The first modern history of Scottish woodlands, this highly illustrated volume explores the changing relationship between trees and people from the time of Scotland's first settlement, focusing on the period 1500 to 1920. Drawing on work in natural science, geography and history, as well as on the authors' own research, it presents an accessible and readable account that balances social, economic and environmental factors. Two opening chapters describe the early history of the woodlands. The book is then divided into chapters that consider traditional uses and management, the impact of outsiders on the pine woods and the oakwoods in the first phase of exploitation, and the effect of industrialization. Separate chapters are devoted to case studies of management at Strathcarron, Glenorchy, Rothiemurchus, and on Skye.
The first modern history of Scottish woodlands, this highly illustrated volume explores the changing relationship between trees and people from the time of Scotland's first settlement, focusing on the period 1500 to 1920. Drawing on work in natural science, geography and history, as well as on the authors' own research, it presents an accessible and readable account that balances social, economic and environmental factors. Two opening chapters describe the early history of the woodlands. The book is then divided into chapters that consider traditional uses and management, the impact of outsiders on the pine woods and the oakwoods in the first phase of exploitation, and the effect of industrialization. Separate chapters are devoted to case studies of management at Strathcarron, Glenorchy, Rothiemurchus, and on Skye.
Over the last three decades major advances in research and scholarship have transformed understanding of the Scottish past. In this landmark study some of the most eminent writers on the subject, together with emerging new talents, have combined to produce a large-scale volume which reconsiders in fresh and illuminating ways the classic themes of the nation's history since the sixteenth century as well as a number of new topics which are only now receiving detailed attention. Such major themes as the Reformation, the Union of 1707, the Scottish Enlightenment, clearances, industrialisation, empire, emigration, and the Great War are approached from novel and fascinating perspectives, but so too are such issues as the Scottish environment, myth, family, criminality, the literary tradition, and Scotland's contemporary history. All chapters contain expert syntheses of current knowledge, but their authors also stand back and reflect critically on the questions which still remain unanswered, the issues which generate dispute and controversy, and sketch out where appropriate the agenda for future research. The Handbook also places the Scottish experience firmly into an international historical perspective with a considerable focus on the age-old emigration of the Scottish people, the impact of successive waves of immigrants to Scotland, and the nation's key role within the British Empire. The overall result is a vibrant and stimulating review of modern Scottish history: essential reading for students and scholars alike.
The Battle of Dunnichen is significant since it marked the turning point in the history of the Picts and marked their independence from the Kingdom of Northumbria. Not only is this possibly the best documented event in the history of the Picts, but it also allowed them to overthrow the Northumbrian rule and the dark shadow it cast over all northern peoples. Without the leadership of King Bridei and his courageous followers, Scotland as we know it may not have existed. The battle also helped to define the Scottish/English border that remains today, a border that could have been pushed further north by the Northumbrians if they had not been stopped.
This book explores how a consideration of time and history can improve the practice of restoration. There is a past of restoration, as well as past assumptions about restoration, and such assumptions have political and social implications. This book aims to put the dimension of time back into our understanding of environmental efforts.
In this comprehensive book, the critical components of the European landscape - forest, parkland, and other grazed landscapes with trees are addressed. The book considers the history of grazed treed landscapes, of large grazing herbivores in Europe, and the implications of the past in shaping our environment today and in the future. Debates on the types of anciently grazed landscapes in Europe, and what they tell us about past and present ecology, have been especially topical and controversial recently. This treatment brings the current discussions and the latest research to a much wider audience. The book breaks new ground in broadening the scope of wood-pasture and woodland research to address sites and ecologies that have previously been overlooked but which hold potential keys to understanding landscape dynamics. Eminent contributors, including Oliver Rackham and Frans Vera, present a text which addresses the importance of history in understanding the past landscape, and the relevance of historical ecology and landscape studies in providing a future vision.
Edward Waverley stammt aus englischem Adel. Während sein Vater in London eine politische Karriere als Parteigänger der Whigs macht, damals die Unterstützer der Monarchen aus dem Haus Hannover, wird Waverley von seinem Onkel aufgezogen, der ihm die alten jakobitischen Werte vermittelt, also die der Anhänger des Hauses Stuart. Waverley ist im Laufe des Romans hin- und hergerissen zwischen widerstreitenden Loyalitäten: den Verpflichtungen als britischem Offizier und der Treue zu den kennengelernten Schotten und der Faszination an der traditionellen Kultur der schottischen Highlands. Waverley handelt dabei oft nicht selbst, sondern wird von den Ereignissen um ihn herum mitgerissen.

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