How did the delphinium get its name? Which parts of the body lend their names to auriculas and orchids? Who are the gentian, lobelia and heuchera named after? Why are nasturtiums and antirrhinums connected? What does an everlasting pea have to do with Indian miniature paintings? These are some of the questions answered in Peter Parker's adventurous exploration of the mysteries of Botanical Latin. Evolved over many centuries and often thought to belong to the rarefied world of scholars and scientists, this invented language is in fact a very useful tool for everyday gardening. It allows us to find our way around nurseries; it sorts out confusions when two plants have the same English name; and it gives us all kinds of information about how big or small a plant will grow, what shape or colour it will develop, and what habitat it prefers. In his lively survey, Parker agues that Botanical Latin is not merely useful, but fun. The naming of plants draws upon geography, social and medical history, folklore, mythology, language, literature, the human body, the animal kingdom and all manner of ancient beliefs and superstitions. The book, beautifully illustrated with old woodcuts, explains how and why plants have been named, includes handy lists of identifying adjectives, and takes the reader down some of the stranger byways of human endeavour and eccentricity.
Since Latin became the standard language for plant naming in the eighteenth century, it has been intrinsically linked with botany. And while mastery of the classical language may not be a prerequisite for tending perennials, all gardeners stand to benefit from learning a bit of Latin and its conventions in the field. Without it, they might buy a Hellebores foetidus and be unprepared for its fetid smell, or a Potentilla reptans with the expectation that it will stand straight as a sentinel rather than creep along the ground. An essential addition to the gardener’s library, this colorful, fully illustrated book details the history of naming plants, provides an overview of Latin naming conventions, and offers guidelines for pronunciation. Readers will learn to identify Latin terms that indicate the provenance of a given plant and provide clues to its color, shape, fragrance, taste, behavior, functions, and more. Full of expert instruction and practical guidance, Latin for Gardeners will allow novices and green thumbs alike to better appreciate the seemingly esoteric names behind the plants they work with, and to expertly converse with fellow enthusiasts. Soon they will realize that having a basic understanding of Latin before trips to the nursery or botanic garden is like possessing some knowledge of French before traveling to Paris; it enriches the whole experience.
The Little Book of Little Gardens is an artistic demonstration and playful collection of Steve Wheen, the internationally acclaimed `Pot Hole Gardener', whom The Sun describes as the 'Banksy of guerilla gardening'. This collection brings his best work to life, creating a photographic journey through some of London's most iconic locations. These tiny gardens are sure enough to brighten anyone's day and cause imaginations to wander. Initially begun as a simple way to beautify Wheen's East London neighbourhood, these little gardens have captured the attention of the world.
Every gardener needs to know their Latin names. They may look confusing at first, but once you understand what certain key words mean, impenetrable-sounding and hard-to-pronounce species names are suddenly demystified. Many Latin names hide the secrets of where the plant is found, its colour, flowering times, leaf pattern, natural habitat and all sorts of other information that's extremely useful to the gardener: if you want a plant for a shady place, choose one with a name ending in sylvestris ('of woods'), while if your garden is dry, look out for the suffix epigeios ('of dry places'). More than just a dictionary of plant names, this fascinating book explains the meaning of hundreds of Latin plant terms, grouped into handily themed sections such as plants that are named after famous women, plants that are named after the shape of their leaves, plants that are named after their fragrance or the time of year that they flower. Within these pages you'll learn that Digitalis purpurea (the common foxglove) is purple, that the sanguineum in Geranium sanguineum means 'bloody' (its common name is the bloody cranesbill), and to steer clear of any plant whose Latin name ends in infestus.
There was once a little gardener and his garden meant everything to him. He worked hard, very hard, but he was just too little (or at least he felt he was). In this gentle, beautiful tale, Emily Hughes, the celebrated author of Wild, departs from the larger than life Wild-girl of her debut to pursue a littler than life Gardener, in a story that teaches us just how important it is to persist and try, no matter what the odds. With delicately woven tapestries of illustrated magic, Hughes once again transports us to a world not unlike our own, while still brimming with fantasy and wonder.
In today's South, where fine gardening is a tradition, many homeowners and professional gardeners are discovering a vast new palette of plant materials—native plants. They are realizing that these native wildflowers, trees, shrubs, groundcovers, vines, and grasses are far better suited, and therefore easier to grow and maintain, than most of the imported plants that populate traditional landscapes. Discover the Wasowskis' exciting vision of the many possibilities and advantages of going native.
You’re now officially out of excuses for not planting the garden of your dreams. Even if you’ve never sowed a seed nor pulled a weed, Gardening Basics For Dummies contains everything you need to know about flowers, beds, borders, trees, shrubs, and lawns to create your own private paradise. This friendly and informative guide also covers all of the tools and additives available to make gardening easier. You’ll discover: Clear definitions and descriptions of the different types of plants Tips on choosing the type of garden you want How to create a garden plan Easy-to-follow instructions for soil preparation Advice on planting, growing and caring for annuals and perennials Step-by-step plans for organic and edible gardens Plans for butterfly and children's gardens Packed with helpful tips on controlling pests safely, managing weeds, and correcting common gardening problems, Gardening for Dummies turns your brown thumb green in a hurry.
