A self-contained introduction to probability, exchangeability and Bayes’ rule provides a theoretical understanding of the applied material. Numerous examples with R-code that can be run "as-is" allow the reader to perform the data analyses themselves. The development of Monte Carlo and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods in the context of data analysis examples provides motivation for these computational methods.
A self-contained introduction to probability, exchangeability and Bayes’ rule provides a theoretical understanding of the applied material. Numerous examples with R-code that can be run "as-is" allow the reader to perform the data analyses themselves. The development of Monte Carlo and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods in the context of data analysis examples provides motivation for these computational methods.
A self-contained introduction to probability, exchangeability and Bayes’ rule provides a theoretical understanding of the applied material. Numerous examples with R-code that can be run "as-is" allow the reader to perform the data analyses themselves. The development of Monte Carlo and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods in the context of data analysis examples provides motivation for these computational methods.
This is an introduction to Bayesian statistics and decision theory, including advanced topics such as Monte Carlo methods. This new edition contains several revised chapters and a new chapter on model choice.
Taken literally, the title "All of Statistics" is an exaggeration. But in spirit, the title is apt, as the book does cover a much broader range of topics than a typical introductory book on mathematical statistics. This book is for people who want to learn probability and statistics quickly. It is suitable for graduate or advanced undergraduate students in computer science, mathematics, statistics, and related disciplines. The book includes modern topics like non-parametric curve estimation, bootstrapping, and classification, topics that are usually relegated to follow-up courses. The reader is presumed to know calculus and a little linear algebra. No previous knowledge of probability and statistics is required. Statistics, data mining, and machine learning are all concerned with collecting and analysing data.
This is a graduate-level textbook on Bayesian analysis blending modern Bayesian theory, methods, and applications. Starting from basic statistics, undergraduate calculus and linear algebra, ideas of both subjective and objective Bayesian analysis are developed to a level where real-life data can be analyzed using the current techniques of statistical computing. Advances in both low-dimensional and high-dimensional problems are covered, as well as important topics such as empirical Bayes and hierarchical Bayes methods and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques. Many topics are at the cutting edge of statistical research. Solutions to common inference problems appear throughout the text along with discussion of what prior to choose. There is a discussion of elicitation of a subjective prior as well as the motivation, applicability, and limitations of objective priors. By way of important applications the book presents microarrays, nonparametric regression via wavelets as well as DMA mixtures of normals, and spatial analysis with illustrations using simulated and real data. Theoretical topics at the cutting edge include high-dimensional model selection and Intrinsic Bayes Factors, which the authors have successfully applied to geological mapping. The style is informal but clear. Asymptotics is used to supplement simulation or understand some aspects of the posterior.
This Bayesian modeling book is intended for practitioners and applied statisticians looking for a self-contained entry to computational Bayesian statistics. Focusing on standard statistical models, it provides an operational methodology for conducting Bayesian inference, rather than focusing on its theoretical justifications.
We have sold 4300 copies worldwide of the first edition (1999). This new edition contains five completely new chapters covering new developments.
The idea of writing this bookarosein 2000when the ?rst author wasassigned to teach the required course STATS 240 (Statistical Methods in Finance) in the new M. S. program in ?nancial mathematics at Stanford, which is an interdisciplinary program that aims to provide a master’s-level education in applied mathematics, statistics, computing, ?nance, and economics. Students in the programhad di?erent backgroundsin statistics. Some had only taken a basic course in statistical inference, while others had taken a broad spectrum of M. S. - and Ph. D. -level statistics courses. On the other hand, all of them had already taken required core courses in investment theory and derivative pricing, and STATS 240 was supposed to link the theory and pricing formulas to real-world data and pricing or investment strategies. Besides students in theprogram,thecoursealso attractedmanystudentsfromother departments in the university, further increasing the heterogeneity of students, as many of them had a strong background in mathematical and statistical modeling from the mathematical, physical, and engineering sciences but no previous experience in ?nance. To address the diversity in background but common strong interest in the subject and in a potential career as a “quant” in the ?nancialindustry,thecoursematerialwascarefullychosennotonlytopresent basic statistical methods of importance to quantitative ?nance but also to summarize domain knowledge in ?nance and show how it can be combined with statistical modeling in ?nancial analysis and decision making. The course material evolved over the years, especially after the second author helped as the head TA during the years 2004 and 2005.
