Since it was first published in 1929, “A Garden Book for Houston and the Texas Gulf Coast has been the authoritative go-to book on gardening for Houstonians and Texas Gulf Coast residents. This 5th edition has been entirely updated, expanded, and colorfully redesigned with a new emphasis on organic gardening and using native plants. This latest edition reaffirms River Oaks Garden Club's commitment to preserving the environment, promoting sustainability, and planting with a purpose.
A discussion of everything a gardener needs to know. It covers design, soil improvement, drainage, watering, lawns, trees, shrubs, vines, ground covers, bulbs, flowers, and gardens for colour, shade, fragrance or vegetables.
Whether you're a first-time homeowner, dedicated gardener, or landscape professional, if you're gardening on the Gulf Coast, you need Howard Garrett's Plants for Houston and the Gulf Coast. Garrett is one of Texas's top organic gardening experts, and gardeners rely on him for accurate, sensible advice about what to plant and how to maintain healthy yards and landscapes without synthetic fertilizers and toxic pesticides. In Plants for Houston and the Gulf Coast, Garrett presents nearly 400 plants, both native and adapted, that grow well in Southeast Texas. Like all of Howard Garrett's books, Plants for Houston and the Gulf Coast is loaded with indispensable gardening information: Nearly 400 trees, shrubs, groundcovers and vines, annuals and perennials, and grasses 400 full-color, close-up photos of the plants Expert information about each plant's appearance, growing requirements, landscape uses, potential problems, and other interesting facts Precise, easy-to-follow instructions about how to design a garden, prepare the soil, install trees and other plants, grow grass and control weeds, and maintain the landscape and control pests A detailed gardening calendar for Southeast Texas that lists specific plants to plant and maintenance tasks to perform each month No other book currently available provides such extensive and reliable information for Texas Gulf Coast gardeners.
Offers advice to gardeners on how to cope with the climateand soil of the Texas Gulf Coast region, reviewing the basics of how plants grow, soil preparation, planting and maintenance, and pest control; and featuring descriptions of major landscape plants, seasonal flowers, tropicals, vegetables, and table crops.
Among America's garden cities, one of the most remarkably beautiful is New Orleans. Now the exotic New Orleans garden can live not only in romance but also in settings very close to home. Whether in the Vieux Carre or in the humid hinterlands, anyone hoping to recreate such a romantic spot in the climes of the Gulf Coast region should consult Charlotte Seidenberg's essential handbook. In this new edition of a favorite manual among New Orleans gardeners, Seidenberg instructs how to create a beautiful garden in this subtropical, sometimes richly alluvial zone and identifies plants that over generations have become a part of the gardening heritage of New Orleans. She discusses such basics as soil preparation and pest control and advises the gardener on how to grow roses, native and exotic trees and shrubs, vines, annuals, perennials, ferns, wildflowers, bulbous and tuberous plants, and groundcovers. She instructs how best to create specialty gardens such as container gardens and herb gardens. Like many other gardeners today, she is ecology-conscious, strongly advocating that one should garden not only for beauty but also for attracting wildlife.
Texas hosts an unparalleled number of butterfly species, and whether one lives near the beaches of the Gulf Coast or in the mountains of the Trans-Pecos, all Texans can enjoy the color and tranquility that butterflies bring to any outdoor space. In Butterfly Gardening for Texas, author and expert Geyata Ajilvsgi shares a wealth of practical information about all kinds of butterflies and the many flowers and other plants they utilize in their miraculous life cycle: from hidden egg to munching caterpillar to cryptic chrysalis to nectar-sipping, winged adult. Written in an engaging, nontechnical style for anyone who wants to attract butterflies to the yard or garden, the book provides tips for making gardens caterpillar- and butterfly-friendly, in-depth profiles of more than fifty butterflies, descriptions of the food plants for a variety of both caterpillars and butterflies, and plant lists for easy selection and substitution, depending on where you live and what is available. For those who want specific advice on what to plant where, Ajilvsgi has designed useful, adaptable landscape plans and extensive planting options for each of seven state regions. Helpful appendices aid gardeners in taking photographs of the butterflies they attract, in locating sources for seeds and plants, and in finding organizations and other instructive publications for additional information about these beautiful and beneficial insects. As the popularity of butterfly gardening continues to increase, gardeners of all skill levels will find Butterfly Gardening for Texas an invaluable source of guidance and inspiration.
The Houston area offers an abundance of resources and activities for gardeners and garden lovers, if people only know where to look: Love roses? Go to the Garden Center in Hermann Park. Want fresh vegetables? Pay in advance for a weekly supply at Central City Co-op. Can’t live without daffodils? Find twenty varieties at the Bulb and Plants Mart. In this handy, versatile guide to all things related to gardens in Houston and its environs, Texas Master Gardener Eileen Houston presents the book she wished had been available when she first moved to the city. Writing about public gardens, garden events, farmers’ markets, garden clubs, retail nurseries, volunteer opportunities, and more, Houston shares her favorite finds in an opening section, called “Best of the Best,” listing places and events she believes garden enthusiasts will not want to miss. For each garden site, event, and outlet, readers learn what they need to know about times, fees, locations, and contact information. A map and key help identify which destinations will require some planning and which can be easily enjoyed, depending on where readers live or work. Helpful descriptions focus on the special features or distinctive ambience of each place or happening. A chapter on retail sources is packed with advice: where to buy native or organically raised plants; how to find specialty shops and nurseries devoted to specific kinds of plants, such as African violets, bonsai, tropicals, roses, orchids, and cacti;· which retailers offer fountains, benches, sculptures, and antique garden accessories. At the end of the book, Houston steers readers to her recommended garden books and websites. Anyone interested in exploring the gardening scene in Houston and surrounding areas—whether resident or visitor, participant or spectator—will discover in this book much to do and share with family, friends, and fellow gardeners.
