Selected as a Book of the Year 2016 in the Daily Telegraph With 100 recipes that use wholesome grains from oats to amaranth this delicious cookbook spans classic breakfast porridges, through lunchtime salad bowls to nourishing dinners. Taking inspiration from Nordic cooking and the Danish ethos of hygge, Alex creates delicious, simple dishes which are both satisfying and healthy.
Selected as a Book of the Year 2016 in the Daily Telegraph With 100 recipes that use wholesome grains from oats to amaranth this delicious cookbook spans classic breakfast porridges, through lunchtime salad bowls to nourishing dinners. Taking inspiration from Nordic cooking and the Danish ethos of hygge, Alex creates delicious, simple dishes which are both satisfying and healthy.
A long-overdue cookbook that takes whole grains from "good for you" side dish to sophisticated and satisfying main course. We all know that choosing whole grains over processed ingredients is better for our health, yet the likes of millet, quinoa, and barley are still stuck on the culinary sidelines. Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough bring these unheralded culinary superstars to the center of the plate, with more than 100 recipes showing that their range of textures and flavors is greater than any other food group, they're incredibly versatile, they're economical, and they can anchor a meal. Readers will be surprised at how easily and creatively whole grains can be used as the base for breakfast, dessert, and elegant entrees: Baked Barley Grits with Apples and Sausage will far outdo the standard cornmeal; and Millet Burgers with Olives, Sun-dried Tomatoes, and Pecorino won't leave anyone missing the meat. Tips on quick-cooking grains or precooking ahead of time make cooking with these hearty staples practical for weeknights, and many are appropriate (or can be modified) for vegetarian and vegan diets. Grain Mains is a modern manifesto for whole grains, with inventive and tantalizing recipes.
Over 200,000 copies sold! Now with a newly refreshed design, this classic mathematical folktale tells the story of a clever farmer who outwits the Emperor of China and becomes the wealthiest man in the world—all starting with one grain of rice. When a humble farmer named Pong Lo asks for the hand of the Emperor’s beautiful daughter, the Emperor is enraged. Whoever heard of a peasant marrying a princess? But Pong Lo is wiser than the Emperor knows. And when he concocts a potion that saves the Princess’s life, the Emperor gladly offers him any reward he chooses—except the Princess. Pong Lo makes a surprising request. He asks for a single grain of rice, doubled every day for one hundred days. The baffled Emperor obliges—only to discover that if you’re as clever as Pong Lo, you can turn a single grain of rice into all the wealth and happiness in the world! Praise for A Grain of Rice: “Gracefully illustrated. . . . This original story set in fifteenth-century China will captivate readers and perhaps teach them a little about mathematics.” —Booklist “Clever and quietly told in simple, yet evocative language.” —Kirkus Reviews “Any young reader (with calculator handy) will enjoy the tale.” —Scientific American “[A] book that is wise and humorous, and one to be perused and savored.” —School Library Journal
A volume of 100 whole-grain recipes inspired by the cuisines of Greece, Southern France, Italy and Turkey includes such options as Creamy Breakfast Farro with Honey-Roasted Grapes, Quinoa Cakes with Smoked Trout and Ricotta Millet Pudding with Blood Orange Syrup.
People are eating more greens and grains and feeling virtuous about the abundant vitamins and minerals and invaluable protein and fiber. Best of all, these foods are utterly delicious! The 45 creative recipes in this book combine greens and grains in dishes for all meal occasions that burst with flavor, color, and lusciousness. These flexible recipes not only make weeknight dinners, many requiring only one pot, but also provide a comprehensive reference of cooking methods for dozens of grains, from quinoa to rye berries. More than 30 mouthwatering photographs convey the beauty of grains and "hot" greens, such as kale, chard, spinach, escarole, nettles, and collards. This is an indispensable book for the health-conscious home cook.
Seeks to identify the health risks posed by such common gluten grains as wheat, rye, and barley, contending that many chronic illnesses can be linked to a grain-centered diet as recommended by the food pyramid. Original.
