professor Beauville gives a lucid and concise account of the subject, expressed simply in the language of modern topology and sheaf theory, and accessible to any budding geometer. A chapter on preliminary material ensures that this volume is self-contained while the exercises succeed both in giving the flavor of the classical subject, and in equipping the reader with the techniques needed for research. The book is aimed at graduate students in geometry and topology.
This book, based on lectures presented in courses on algebraic geometry taught by the author at Purdue University, is intended for engineers and scientists (especially computer scientists), as well as graduate students and advanced undergraduates in mathematics. In addition to providing a concrete or algorithmic approach to algebraic geometry, the author also attempts to motivate and explain its link to more modern algebraic geometry based on abstract algebra.The book covers various topics in the theory of algebraic curves and surfaces, such as rational and polynomial parametrization, functions and differentials on a curve, branches and valuations, and resolution of singularities. The emphasis is on presenting heuristic ideas and suggestive arguments rather than formal proofs. Readers will gain new insight into the subject of algebraic geometry in a way that should increase appreciation of modern treatments of the subject, as well as enhance its utility in applications in science and industry.
The first of two volumes offering a modern introduction to Kaehlerian geometry and Hodge structure. The book starts with basic material on complex variables, complex manifolds, holomorphic vector bundles, sheaves and cohomology theory, the latter being treated in a more theoretical way than is usual in geometry. The author then proves the Kaehler identities, which leads to the hard Lefschetz theorem and the Hodge index theorem. The book culminates with the Hodge decomposition theorem. The meanings of these results are investigated in several directions. Completely self-contained, the book is ideal for students, while its content gives an account of Hodge theory and complex algebraic geometry as has been developed by P. Griffiths and his school, by P. Deligne, and by S. Bloch. The text is complemented by exercises which provide useful results in complex algebraic geometry.
Let me begin with a little history. In the 20th century, algebraic geometry has gone through at least 3 distinct phases. In the period 1900-1930, largely under the leadership of the 3 Italians, Castelnuovo, Enriques and Severi, the subject grew immensely. In particular, what the late 19th century had done for curves, this period did for surfaces: a deep and systematic theory of surfaces was created. Moreover, the links between the "synthetic" or purely "algebro-geometric" techniques for studying surfaces, and the topological and analytic techniques were thoroughly explored. However the very diversity of tools available and the richness of the intuitively appealing geometric picture that was built up, led this school into short-cutting the fine details of all proofs and ignoring at times the time consuming analysis of special cases (e. g. , possibly degenerate configurations in a construction). This is the traditional difficulty of geometry, from High School Euclidean geometry on up. In the period 1930-1960, under the leadership of Zariski, Weil, and (towards the end) Grothendieck, an immense program was launched to introduce systematically the tools of commutative algebra into algebraic geometry and to find a common language in which to talk, for instance, of projective varieties over characteristic p fields as well as over the complex numbers. In fact, the goal, which really goes back to Kronecker, was to create a "geometry" incorporating at least formally arithmetic as well as projective geo metry.
Fully refereed international journal dealing with all aspects of geometry and topology and their applications.
This short and readable introduction to algebraic geometry will be ideal for all undergraduate mathematicians coming to the subject for the first time.
Shafarevich's Basic Algebraic Geometry has been a classic and universally used introduction to the subject since its first appearance over 40 years ago. As the translator writes in a prefatory note, ``For all [advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate] students, and for the many specialists in other branches of math who need a liberal education in algebraic geometry, Shafarevich’s book is a must.'' The second volume is in two parts: Book II is a gentle cultural introduction to scheme theory, with the first aim of putting abstract algebraic varieties on a firm foundation; a second aim is to introduce Hilbert schemes and moduli spaces, that serve as parameter spaces for other geometric constructions. Book III discusses complex manifolds and their relation with algebraic varieties, Kähler geometry and Hodge theory. The final section raises an important problem in uniformising higher dimensional varieties that has been widely studied as the ``Shafarevich conjecture''. The style of Basic Algebraic Geometry 2 and its minimal prerequisites make it to a large extent independent of Basic Algebraic Geometry 1, and accessible to beginning graduate students in mathematics and in theoretical physics.

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