An almanac presenting facts and statistics on Texas government, history, sports, environment, education, business, agriculture, and more.
Provides statistical information about Texas such as government, economic, educational, business, agricultural, religious and cultural.
FEATURES OF THE TEXAS ALMANAC 2014–2015 • Sketches of eight historic ranches of Texas by Texana writer Mike Cox. • Article on the Texas art and artists by Houston businessman and art collector J.P. Bryan, who has amassed the world’s largest Texana collection. • Coverage of the 2012 elections, redistricting, and the 2012 Texas Olympic medalists. • An update on Major League Baseball in Texas. • Lists of sports champions — high school, college, and professional. MAJOR SECTIONS UPDATED FOR EACH EDITION • The Environment, including geology, plant life, wildlife, rivers, and lakes. • Weather highlights of the previous two years, plus a list of destructive weather dating from 1766. • Two-year Astronomical Calendar that shows moon phases, times of sunrise and sunset, moonrise and moonset, eclipses, and meteor showers. • Recreation, with details on state and national parks and forests, landmarks, and fairs and festivals. • Sports, including lists of high school football and basketball champions, professional sports teams, Texas Olympians, and Texas Sports Hall of Fame inductees. • Counties section, with detailed county maps and profiles for Texas’s 254 counties. • Population figures from the 2010 US Census and State Data Center estimates as of 2012. • Comprehensive list of Texas Cities and Towns. • Politics, Elections, and information on Federal, State, and Local Governments. • Culture and the Arts, including a list of civic and religious Holidays. • Religion census of 2010 by denomination and adherents; breakdown on metro areas and counties. • Health and Science, with charts of vital statistics. • Education, including a complete list of colleges and universities, and UIL results. • Business and Transportation, with an expanded section on Oil and Gas. • Agriculture, including data on production of crops, fruits, vegetables, livestock, and dairy. • Obituaries of notable Texans. • Pronunciation Guide to Texas town and county names.
The Texas Almanac 2018–2019 includes these new feature articles: • WATER — An in-depth overview of the state of water in Texas, written by conservationist Dr. Andrew Sansom. Author of the acclaimed book Water in Texas, Dr. Sansom provides compelling new information in this Almanac article. A former executive director of both the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Nature Conservancy, he has won many awards for managing and protecting natural resources and currently is Research Professor of Geography and Executive Director of The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State University. “No natural resource has greater significance for the future of Texas than water. In Texas, the population is expected to essentially double in the next generation and yet we have already given permission for more water to be drawn from many of our rivers than is actually in them.” • HUNTING — A look at the popularity of hunting in Texas by Luke Clayton, a longtime outdoors writer, radio host, and book author. Clayton, who grew up hunting and fishing in rural northeast Texas, also discusses the overpopulation problem of wild hogs and provides his favorite recipes for all types of wild game. A prolific voice for hunters, Clayton hosts three weekly outdoors radio shows, writes a weekly hunting and fishing column that appears in more than 30 newspapers, and writes for magazines, such as Texas Parks & Wildlife magazine and Texas Wildlife. “After spending about 55 years in the pursuit of fish and game all over this country and several others, I have come to the conclusion that some people are born to hunt and some are not, but that spark of DNA passed down through the eons from our hunting forefathers is alive in all of us.” • SPORTSWOMEN — Cookbook author and food editor Dotty Griffith writes about women who love both hunting and fishing, and she offers up a few of her favorite recipes. “I grew up in a hunting and fishing family. Not every woman is that lucky but that's no reason not to learn how. More women are getting into outdoor sports on their own, not as tag-alongs. From equipment to fashion, women are becoming a force in what used to be almost exclusively a man's world.” • FISHING — Fishing guide and expert Kevin “K.T.” Townsend writes about angling in Texas. Townsend is the author of the online blog K.T. Diaries and gives an overview of both saltwater and freshwater fishing from the Gulf Coast to the state’s many rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. “I can still remember fishing with my grandfather, who became a guide after taking early retirement. He would put me in the front of his john boat with a cane pole. . . . It seemed like we filled up the fish basket on every trip.” MAJOR SECTIONS UPDATED FOR EACH EDITION An illustrated History of the Lone Star State. The Environment, including geology, plant life, wildlife, rivers, lakes. Weather highlights of the previous two years, plus a list of destructive weather dating from 1766. Two-year Astronomical Calendar showing moon phases, sunrise and sunset, moonrise and moonset, eclipses, and meteor showers. Recreation, with details on state and national parks, landmarks, and wildlife refuges. Sports, including lists of high school football and basketball champions, professional sports teams, Texas Olympians, and Texas Sports Hall of Fame inductees. Counties, an expansive section featuring detailed county maps, locator maps, and profiles of Texas’ 254 counties. Population figures and the latest estimates from the State Data Center. Comprehensive list of Texas cities and towns. Politics, Elections, and information on Federal, State, and Local governments. Culture and the Arts, including a list of civic and religious Holidays. Health and Science, with charts of vital statistics. Education, including a complete list of colleges and universities, and UIL results. Business and Transportation, with an expanded section on Oil and Gas. Agriculture, including data on production of crops, fruits, vegetables, livestock, and dairy. Obituaries of notable Texans. A Pronunciation Guide to Texas town and county names.