Understanding spatial statistics requires tools from applied and mathematical statistics, linear model theory, regression, time series, and stochastic processes. It also requires a mindset that focuses on the unique characteristics of spatial data and the development of specialized analytical tools designed explicitly for spatial data analysis. Statistical Methods for Spatial Data Analysis answers the demand for a text that incorporates all of these factors by presenting a balanced exposition that explores both the theoretical foundations of the field of spatial statistics as well as practical methods for the analysis of spatial data. This book is a comprehensive and illustrative treatment of basic statistical theory and methods for spatial data analysis, employing a model-based and frequentist approach that emphasizes the spatial domain. It introduces essential tools and approaches including: measures of autocorrelation and their role in data analysis; the background and theoretical framework supporting random fields; the analysis of mapped spatial point patterns; estimation and modeling of the covariance function and semivariogram; a comprehensive treatment of spatial analysis in the spectral domain; and spatial prediction and kriging. The volume also delivers a thorough analysis of spatial regression, providing a detailed development of linear models with uncorrelated errors, linear models with spatially-correlated errors and generalized linear mixed models for spatial data. It succinctly discusses Bayesian hierarchical models and concludes with reviews on simulating random fields, non-stationary covariance, and spatio-temporal processes. Additional material on the CRC Press website supplements the content of this book. The site provides data sets used as examples in the text, software code that can be used to implement many of the principal methods described and illustrated, and updates to the text itself.
This book outlines Bayesian statistical analysis in great detail, from the development of a model through the process of making statistical inference. The key feature of this book is that it covers models that are most commonly used in social science research - including the linear regression model, generalized linear models, hierarchical models, and multivariate regression models - and it thoroughly develops each real-data example in painstaking detail.
​This book is for students and researchers who have had a first year graduate level mathematical statistics course. It covers classical likelihood, Bayesian, and permutation inference; an introduction to basic asymptotic distribution theory; and modern topics like M-estimation, the jackknife, and the bootstrap. R code is woven throughout the text, and there are a large number of examples and problems. An important goal has been to make the topics accessible to a wide audience, with little overt reliance on measure theory. A typical semester course consists of Chapters 1-6 (likelihood-based estimation and testing, Bayesian inference, basic asymptotic results) plus selections from M-estimation and related testing and resampling methodology. Dennis Boos and Len Stefanski are professors in the Department of Statistics at North Carolina State. Their research has been eclectic, often with a robustness angle, although Stefanski is also known for research concentrated on measurement error, including a co-authored book on non-linear measurement error models. In recent years the authors have jointly worked on variable selection methods. ​
This Bayesian modeling book provides a self-contained entry to computational Bayesian statistics. Focusing on the most standard statistical models and backed up by real datasets and an all-inclusive R (CRAN) package called bayess, the book provides an operational methodology for conducting Bayesian inference, rather than focusing on its theoretical and philosophical justifications. Readers are empowered to participate in the real-life data analysis situations depicted here from the beginning. Special attention is paid to the derivation of prior distributions in each case and specific reference solutions are given for each of the models. Similarly, computational details are worked out to lead the reader towards an effective programming of the methods given in the book. In particular, all R codes are discussed with enough detail to make them readily understandable and expandable. Bayesian Essentials with R can be used as a textbook at both undergraduate and graduate levels. It is particularly useful with students in professional degree programs and scientists to analyze data the Bayesian way. The text will also enhance introductory courses on Bayesian statistics. Prerequisites for the book are an undergraduate background in probability and statistics, if not in Bayesian statistics.