An account of all the new and surprising evidence now available for the beginnings of the earliest civilizations that contradict the standard narrative Why did humans abandon hunting and gathering for sedentary communities dependent on livestock and cereal grains, and governed by precursors of today’s states? Most people believe that plant and animal domestication allowed humans, finally, to settle down and form agricultural villages, towns, and states, which made possible civilization, law, public order, and a presumably secure way of living. But archaeological and historical evidence challenges this narrative. The first agrarian states, says James C. Scott, were born of accumulations of domestications: first fire, then plants, livestock, subjects of the state, captives, and finally women in the patriarchal family—all of which can be viewed as a way of gaining control over reproduction. Scott explores why we avoided sedentism and plow agriculture, the advantages of mobile subsistence, the unforeseeable disease epidemics arising from crowding plants, animals, and grain, and why all early states are based on millets and cereal grains and unfree labor. He also discusses the “barbarians” who long evaded state control, as a way of understanding continuing tension between states and nonsubject peoples.
A resource that has everything gardeners need to know to grow, harvest, store, grind, and cook small crops of nine types of whole grains also includes fifty recipes to bring whole grains to the family table. Original.
A culinary reference features southern Chinese recipes, shares a comprehensive introduction to key seasonings and techniques, and offers such options as smoky eggplant with garlic, twice-cooked pork, and emergency midnight noodles.
Paula Wolfert is passionate about the Mediterranean -- its landscape, its people, its culture, and above all, its rich culinary tradition. Her five earlier cookbooks celebrated the sensuous pleasures of the Mediterranean kitchen and introduced a previously uninitiated American audience to an exciting new way of cooking and eating. In her eagerly awaited Mediterranean Grains and Greens, Wolfert continues that tradition, focusing on the delectable grains and greens-based dishes she discovered as she spent five years traversing the Mediterranean region, from Spain in the west toIsrael, Lebanon, and Syria in the east, with stops in France, Italy, Turkey, and Greece. Here are bountiful breads (Mirsini's Spiced Barley Bread); mouthwatering pastries (Spicy Beef, Olives, and Capers in Semolina Pastry Turnovers); nourishing comfort soups (Garlic Soup with Leafy Greens); crisp salads of mixed greens, cooked green salads, and savory grain salads (Samira's Tabbouleh with Parsley, Bulgur, Cinnamon, and Cumin); unusual desserts (Tunisian Homemade Couscous with Golden Raisins); and accompanying sauces, condiments, and seasonings. Though Mediterranean Grains and Greens is not a vegetarian cookbook, meat, fish, and poultry, when they appear, are used primarily as condiments and flavor enhancers rather than the main focus of a meal. Throughout, Wolfert explains the historical and cultural significance of her dishes, sharing traditional preparation techniques as well as her adaptations for the American home kitchen. Ever conscious of the availability of ingredients in this country, she recommends readily available alternatives found in grocery stores and farmer's markets. Whether foraging for wild "apron greens" in the Turkish countryside, "listening" to risotto in Venice to tell if it's ready to eat, making homemade rustic pasta on the island of Crete, baking Sardinian flatbread the old-fashioned way, scrambling eggs with kofte along the Euphrates, or preparing the unusual "black paellas" of Valencia, Paula Wolfert shares her adventures in the engaging first-person stories that accompany each recipe. This comprehensive collection invites Paula Wolfert's loyal fans and followers to rediscover the joys of Mediterranean living, cooking, and eating right along with her. Like her earlier works, the enticing, wide-ranging Mediterranean Grains and Greens is destined to become a kitchen classic, a book that every serious cook, armchair traveler, and lover of good food will want to own.
In 1941, philosopher and poet Gendun Chopel (1903–51) sent a large manuscript by ship, train, and yak across mountains and deserts to his homeland in the northeastern corner of Tibet. He would follow it five years later, returning to his native land after twelve years in India and Sri Lanka. But he did not receive the welcome he imagined: he was arrested by the government of the regent of the young Dalai Lama on trumped-up charges of treason. He emerged from prison three years later a broken man and died soon after. Gendun Chopel was a prolific writer during his short life. Yet he considered that manuscript, which he titled Grains of Gold, to be his life’s work, one to delight his compatriots with tales of an ancient Indian and Tibetan past, while alerting them to the wonders and dangers of the strikingly modern land abutting Tibet’s southern border, the British colony of India. Now available for the first time in English, Grains of Gold is a unique compendium of South Asian and Tibetan culture that combines travelogue, drawings, history, and ethnography. Gendun Chopel describes the world he discovered in South Asia, from the ruins of the sacred sites of Buddhism to the Sanskrit classics he learned to read in the original. He is also sharply, often humorously critical of the Tibetan love of the fantastic, bursting one myth after another and finding fault with the accounts of earlier Tibetan pilgrims. Exploring a wide range of cultures and religions central to the history of the region, Gendun Chopel is eager to describe all the new knowledge he gathered in his travels to his Buddhist audience in Tibet. At once the account of the experiences of a tragic figure in Tibetan history and the work of an extraordinary scholar, Grains of Gold is an accessible, compelling work animated by a sense of discovery of both a distant past and a strange present.
