An almanac presenting facts and statistics on Texas government, history, sports, environment, education, business, agriculture, and more.
First published in 1857, the Texas Almanac has a long history of chronicling the Lone Star State and its residents. The Almanac's 66th edition is printed in full color and includes hundreds of photographs from every region of the state. Color maps of the state and each of its 254 counties show relief, major and minor roads, waterways, parks, and other attractions. Each county map is accompanied by a profile outlining that county's history, physical features, recreation, population, and economy. Special features in the 66th Edition include: • An article on the birth of the Austin music scene and the influence on it by legendary musician Willie Nelson, written by Nelson biographer Joe Nick Patoski. The Austin music scene is recognized worldwide through Austin City Limits, the longest running music program on American television. • A history of the Civil War in Texas to mark the 150th year since the beginning of that conflict. Composed by Texana writer Mike Cox, the article highlights the unique aspects of the war in Texas, such as the Great Hanging at Gainesville and the Battle of Palmito Ranch. • Newly released 2010 population figures. • A complete history of voter turnout in Texas going back to 1866. • A history of professional football in Texas. • Comprehensive lists of high school football and basketball championships, Texas Olympians, and Texas Sports Hall of Fame inductees. The Texas Almanac 2012–2013 includes articles and data about: • history and government • population and demographics • the natural environment • sports and recreation • business and transportation • oil and minerals • agriculture • science and health • education • culture and the arts • obituaries of notable Texans • pronunciation guide to town and county names
For twenty years the Historical Atlas of Texas stood as a trusted resource for students and aficionados of the state. Now this key reference has been thoroughly updated and expanded—and even rechristened. Texas: A Historical Atlas more accurately reflects the Lone Star State at the dawn of the twenty-first century. Its 86 entries feature 175 newly designed maps—more than twice the number in the original volume—illustrating the most significant aspects of the state’s history, geography, and current affairs. The heart of the book is its wealth of historical information. Sections devoted to indigenous peoples of Texas and its exploration and settlement offer more than 45 entries with visual depictions of everything from the routes of Spanish explorers to empresario grants to cattle trails. In another 31 articles, coverage of modern and contemporary Texas takes in hurricanes and highways, power plants and population trends. Practically everything about this atlas is new. All of the essays have been updated to reflect recent scholarship, while more than 30 appear for the first time, addressing such subjects as the Texas Declaration of Independence, early roads, slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, Texas-Oklahoma boundary disputes, and the tideland oil controversy. A dozen new entries for “Contemporary Texas” alone chart aspects of industry, agriculture, and minority demographics. Nearly all of the expanded essays are accompanied by multiple maps—everyone in full color. The most comprehensive, state-of-the-art work of its kind, Texas: A Historical Atlas is more than just a reference. It is a striking visual introduction to the Lone Star State.
Authors Louise S. O'Connor and Cecilia Thompson present a simple encyclopedic study of the Trans-Pecos area of Texas with emphasis on Presidio County VICTORIA, Texas — In their quest to complete their study and to share a better knowledge and understanding of a part of Texas that is still somewhat a frontier, authors Louise S. O'Connor and Cecilia Thompson reveal the first volume of their book "Marfa and Presidio County, Texas: A Social, Economic, and Cultural Study 1937 to 2008 Volume One, 1937 - 1989." In a book that offers a closer look at the past and the present, readers will see how a place known as a tourist area and a center of contemporary art came to be. It returns to the pre-historic era of Far West Texas and bring readers up to the present with yearly reports on the region as well as extensive formal research and personal interviews with present day people who live in Presidio County. A case study worth reading, this book is an eye-opener for a better understanding of how this small yet historically rich land is what it is now. Packed with the economic, social, and cultural history of Presidio County; this book gives readers, both lay and the historians, a clear and complete picture of the events that lead to the preservation, industrialization, and the improvement of one of the frontiers of the United States of America.
A century after the first wave of Hispanic settlement in Houston, the city has come to be known as the “Hispanic mecca of Texas.” Arnoldo De León’s classic study of Hispanic Houston, now updated to cover recent developments and encompass a decade of additional scholarship, showcases the urban experience for Sunbelt Mexican Americans. De León focuses on the development of the barrios in Texas’ largest city from the 1920s to the present. Following the generational model, he explores issues of acculturation and identity formation across political and social eras. This contribution to community studies, urban history, and ethnic studies was originally published in 1989 by the Center for Mexican American Studies at the University of Houston. With the Center’s cooperation, it is now available again for a new generation of scholars.