An Introduction to Statistical Learning provides an accessible overview of the field of statistical learning, an essential toolset for making sense of the vast and complex data sets that have emerged in fields ranging from biology to finance to marketing to astrophysics in the past twenty years. This book presents some of the most important modeling and prediction techniques, along with relevant applications. Topics include linear regression, classification, resampling methods, shrinkage approaches, tree-based methods, support vector machines, clustering, and more. Color graphics and real-world examples are used to illustrate the methods presented. Since the goal of this textbook is to facilitate the use of these statistical learning techniques by practitioners in science, industry, and other fields, each chapter contains a tutorial on implementing the analyses and methods presented in R, an extremely popular open source statistical software platform. Two of the authors co-wrote The Elements of Statistical Learning (Hastie, Tibshirani and Friedman, 2nd edition 2009), a popular reference book for statistics and machine learning researchers. An Introduction to Statistical Learning covers many of the same topics, but at a level accessible to a much broader audience. This book is targeted at statisticians and non-statisticians alike who wish to use cutting-edge statistical learning techniques to analyze their data. The text assumes only a previous course in linear regression and no knowledge of matrix algebra.
There has been dramatic growth in the development and application of Bayesian inference in statistics. Berger (2000) documents the increase in Bayesian activity by the number of published research articles, the number of books,andtheextensivenumberofapplicationsofBayesianarticlesinapplied disciplines such as science and engineering. One reason for the dramatic growth in Bayesian modeling is the availab- ity of computational algorithms to compute the range of integrals that are necessary in a Bayesian posterior analysis. Due to the speed of modern c- puters, it is now possible to use the Bayesian paradigm to ?t very complex models that cannot be ?t by alternative frequentist methods. To ?t Bayesian models, one needs a statistical computing environment. This environment should be such that one can: write short scripts to de?ne a Bayesian model use or write functions to summarize a posterior distribution use functions to simulate from the posterior distribution construct graphs to illustrate the posterior inference An environment that meets these requirements is the R system. R provides a wide range of functions for data manipulation, calculation, and graphical d- plays. Moreover, it includes a well-developed, simple programming language that users can extend by adding new functions. Many such extensions of the language in the form of packages are easily downloadable from the Comp- hensive R Archive Network (CRAN).
Intended as the text for a sequence of advanced courses, this book covers major topics in theoretical statistics in a concise and rigorous fashion. The discussion assumes a background in advanced calculus, linear algebra, probability, and some analysis and topology. Measure theory is used, but the notation and basic results needed are presented in an initial chapter on probability, so prior knowledge of these topics is not essential. The presentation is designed to expose students to as many of the central ideas and topics in the discipline as possible, balancing various approaches to inference as well as exact, numerical, and large sample methods. Moving beyond more standard material, the book includes chapters introducing bootstrap methods, nonparametric regression, equivariant estimation, empirical Bayes, and sequential design and analysis. The book has a rich collection of exercises. Several of them illustrate how the theory developed in the book may be used in various applications. Solutions to many of the exercises are included in an appendix.
This book is based on over a dozen years teaching a Bayesian Statistics course. The material presented here has been used by students of different levels and disciplines, including advanced undergraduates studying Mathematics and Statistics and students in graduate programs in Statistics, Biostatistics, Engineering, Economics, Marketing, Pharmacy, and Psychology. The goal of the book is to impart the basics of designing and carrying out Bayesian analyses, and interpreting and communicating the results. In addition, readers will learn to use the predominant software for Bayesian model-fitting, R and OpenBUGS. The practical approach this book takes will help students of all levels to build understanding of the concepts and procedures required to answer real questions by performing Bayesian analysis of real data. Topics covered include comparing and contrasting Bayesian and classical methods, specifying hierarchical models, and assessing Markov chain Monte Carlo output. Kate Cowles taught Suzuki piano for many years before going to graduate school in Biostatistics. Her research areas are Bayesian and computational statistics, with application to environmental science. She is on the faculty of Statistics at The University of Iowa.