“A must-read book for anyone suffering from chronic pain” (Sara Gottfried, MD), No Grain, No Pain demonstrates the proven link between a gluten-heavy diet and chronic pain and discomfort—and offers a groundbreaking, 30-day, grain-free diet to help you heal yourself from the inside out. More than 100 million Americans suffer from chronic pain, according to an Institute of Medicine report released in 2011. For many, chronic pain is part of an autoimmune disease, but all too often doctors turn to the same solution: painkilling drugs. But all of this medication simply isn’t helping, and as Dr. Peter Osborne, the leading authority on gluten sensitivity and food allergies has found, the real solution often lies in what you eat. In No Grain, No Pain, Dr. Osborne shows how grains wreak havoc on the body by causing tissue inflammation, creating vitamin and mineral deficiencies, and triggering an autoimmune response that causes the body to attack itself. But he also offers practical steps to find relief. Using his drug-free, easy-to-implement plan, you will be able to eliminate all sources of gluten and gluten-like substances, experience significant improvement in fifteen days, and eliminate pain within thirty days. The first book to identify diet—specifically, grain—as a leading cause of chronic suffering, No Grain, No Pain provides you with the knowledge you need to improve your health. Based on extensive research and examples culled from thousands of his satisfied patients, Dr. Osborne recommends changing your diet to achieve the relief that millions of Americans have been seeking once and for all, leading to a healthier, happier life.
Gluten-Free Ancient Grains: Cereals, Pseudocereals and Legumes covers grains that are not related to wheat. This includes sorghum, the major millets - pearl, foxtail, proso and finger millet, as well as teff, the major pseudocereals - quinoa, amaranth and buckwheat, and emerging legume grains - lupin, cowpea, Bambara groundnut and marama beans. These are all characterized as gluten-free grains. The book provides key information on the sustainable production of these grains. Ancient grains are characterized by their ability to produce a crop under harsh environmental conditions where the major cereals are not-sustainable or even fail. In order to meet growing food demand, and with water resources becoming scarce, this is a highly valuable quality. Chapters review the major grains, analyzing their production and manufacture processes and detailing their impact on long-term good health. Of interest to many people and organizations in the food production chain, this book will be of significant value to agricultural scientists, food company innovation and R&D managers, academic and food company nutritionists and dietitians and governmental and non-governmental health ministries and research institutes. Provides a comprehensive overview of non-wheat grains Reviews the manufacture and sustainable production of these grains, detailing their abilities to grow in harsh conditions Analyzes the nutritional value of ancient grains and their health-promoting qualities
How long will our country last? Why are diseases spreading faster now? What is the real truth about healthcare? William C. Short takes a unique and intelligent look at all of these questions and more: What is money legitimately worth? Is being fair actually "fair"? What does the "Ant and the Grasshopper" fable really teach us? What keeps a tenant from staying rent-free in a home forever? Is regulation good or bad for us? What do politicians and betting on sports games have in common? This witty and informative revelation of how the world really works will have you questioning everything you thought you knew. You just might learn something, too. 127 Grains is guaranteed to provide you hours of conversation at your next social gathering, if not literally making you smarter (although that's not guaranteed)."
Offers recipes for a paleo diet, including Spanish frittata with chorizo, Korean beef noodle bowls, and lemon vanilla bean macaroons.