For twenty years the Historical Atlas of Texas stood as a trusted resource for students and aficionados of the state. Now this key reference has been thoroughly updated and expanded—and even rechristened. Texas: A Historical Atlas more accurately reflects the Lone Star State at the dawn of the twenty-first century. Its 86 entries feature 175 newly designed maps—more than twice the number in the original volume—illustrating the most significant aspects of the state’s history, geography, and current affairs. The heart of the book is its wealth of historical information. Sections devoted to indigenous peoples of Texas and its exploration and settlement offer more than 45 entries with visual depictions of everything from the routes of Spanish explorers to empresario grants to cattle trails. In another 31 articles, coverage of modern and contemporary Texas takes in hurricanes and highways, power plants and population trends. Practically everything about this atlas is new. All of the essays have been updated to reflect recent scholarship, while more than 30 appear for the first time, addressing such subjects as the Texas Declaration of Independence, early roads, slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, Texas-Oklahoma boundary disputes, and the tideland oil controversy. A dozen new entries for “Contemporary Texas” alone chart aspects of industry, agriculture, and minority demographics. Nearly all of the expanded essays are accompanied by multiple maps—everyone in full color. The most comprehensive, state-of-the-art work of its kind, Texas: A Historical Atlas is more than just a reference. It is a striking visual introduction to the Lone Star State.
Authors Louise S. O'Connor and Cecilia Thompson present a simple encyclopedic study of the Trans-Pecos area of Texas with emphasis on Presidio County VICTORIA, Texas — In their quest to complete their study and to share a better knowledge and understanding of a part of Texas that is still somewhat a frontier, authors Louise S. O'Connor and Cecilia Thompson reveal the first volume of their book "Marfa and Presidio County, Texas: A Social, Economic, and Cultural Study 1937 to 2008 Volume One, 1937 - 1989." In a book that offers a closer look at the past and the present, readers will see how a place known as a tourist area and a center of contemporary art came to be. It returns to the pre-historic era of Far West Texas and bring readers up to the present with yearly reports on the region as well as extensive formal research and personal interviews with present day people who live in Presidio County. A case study worth reading, this book is an eye-opener for a better understanding of how this small yet historically rich land is what it is now. Packed with the economic, social, and cultural history of Presidio County; this book gives readers, both lay and the historians, a clear and complete picture of the events that lead to the preservation, industrialization, and the improvement of one of the frontiers of the United States of America.
