Knight presents the fundamentals of journalistic writing in his easy, engaging, often humorous style. Broader and more comprehensive yet still as readable as its predecessor, the new edition of A Journalistic Approach to Good Writing has more examples and exercises, a full chapter of the roots of English to help students better appreciate the language, a new chapter on "Building the Story" to guide novice writers in story development, and handy appendices that serve as short guides to newspaper and broadcast writing styles and an alphabetical list of grammar and usage points. Aimed at all students of journalism, especially beginning writers, the second edition of A Journalistic Approach to Good Writing: The Craft of Clarity offers a practical skills-based approach to good, honest communication.
"An indispensable guide." Richard Lederer, author of The Write Way, Sleeping Dogs Don't Lay, and Comma Sense --
Offering aspiring authors dependable skills beyond the high school classroom, this reference covers the essentials of composing superior prose. Clear instructions on all aspects are featured, including approaching a topic, penning a solid introduction, bringing a story together, and editing for precision. Guaranteed to make every word count and maintain an appropriate energy level, this expert handbook is also filled with real-world examples of published writing--both good and bad--providing quick and humorous advice for all writers looking to showcase their work in speeches, broadcasting, or on the internet.
Why are living things alive? As a theoretical biologist, Robert Rosen saw this as the most fundamental of all questions-and yet it had never been answered satisfactorily by science. The answers to this question would allow humanity to make an enormous leap forward in our understanding of the principles at work in our world. For centuries, it was believed that the only scientific approach to the question "What is life?" must proceed from the Cartesian metaphor (organism as machine). Classical approaches in science, which also borrow heavily from Newtonian mechanics, are based on a process called "reductionism." The thinking was that we can better learn about an intricate, complicated system (like an organism) if we take it apart, study the components, and then reconstruct the system-thereby gaining an understanding of the whole. However, Rosen argues that reductionism does not work in biology and ignores the complexity of organisms. Life Itself, a landmark work, represents the scientific and intellectual journey that led Rosen to question reductionism and develop new scientific approaches to understanding the nature of life. Ultimately, Rosen proposes an answer to the original question about the causal basis of life in organisms. He asserts that renouncing the mechanistic and reductionistic paradigm does not mean abandoning science. Instead, Rosen offers an alternate paradigm for science that takes into account the relational impacts of organization in natural systems and is based on organized matter rather than on particulate matter alone. Central to Rosen's work is the idea of a "complex system," defined as any system that cannot be fully understood by reducing it to its parts. In this sense, complexity refers to the causal impact of organization on the system as a whole. Since both the atom and the organism can be seen to fit that description, Rosen asserts that complex organization is a general feature not just of the biosphere on Earth-but of the universe itself.
Profiles the characteristics of and qualifications needed for fourteen jobs in the writing industry.
Do you struggle with research papers for school? Is business writing one of your weak areas? Are you at a loss for what to include in thank-you notes? The Everything Improve Your Writing Book, 2nd Edition can help! With a few simple rules and a little guidance, you, too, can write clearly and concisely. Publishing professional Pamela Rice Hahn outlines simple steps for you to follow for various types of writing, including: Social writing, such as thank-you and get-well notes, congratulatory messages, and invitation responses Journalism, such as letters to the editor, press releases, and freelance article writing Personal and biographical essays Business writing, including sales letters, requests for proposals, and press packets With this practical guide, you'll learn to choose the appropriate tone, use the correct format, and communicate effectively. Whether for school, for work, or just for fun, writing will be a chore no more! Pamela Rice Hahn is the author of The Everything Writing Well Book and Alpha Teach Yourself Grammar and Style in 24 Hours and coauthor of Writing for Profit. Hahn's work has appeared in Glamour, Country Living, Business Venture, Current Notes, and other national publications. She lives in Celina, OH.
"An indispensable guide." Richard Lederer, author of The Write Way, Sleeping Dogs Don't Lay, and Comma Sense --
The Student Newspaper Survival Guide has been extensively updated to cover recent developments in online publishing, social media, mobile journalism, and multimedia storytelling; at the same time, it continues to serve as an essential reference on all aspects of producing a student publication. Updated and expanded to discuss many of the changes in the field of journalism and in college newspapers, with two new chapters to enhance the focus on online journalism and technology Emphasis on Web-first publishing and covering breaking news as it happens, including a new section on mobile journalism Guides student journalists through the intricate, multi-step process of producing a student newspaper including the challenges of reporting, writing, editing, designing, and publishing campus newspapers and websites Chapters include discussion questions, exercises, sample projects, checklists, tips from professionals, sample forms, story ideas, and scenarios for discussion Fresh, new, full color examples from award winning college newspapers around North America Essential reading for student reporters, editors, page designers, photographers, webmasters, and advertising sales representatives
The third edition of Writing the News continues the tradition of its predecessors by providing journalists with a clear and concise introduction to the craft of newswriting. In addition to updating and adding to the number of examples from the contemporary press, this new edition includes a section on the increasingly popular narrative form of the news feature and an expanded chapter on news style.
Outrage: Art, Controversy, and Society explores controversy in the arts, and especially the extent to which such controversies are socially rather than just aesthetically conditioned. It pays special attention to the way these controversies move beyond the world of art and into the public sphere—and often return to reshape the art world itself. It investigates how and why this happens, with particular emphasis on the social dynamics involved, including class, religion, culture, and -above all- power. It argues that only through a deeper understanding of the interaction between these forces and art can we be in a better position to evaluate the controversies that rage around the place of artworks in a public setting. The book's case studies ultimately combine to provide much-needed insight into the range of vested interests that are manifest in 'the arts in society.'