From a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter at The New York Times comes the troubling story of the rise of the processed food industry -- and how it used salt, sugar, and fat to addict us. Salt Sugar Fat is a journey into the highly secretive world of the processed food giants, and the story of how they have deployed these three essential ingredients, over the past five decades, to dominate the North American diet. This is an eye-opening book that demonstrates how the makers of these foods have chosen, time and again, to double down on their efforts to increase consumption and profits, gambling that consumers and regulators would never figure them out. With meticulous original reporting, access to confidential files and memos, and numerous sources from deep inside the industry, it shows how these companies have pushed ahead, despite their own misgivings (never aired publicly). Salt Sugar Fat is the story of how we got here, and it will hold the food giants accountable for the social costs that keep climbing even as some of the industry's own say, "Enough already."
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The devastating truth about the effects of wheat, sugar, and carbs on the brain, with a 4-week plan to achieve optimum health. In Grain Brain, renowned neurologist David Perlmutter, MD, exposes a finding that's been buried in the medical literature for far too long: carbs are destroying your brain. Even so-called healthy carbs like whole grains can cause dementia, ADHD, epilepsy, anxiety, chronic headaches, depression, decreased libido, and much more. Groundbreaking and timely, Grain Brain shows that the fate of your brain is not in your genes. It's in the food you eat. The cornerstone of all degenerative conditions, including brain disorders, is inflammation, which can be triggered by carbs, especially containing gluten or high in sugar. Dr. Perlmutter explains what happens when the brain encounters common ingredients in your daily bread and fruit bowls, how statin drugs may be erasing your memory, why a diet high in "good fats" is ideal, and how to spur the growth of new brain cells at any age. Dr. Perlmutter's revolutionary 4-week plan shows you how to keep your brain healthy, vibrant, and sharp while dramatically reducing your risk for debilitating neurological diseases as well as relieving more common, everyday conditions -- without drugs. Easy-to-follow strategies, delicious recipes, and weekly goals help you to put the plan into action. With a blend of anecdotes, cutting-edge research, and accessible, practical advice, Grain Brain teaches you how to take control of your "smart genes," regain wellness, and enjoy lifelong health and vitality.
**Selected as Eater's 2016 Cookbook of the Year** **iBooks Best of 2016 Selection** The debut cookbook from Jessica Koslow, award-winning chef of LA’s popular restaurant Sqirl, featuring more than 100 fresh, market-driven, healthy, and flavorful recipes. Jessica Koslow and her restaurant, Sqirl, are at the forefront of the California cooking renaissance, which is all about food that surprises us and engages all of our senses—it looks good, tastes vibrant, and feels fortifying yet refreshing. In Everything I Want to Eat, Koslow shares 100 of her favorite recipes for health-conscious but delicious dishes, all of which always use real foods—no fake meat or fake sugar here—that also happen to be suitable for vegetarians, vegans, or whomever you’re sharing your meal with. The book is organized into seven chapters, each featuring a collection of recipes centered on a key ingredient or theme. Expect to find recipes for dishes Sqirl has become known for, as well as brand-new seasonal flavor combinations, including: Raspberry and cardamom jam Sorrel-pesto rice bowl Burnt brioche toast with house ricotta and seasonal jam Lamb merguez, cranberry beans, roasted tomato, and yogurt cheese Valrhona chocolate fleur de sel cookies Almond hazelnut milk Koslow lives in LA, where everyone is known to be obsessively health-conscious and where dietary restrictions are the norm. People come into Sqirl and order dishes with all sorts of substitutions and modifications—hold the feta, please, add extra kale. They are looking to make their own healthy adventures. Others may tack breakfast sausage, cured bacon, or Olli’s prosciutto on to their order. So Koslow has had to constantly think about ways to modify dishes for certain diets, which in a way has made her a better, more adaptable cook. Throughout this book, Koslow provides notes and thought bubbles that show how just about any dish can be modified for specific tastes and dietary needs, whether it needs to be gluten-free or vegan. Everything I Want to Eat captures the excitement of the food at Sqirl—think of a classic grilled cheese turned playful with the addition of tomato coriander jam—while also offering accessible recipes, like blood orange upside-down cake, that can be easily made in the home kitchen. Moreover, it’s an entirely new kind of cookbook and approach to how we are all starting to think about food, allowing readers to play with the recipes, combining and shaping them to be nothing short of everything you want to eat.
- The first book specifically dedicated to the 20-year-old study of presolar stellar grains - Contains basic background material together with the most recent discoveries - Presents a simple but comprehensive description of the latest stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis theories - Quotes most of the relevant bibliography related to stellar grains and hence can be used as a source of reference

Best Books