THE CHALLENGE OF DEMOCRACY, TEXAS EDITION, is highly acclaimed for the non-ideological framework it uses to explore the three themes of freedom, order, and equality as political values; the majoritarianism vs. pluralism debate; and globalization's effect on American politics. Bringing students the very latest research and events central to the field of American Government and Texas Politics, the Tenth Edition has been extensively updated and includes new examples, figures, data, and current discussions. The authors also include a balanced retrospective of the Bush presidency as well as new comparative features that place the United States in a global context. Throughout, the text challenges students to sharpen their critical thinking skills, compare and contrast U.S. policy with other countries, contemplate future trends, and put their new knowledge into political action. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Along with the settlement of the Texas frontier came rustlers, public drunks, gunfighters, and other outlaws. A jail in which to incarcerate the lawbreakers was thus often the first public building raised in a new town. Later, as government developed, public buildings—notably county courthouses and jails—assumed not only practical but also symbolic importance. The architecture of these buildings in the nineteenth century reflected the power and status with which the community imbued the government; many of the same architects applied the aesthetic standards of the day to both. In later years, the safety and at least limited comfort of the prisoners became concerns and jails were remodeled or abandoned to other uses in favor of modern, more utilitarian structures. In this heavily illustrated guide to the historic county jails of Texas, Ed Blackburn Jr. takes readers to each of the 254 counties in the state, presenting brief histories and of the counties and their structures that housed their criminals. He provides general information about the architecture and location of the buildings and, when possible, describes the present uses of those that have been decommissioned. Interviews with local officials, historians, and newspaper publishers have yielded colorful anecdotes for many of the jails. Revealing photographs of many of the old jails have been gathered from local and archival sources, and Blackburn himself has taken pictures of extant buildings. Together, these words and images not only provide a survey of the way Texans have housed their criminals, but also, with the aid of thumbnail maps of county locations, offer residents and tourists throughout the state a guide to a fascinating aspect of architectural and cultural history.
This reference book serves as a cumulative historical information source on the legislature and as a guide for state and local governments and for individual citizens and groups having an interest in the legislative process.
Reviews the previous year's major and minor league baseball season and includes complete statistics and a summary of college and amateur baseball.
Reviews the previous year's major and minor league baseball season and includes complete statistics and a summary of college and amateur baseball.
The Weather Almanac, 12th Edition is a resource for a variety of climate and meteorological data including both domestic and international weather trends, historical weather patterns dating back 1000 years, natural disasters, and a 20 page glossary of weather terminology. The book is complete with detailed maps, pictures, and tables compiling climate data from a variety of sources, including the National Weather Service and the US Geological Survey. Separate sections in The Weather Almanac are devoted to tornadoes, hurricanes, thunderstorms, and lightening, flash floods, and winter storms, and they have been edited from official reports by governmental agencies. The new edition has been updated to include recent disasters such as the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami that devastated Indonesia as well as 2005’s Hurricane Katrina. These chapters serve as a basic reference for severe weather and extreme conditions, which can assist in preparing for a weather emergency.
A Guide for using with "Holes" The Stephens Library has multiple copies of the novel for use with a small group. Suitable for Upper primary or Lower secondary.
Get accurate weather and earthquake forecasts for all U.S. zones year round, plus economic predictions, monthly lunar horoscopes, and more. Includes a gardening almanac. Illustrations.
ESPN has taken the original Information Please Sports Almanac, known for its thorough stats, compelling facts, and commentary, and added ESPN's unique voice, point of view, and contributions of network personalities. Taking on the witty "quick-hits" tone ESPN is famous for, the new ESPN almanac includes "Inside the Numbers" statistics, expanded quotes, rule changes, ESPN coverage of the top 40 stories and personalities of the year--with continued annual coverage of college, pro, international and Olympic Sports, bizarre sports occurrences, Hall of Fame awards, Who's Who, parks and arenas, business and media, plus much, much more.
In Why Texans Fought in the Civil War, Charles David Grear provides insights into what motivated Texans to fight for the Confederacy. Mining important primary sources—including thousands of letters and unpublished journals—he affords readers the opportunity to hear, often in the combatants’ own words, why it was so important to them to engage in tumultuous struggles occurring so far from home. As Grear notes, in the decade prior to the Civil War the population of Texas had tripled. The state was increasingly populated by immigrants from all parts of the South and foreign countries. When the war began, it was not just Texas that many of these soldiers enlisted to protect, but also their native states, where they had family ties.

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