In the early twentieth century, developers from Baltimore to Beverly Hills built garden suburbs, a new kind of residential community that incorporated curvilinear roads and landscape design as picturesque elements in a neighborhood. Intended as models for how American cities should be rationally, responsibly, and beautifully modernized, garden suburban communities were fragments of a larger (if largely imagined) garden city—the mythical "good" city of U.S. city-planning practices of the 1920s. This extensively illustrated book chronicles the development of the two most fully realized garden suburbs in Texas, Dallas's Highland Park and Houston's River Oaks. Cheryl Caldwell Ferguson draws on a wealth of primary sources to trace the planning, design, financing, implementation, and long-term management of these suburbs. She analyzes homes built by such architects as H. B. Thomson, C. D. Hill, Fooshee & Cheek, John F. Staub, Birdsall P. Briscoe, and Charles W. Oliver. She also addresses the evolution of the shopping center by looking at Highland Park's Shopping Village, which was one of the first in the nation. Ferguson sets the story of Highland Park and River Oaks within the larger story of the development of garden suburban communities in Texas and across America to explain why these two communities achieved such prestige, maintained their property values, became the most successful in their cities in the twentieth century, and still serve as ideal models for suburban communities today.
Dreitausendeinhundertzwanzig Postkarten mit romantischen Gedichten hat Gabe Alexander seiner Frau Pearl im Lauf ihrer Ehe geschrieben. Eine pro Woche. Jeden Freitag. Sechzig Jahre lang. Inzwischen ist Gabe tot, und Pearl leidet an Demenz. Doch die Geschichte ihrer Liebe lebt weiter - durch die Postkarten, die eines Tages dem Immobilienmakler Adam Colby in die Hände fallen. Stück für Stück rekonstruiert Adam, selbst frisch geschieden und vom Leben enttäuscht, die Geschichte von Gabe und Pearl, um so dem Geheimnis ewiger Liebe auf die Spur zu kommen... Ein zauberhafter Roman über die Magie der Liebe.
Randy Lemmon is the host of Houston's GardenLine radio program, on Clear Channel's TalkRadio 950 KPRC. Over 1.4 million Houstonians garden for a hobby or pastime, and GardenLine is where they listen for advice and information on gardening and landscaping. Every Saturday and Sunday 8 a.m.-noon, GardenLine's Randy Lemmon answers listeners' questions on everything from aphids to zoysias. He's Houston's absolute expert on lawns and gardens, offering help to listeners both with and without "green thumbs." Randy's a Texas Aggie who truly KNOWS plants and flowers. He explains them with ease and candor, and is as competent a "plant" person as there is. He studies, and he practices. He embraces "new methods" as well as the "old" ways of dealing with problems. Gulf Coast Gardening with Randy Lemmon is the first book in a new series he has authored, to be published through Our House Press (the non-fiction division of Cyber-Pulp Press).
Introduction. Architecture at the crossroads ; Texas building blocks ; Old world crosses new world ; Earliest European settlement ; Transplanted Renaissance ; Fateful bargains ; Jeffersonian democracy ; Early statehood ; Patrolling the frontier ; War and reconstruction ; State of mobility ; New public buildings ; Cities beautiful, in Parts and wholes ; Modernist awakening ; Patriotic fervor ; Architecture of emergency ; The new deal in Texas ; The home front in World War II ; Housing crisis ; Cold war, cold buildings ; Breaking the ice ; Lost and found ; Millennial crossroads -- Central Texas. Austin ; Prairie view to San Felipe ; Bastrop to Taylor ; Navasota to Salado ; Waco to Tehuacana -- South central Texas. San Antonio ; Seguin to Floresville ; New Braunfels to Bandera ; Castroville to Jourdanton -- South Texas. Corpus Christi ; Port Aransas to Violet ; Kingsville to Alice ; Laredo ; San Ygnacio to Mission ; McAllen to Raymondville ; Hidalgo to Los Indios ; Brownsville to South Padre Island -- Gulf Coast. Houston ; Tomball to Montgomery ; Orange to Port Arthur ; Beaumont ; Anahuac to Texas City ; Galveston ; Angleton to Stafford ; Wharton to Danevang ; Bay City to Edna ; Victoria ; Refugio to Fulton ; Goliad to Beeville -- Glossary.
This comprehensive and compact field guide covers the richest plant-life region in the state—the Upper Gulf Coast Prairie, the Post Oak Savannah, and the Pineywoods of east Texas. Eastern, northern, Gulf coast, and western Texas trees occur together in the Big Thicket area of the Pineywoods, where abundant rainfall and mild temperatures also make possible much tropical growth. Trees of East Texas is drawn from Robert A. Vines' monumental Trees, Shrubs, and Woody Vines of the Southwest (University of Texas Press, 1960). Without sacrificing the essential detail of the original work, this guide has been designed to travel info the field for on-the-spot identification. Meant to be carried and consulted, Trees of East Texas is conveniently organized, and virtually every description is accompanied by a finely executed illustration. This book contains new and updated information, and every native and naturalized tree in the area is identified. In addition to the technical descriptions, the author provides, in his "Remarks" sections, common names and fascinating bits of history and lore on each tree cited.

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