Along with the settlement of the Texas frontier came rustlers, public drunks, gunfighters, and other outlaws. A jail in which to incarcerate the lawbreakers was thus often the first public building raised in a new town. Later, as government developed, public buildings—notably county courthouses and jails—assumed not only practical but also symbolic importance. The architecture of these buildings in the nineteenth century reflected the power and status with which the community imbued the government; many of the same architects applied the aesthetic standards of the day to both. In later years, the safety and at least limited comfort of the prisoners became concerns and jails were remodeled or abandoned to other uses in favor of modern, more utilitarian structures. In this heavily illustrated guide to the historic county jails of Texas, Ed Blackburn Jr. takes readers to each of the 254 counties in the state, presenting brief histories and of the counties and their structures that housed their criminals. He provides general information about the architecture and location of the buildings and, when possible, describes the present uses of those that have been decommissioned. Interviews with local officials, historians, and newspaper publishers have yielded colorful anecdotes for many of the jails. Revealing photographs of many of the old jails have been gathered from local and archival sources, and Blackburn himself has taken pictures of extant buildings. Together, these words and images not only provide a survey of the way Texans have housed their criminals, but also, with the aid of thumbnail maps of county locations, offer residents and tourists throughout the state a guide to a fascinating aspect of architectural and cultural history.
A compilation of practical advice and folklore features weather forecasts for the United States, planting tables, health remedies, horoscopes, recipes, games and puzzles, and other entertaining and useful information.
Albert Nofi tells the story of the American War through a range of insightful essays, anecdotes, and facts. Did you know... • During the final days of the war, some Richmond citizens would throw “Starvation Parties,” at which elegantly attired guests would gather at soirees where the finest silver and crystal tableware was used, though there were usually no refreshments except water. • Union Rear-Admiral Goldsborough was nicknamed “Old Guts”, not so much for his combativeness as for his heft, weighing about 300 pounds, and was described as “. . . a huge mass of inert matter.” • 30.6 percent of the 425 Confederate generals, but only 21.6 percent of the 583 Union generals, had been lawyers before the war. • In 1861, J. P. Morgan made a huge profit by buying 5,000 condemned US Army carbines and selling them back to another arsenal, taking the Army to court when they tried to refuse to pay for the faulty weapons. • Major General Loring was reputed to have so rich a vocabulary than one of the men once remarked he could "curse a cannon up hill without horses." • Many militia units had a favorite drink, the Charleston Light Dragoons’ punch took around a week to make while the Chatham Artillery required 1 pound of green tea leaves be steeped overnight. • There were five living former presidents when the Civil War began, and seven veterans of the war (plus one draft dodger) went on to serve as President.
This reference book serves as a cumulative historical information source on the legislature and as a guide for state and local governments and for individual citizens and groups having an interest in the legislative process.
Reviews the previous year's major and minor league baseball season and includes complete statistics and a summary of college and amateur baseball.
Presents data concering rice and rice production around the world.
The World Factbook provides information on the history, people, government, economy, geography, communications, transportation, military, and transnational issues for 267 world entities. The World Factbook is prepared by the Central Intelligence Agency. Comprehensive guide full of facts, maps, flags, and detailed information. A must for travellers, businessmen, politicians, and all who wants to know more about our fascinating world. -- We share these facts with the people of all nations in the belief that knowledge of the truth underpins the functioning of free societies (From official webpage). Tags: world, guide, facts, almanach
First published in Galveston, this 60th edition is the one-stop, comprehensive reference book for all things Texan.
Offers facts on a range of topics, from animals to weather and from computers to sports.
More than any other sport, baseball has developed its own niche in America’s culture and psyche. Some researchers spend years on detailed statistical analyses of minute parts of the game, while others wax poetic about its players and plays. Many trace the beginnings of the civil rights movement in part to the Major Leagues’ decision to integrate, and the words and phrases of the game (for example, pinch-hitter and out in left field) have become common in our everyday language. From AARON, HENRY onward, this book covers all of what might be called the cultural aspects of baseball (as opposed to the number-rich statistical information so widely available elsewhere). Biographical sketches of all Hall of Fame players, owners, executives and umpires, as well as many of the sportswriters and broadcasters who have won the Spink and Frick awards, join entries for teams, owners, commissioners and league presidents. Advertising, agents, drafts, illegal substances, minor leagues, oldest players, perfect games, retired uniform numbers, superstitions, tripleheaders, and youngest players are among the thousands of entries herein. Most entries open with a topical quote and conclude with a brief bibliography of sources for further research. The whole work is exhaustively indexed and includes over 120 photographs.

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