Writing as Craft and Magic, Second Edition, outlines a compelling approach to conceiving, reporting, organizing, and writing articles for today's media. The book revolves around the central idea that writers improve most quickly by combining the powers of technique ("craft") with creativity ("magic"). Applying this method to news and feature writing--both print and online--it focuses on leads, organization, transition, clarity, drama, and other elements that drive good writing toward excellence. Aimed at students in upper-level undergraduate writing and reporting courses, Writing as Craft and Magic provides a clear and succinct instructional system--with practical models, a wealth of examples, and step-by-step guides--to help students understand and apply craft and magic to daily assignments. Author Carl Sessions Stepp, a seasoned journalist at the national level, structures his system in three parts. He first evokes the art of writing, then applies that art to standard journalistic writing, and concludes with a strong section on advanced writing techniques for features. He also offers advice and tips on how newsrooms currently operate in the age of multimedia journalism. This revised edition includes an expanded exercise section at the end of each chapter, more coverage of the demands of multimedia journalism (convergence), and updated chapters on incorporating the Internet into research and writing for the daily news cycle.
Mystified over misplaced modifiers? In a trance from intransitive verbs? Paralyzed from using the passive voice? To aid writers, from beginners to professionals, legendary writing coach Jack Hart presents a comprehensive, practical, step-by-step approach to the writing process. He shares his techniques for composing and sustaining powerful writing and demonstrates how to overcome the most common obstacles such as procrastination, writer’s block, and excessive polishing. With instructive examples and excerpts from outstanding writing to provide inspiration, A Writer’s Coach is a boon to writers, editors, teachers, and students. From the Trade Paperback edition.
This resource from Leonard Mogel serves as a primer for those interested in pursuing a career in the newspaper business. It discusses the medium as it exists today and how it is meeting competition from the other deliverers of news. The book provides fundamentals on the types of existing newspapers, from the big U.S. dailies to the community weeklies; job opportunities, including tips for job hunters; newspaper operations and production; newspaper display and classified advertising; and newspaper marketing and promotion. Also included are special sections and chapters discussing journalism school and program attributes, Sunday magazines and comics, and the internal operations of the Associated Press and other news-gathering services.
For centuries writers have used participatory experience as a lens through which to better see the world at large and as a means of exploring the self. Considering various types of participatory writing as different strains of one style—immersion writing—Robin Hemley offers new perspectives and practical advice for writers of this nonfiction genre. Immersion writing can be broken down into the broad categories of travel writing, immersion memoir, and immersion journalism. Using the work of such authors as Barbara Ehrenreich, Hunter S. Thompson, Ted Conover, A. J. Jacobs, Nellie Bly, Julio Cortazar, and James Agee, Hemley examines these three major types of immersion writing and further identifies the subcategories of the quest, the experiment, the investigation, the infiltration, and the reenactment. Included in the book are helpful exercises, models for immersion writing, and a chapter on one of the most fraught subjects for nonfiction writers—the ethics and legalities of writing about other people. A Field Guide for Immersion Writing recalibrates and redefines the way writers approach their relationship to their subjects. Suitable for beginners and advanced writers, the book provides an enlightening, provocative, and often amusing look at the ways in which nonfiction writers engage with the world around them. A Friends Fund Publication.
A guide to writing style for all reporters, feature writers, editors, and journalism students. Demonstrates sound professional techniques to give stories clarity, precision and polish.
This book is a cross between a manual and a textbook that is uncommonly fun to read. Learning to write well is a lifelong process, and Born speaks to writers of all levels in a language that is at one sophisticated and simple, teaching by example, making it look easy.
Best Newspaper Writing 1999 celebrates the winners of the ASNE Distinguished Writing Awards, including the Jesse Laventhol Awards, created to honor deadline reporting. Bartholomew Sullivan of The Commercial Appeal in Memphis, Tenn., relies on attention to detail and evocative prose to bring his readers to the heart of breaking news, whether it's the conviction of a Ku Klux Klan wizard for a three-decades-old murder of a black civil rights worker, the funeral of country music star Carl Perkins, or a tornado that devastates a small farm community in Arkansas. The News Tribune in Tacoma, Wash., re-creates a deadly avalanche on Mount Rainier through the accounts of those who survived the disaster, combining careful reporting, collaboration with visual journalists, and dramatic storytelling to reveal the human stories behind the news. DeNeen L. Brown of The Washington Post blends meticulous reporting with lyrical and incisive writing in a collection of extraordinary stories that tackle emotionally charged topics such as abortion, racial equality, juvenile justice, and modern-day parenting with honest sensitivity and literary grace. J. Peder Zane of the Raleigh News & Observer provides uncommon insights in columns that use the prism of books to offer provocative commentary on topics as diverse as genocide and slavery, the value of fiction, and the modern curse of tell-all memoirs. Bailey Thomson of the Mobile Register (Ala.) indicts his home state in a blistering series of editorials about failures in education, environment, and political courage that also furnishes an effective catalog of solutions drawn from neighboring states. Mirta Ojito of The New York Times provides apenetrating first-person account of changes in her native Cuba in a powerful example of foreign reporting honored for its ability to help readers understand the impact of international news on their own lives.

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