Finite-dimensional optimization problems occur throughout the mathematical sciences. The majority of these problems cannot be solved analytically. This introduction to optimization attempts to strike a balance between presentation of mathematical theory and development of numerical algorithms. Building on students’ skills in calculus and linear algebra, the text provides a rigorous exposition without undue abstraction. Its stress on statistical applications will be especially appealing to graduate students of statistics and biostatistics. The intended audience also includes students in applied mathematics, computational biology, computer science, economics, and physics who want to see rigorous mathematics combined with real applications. In this second edition the emphasis remains on finite-dimensional optimization. New material has been added on the MM algorithm, block descent and ascent, and the calculus of variations. Convex calculus is now treated in much greater depth. Advanced topics such as the Fenchel conjugate, subdifferentials, duality, feasibility, alternating projections, projected gradient methods, exact penalty methods, and Bregman iteration will equip students with the essentials for understanding modern data mining techniques in high dimensions.
Bayesian Reliability presents modern methods and techniques for analyzing reliability data from a Bayesian perspective. The adoption and application of Bayesian methods in virtually all branches of science and engineering have significantly increased over the past few decades. This increase is largely due to advances in simulation-based computational tools for implementing Bayesian methods. The authors extensively use such tools throughout this book, focusing on assessing the reliability of components and systems with particular attention to hierarchical models and models incorporating explanatory variables. Such models include failure time regression models, accelerated testing models, and degradation models. The authors pay special attention to Bayesian goodness-of-fit testing, model validation, reliability test design, and assurance test planning. Throughout the book, the authors use Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms for implementing Bayesian analyses -- algorithms that make the Bayesian approach to reliability computationally feasible and conceptually straightforward. This book is primarily a reference collection of modern Bayesian methods in reliability for use by reliability practitioners. There are more than 70 illustrative examples, most of which utilize real-world data. This book can also be used as a textbook for a course in reliability and contains more than 160 exercises. Noteworthy highlights of the book include Bayesian approaches for the following: Goodness-of-fit and model selection methods Hierarchical models for reliability estimation Fault tree analysis methodology that supports data acquisition at all levels in the tree Bayesian networks in reliability analysis Analysis of failure count and failure time data collected from repairable systems, and the assessment of various related performance criteria Analysis of nondestructive and destructive degradation data Optimal design of reliability experiments Hierarchical reliability assurance testing
"...this edition is useful and effective in teaching Bayesian inference at both elementary and intermediate levels. It is a well-written book on elementary Bayesian inference, and the material is easily accessible. It is both concise and timely, and provides a good collection of overviews and reviews of important tools used in Bayesian statistical methods." There is a strong upsurge in the use of Bayesian methods in applied statistical analysis, yet most introductory statistics texts only present frequentist methods. Bayesian statistics has many important advantages that students should learn about if they are going into fields where statistics will be used. In this third Edition, four newly-added chapters address topics that reflect the rapid advances in the field of Bayesian statistics. The authors continue to provide a Bayesian treatment of introductory statistical topics, such as scientific data gathering, discrete random variables, robust Bayesian methods, and Bayesian approaches to inference for discrete random variables, binomial proportions, Poisson, and normal means, and simple linear regression. In addition, more advanced topics in the field are presented in four new chapters: Bayesian inference for a normal with unknown mean and variance; Bayesian inference for a Multivariate Normal mean vector; Bayesian inference for the Multiple Linear Regression Model; and Computational Bayesian Statistics including Markov Chain Monte Carlo. The inclusion of these topics will facilitate readers' ability to advance from a minimal understanding of Statistics to the ability to tackle topics in more applied, advanced level books. Minitab macros and R functions are available on the book's related website to assist with chapter exercises. Introduction to Bayesian Statistics, Third Edition also features: Topics including the Joint Likelihood function and inference using independent Jeffreys priors and join conjugate prior The cutting-edge topic of computational Bayesian Statistics in a new chapter, with a unique focus on Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods Exercises throughout the book that have been updated to reflect new applications and the latest software applications Detailed appendices that guide readers through the use of R and Minitab software for Bayesian analysis and Monte Carlo simulations, with all related macros available on the book's website Introduction to Bayesian Statistics, Third Edition is a textbook for upper-undergraduate or first-year graduate level courses on introductory statistics course with a Bayesian emphasis. It can also be used as a reference work for statisticians who require a working knowledge of Bayesian statistics.

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