This concise introduction to model theory begins with standard notions and takes the reader through to more advanced topics such as stability, simplicity and Hrushovski constructions. The authors introduce the classic results, as well as more recent developments in this vibrant area of mathematical logic. Concrete mathematical examples are included throughout to make the concepts easier to follow. The book also contains over 200 exercises, many with solutions, making the book a useful resource for graduate students as well as researchers.
This book, translated from the French, is an introduction to first-order model theory. The first six chapters are very basic: starting from scratch, they quickly reach the essential, namely, the back-and-forth method and compactness, which are illustrated with examples taken from algebra. The next chapter introduces logic via the study of the models of arithmetic, and the following is a combinatorial tool-box preparing for the chapters on saturated and prime models. The last ten chapters form a rather complete but nevertheless accessible exposition of stability theory, which is the core of the subject.
Presenting recent developments and applications, the book focuses on four main topics in current model theory: 1) the model theory of valued fields; 2) undecidability in arithmetic; 3) NIP theories; and 4) the model theory of real and complex exponentiation. Young researchers in model theory will particularly benefit from the book, as will more senior researchers in other branches of mathematics.
Mathematical Logic and Model Theory: A Brief Introduction offers a streamlined yet easy-to-read introduction to mathematical logic and basic model theory. It presents, in a self-contained manner, the essential aspects of model theory needed to understand model theoretic algebra. As a profound application of model theory in algebra, the last part of this book develops a complete proof of Ax and Kochen's work on Artin's conjecture about Diophantine properties of p-adic number fields. The character of model theoretic constructions and results differ quite significantly from that commonly found in algebra, by the treatment of formulae as mathematical objects. It is therefore indispensable to first become familiar with the problems and methods of mathematical logic. Therefore, the text is divided into three parts: an introduction into mathematical logic (Chapter 1), model theory (Chapters 2 and 3), and the model theoretic treatment of several algebraic theories (Chapter 4). This book will be of interest to both advanced undergraduate and graduate students studying model theory and its applications to algebra. It may also be used for self-study.
Proceedings of a conference held at Centre de recherches mathematiques of the Universite de Montreal, June 18-20, 2009.
This two-volume work bridges the gap between introductory expositions of logic or set theory on one hand, and the research literature on the other. It can be used as a text in an advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate course in mathematics, computer science, or philosophy. The volumes are written in a user-friendly conversational lecture style that makes them equally effective for self-study or class use. Volume II, on formal (ZFC) set theory, incorporates a self-contained 'chapter 0' on proof techniques so that it is based on formal logic, in the style of Bourbaki. The emphasis on basic techniques will provide the reader with a solid foundation in set theory and provides a context for the presentation of advanced topics such as absoluteness, relative consistency results, two expositions of Godel's constructible universe, numerous ways of viewing recursion, and a chapter on Cohen forcing.
Since their inception, the Perspectives in Logic and Lecture Notes in Logic series have published seminal works by leading logicians. Many of the original books in the series have been unavailable for years, but they are now in print once again. Stability theory was introduced and matured in the 1960s and 1970s. Today stability theory influences and is influenced by number theory, algebraic group theory, Riemann surfaces, and representation theory of modules. There is little model theory today that does not involve the methods of stability theory. In this volume, the fourth publication in the Perspectives in Logic series, Steven Buechler bridges the gap between a first-year graduate logic course and research papers in stability theory. The book prepares the student for research in any of today's branches of stability theory, and gives an introduction to classification theory with an exposition of Morley's Categoricity Theorem.
This book provides a self-contained exposition of the theory of linear models, including practical aspects of residuals and data analysis.
This book is a compilation of papers resented at the 2003 European Summer Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic. It includes tutorials and research articles from some of the world's preeminent logicians. Of particular interest is a tutorial on finite model theory and query languages that lie between first-order and second-order logic. Other articles cover current research topics in all areas of mathematical logic, including Proof Theory, Set Theory, Model Theory, Computability Theory, and Philosophy.
A collection of essays celebrating the influence of Alan Turing's work in logic, computer science and related areas.
The first self-contained introduction to techniques of model theory, this 2002 text presents material still not readily available elsewhere, including Krivine's theorem and the Krivine-Maurey theorem on stable Banach spaces.
A comprehensive one-year graduate (or advanced undergraduate) course in mathematical logic and foundations of mathematics. No previous knowledge of logic is required; the book is suitable for self-study. Many exercises (with hints) are included.
This 2007 volume includes surveys, tutorials, and selected research papers on advances in logic.
In the early 1970s, fuzzy systems and fuzzy control theories added a new dimension to control systems engineering. From its beginnings as mostly heuristic and somewhat ad hoc, more recent and rigorous approaches to fuzzy control theory have helped make it an integral part of modern control theory and produced many exciting results. Yesterday's "art" of building a working fuzzy controller has turned into today's "science" of systematic design. To keep pace with and further advance the rapidly developing field of applied control technologies, engineers, both present and future, need some systematic training in the analytic theory and rigorous design of fuzzy control systems. Introduction to Fuzzy Sets, Fuzzy Logic, and Fuzzy Control Systems provides that training by introducing a rigorous and complete fundamental theory of fuzzy sets and fuzzy logic, and then building a practical theory for automatic control of uncertain and ill-modeled systems encountered in many engineering applications. The authors proceed through basic fuzzy mathematics and fuzzy systems theory and conclude with an exploration of some industrial application examples. Almost entirely self-contained, Introduction to Fuzzy Sets, Fuzzy Logic, and Fuzzy Control Systems establishes a strong foundation for designing and analyzing fuzzy control systems under uncertain and irregular conditions. Mastering its contents gives students a clear understanding of fuzzy control systems theory that prepares them for deeper and broader studies and for many practical challenges faced in modern industry.
Arising from a special session held at the 2010 North American Annual Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic, this volume is an international cross-disciplinary collaboration with contributions from leading experts exploring connections across their respective fields. Themes range from philosophical examination of the foundations of physics and quantum logic, to exploitations of the methods and structures of operator theory, category theory, and knot theory in an effort to gain insight into the fundamental questions in quantum theory and logic. The book will appeal to researchers and students working in related fields, including logicians, mathematicians, computer scientists, and physicists. A brief introduction provides essential background on quantum mechanics and category theory, which, together with a thematic selection of articles, may also serve as the basic material for a graduate course or seminar.
This collection of papers is based on a conference that was held in Tehran, Iran, with the express purpose of bringing together researchers with connections to Iranian logicians and promoting further research in mathematical logic in Iran. Particular emphasis was given to model theory and its applications to algebra and formal theories of arithmetic. Other papers address category theory, computability, modal logic, and the history of mathematical logic in Iran.

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