Stearn's classic dictionary of the meaning and origin of some 6,000 botanical names
RHS Practical Latin for Gardeners is a unique guide to plant binomials based on the bestselling RHS Latin for Gardeners. It contains 1,500 of the most useful and most widespread Latin names, organized into thematic chapters including Colour, Size, Form and Habitat. Each chapter is further subdivided into smaller groups, such as large plants and small plants. This allows gardeners to make new connections and discoveries in a way standard alphabetical lists don't permit. 'Behind the Name' feature boxes further increase the book's practical value, and a wide range of botanical watercolours ensure that it is beautiful as well as functional. This book includes a definition and pronunciation guide for each word, as well as a 16-page alphabetical index, so that it can still be used as a conventional dictionary of Latin names. And its handy, pocket-sized format makes it the perfect gift.
For more than a decade, gardeners have been turning to a beautiful little hardcover book called Gardener's Latin, by Bill Neal. Neal understood that as Latin terms began appearing with increasing frequency on nursery tags and gardening catalogs, gardeners would need help. So he weeded through the Latin words that describe and distinguish among plants and flowers and compiled a volume of select, brief, clear definitions. Gardener's Latin leads us down the path from abbreviatus to zonatus, turning aside here and there along the way for little-known horticultural facts and fables and the wisdom of gardeners from Virgil to Vita Sackville-West.“/DIV>
A collection of columns by an American garden writer includes practical information about vegetable and flower gardens, as well as reflections on how gardens feed the human soul
Make the most of your balconies and windowsills with this handy gardening guide from the author of the award-winning RHS Grow Your Own Crops in Pots. RHS Little Book of Small-space Gardening is packed with practical information and inspirational ideas for anyone who wants to grow plants in a variety of outside spaces, from balconies to stairways, windowsills to doorsteps. Look inside to discover a host of creative step-by-step projects, such as speedy salads, wildlife pots, fragrant baskets and green garden walls. Handy plant profiles tell you what's best to grow in a variety of conditions, such as wind, shade and drought. Whether you choose to start with a simple pot or tackle a more ambitious project, with this beautifully illustrated book you'll soon see how even the smallest spaces can be amazing growing spaces.
Legend tells us that the first garden was born at the foot of a tree. As a mark of respect, the area around it was swept, and so it became sacred. Gardens - places where nature is imitated and ordered by human intervention - have been a part of history since the days of ancient Mesopotamia. Harmony is the key component, and this book invokes this harmony on every page. Illustrated with a magnificent array of photos and antique botanical prints, Morocco in Bloom is more than just a celebration of Moroccan flora. It is also a practical manual, dedicated to the cultivation, creation and maintenance of southern Mediterranean gardens. The author's words will resonate with any garden lover based in the broader Mediterranean Basin, from Spain to Greece, Provence to Tunisia. The book has been composed in the style of an almanac, guiding the reader through the year month by month. Each chapter provides vital advice on how to plant, prune and care for the most beautiful and rare plants in the Mediterranean climate region. AUTHOR: Giuppi Petromarchi is a renowned Italian landscape designer, a specialist in Mediterranean botany and the creator of numerous gardens in Tuscany and elsewhere. She has authored many books on the history of Italian gardens and on Mediterranean flora, including the lauded botanical text for The Gardens of Ninfa, and has also regularly contributed articles to gardening magazines. From 1986-1989 she lived in Rabat, where her husband was the Italian Ambassador to Morocco. It was then that she discovered the rich beauty of the Moroccan garden. Giulio Pietromarchi began his work as an assistant photographer in Rome, aged 16. That year he met Niki de Saint Phalle, who, having seen his work, asked him to document her Tarot Garden in Tuscany. His photographs span the 27 years it took to realise the project. Their long collaboration led him to document the artist's work around the world, resulting in many publications. He began his film career in 1983 as a director of photography. His filmography includes more than sixty films and documentaries. SELLING POINTS: * A beautifully illustrated reference book for any gardener working in the Mediterranean climate * Intersperses important tips on plant care and garden design with stunning photography * Laid out in an accessible month-by-month 'almanac' style 137 colour illustrations
Introducing budding young greenthumbs to the good dirty fun of gardening This adorable little book is crammed fuller than a worm farm with all of the gardening basics - what plants are, what they eat, how they grow, and who the goody and baddy insects are in your garden
Russell Page was one of the most famous landscape gardeners in Europe. This is his classic text describing his training and the making of his many and celebrated gardens. Written in clear, elegant prose, illustrated with a substantial photographic section, this edition boasts pictures by Marina Schinz of Russell Page's gardens in a more mature form and hitherto unpublished photographs from the author's files with a foreword and captions by Fred Whitsey, gardening correspondent to the Daily Telegraph.
First published in 1931 by renowned horticulturalist Arthur Johnson, Plant Names Simplified has become an established classic. Presented in a glossary format, this pocket-sized reference book gives the name, pronunciation, and classification of common plants and the meaning behind the Latin origins of the name. This enables the reader to learn how the terms should be spelled and pronounced correctly, and provides an explanation of why plants like Helianthus hirsutus is so called-because it is hairy! Plant Names Simplified 3rd Edition will be a reliable resource for gardeners of all abilities, park managers, botanists, ecologists, garden designers and horticultural practitioners, and students. [Subject: Botany]
The Brief Life of Flowers is an ode to the flowers that fill our countrysides, our woodlands and our homes. Part nature writing, part memoir, Fiona Stafford explores Britain's flora, as well as the literature and lore that surrounds it. From snowdrops and sunflowers, to pansies and poppies, this beautifully illustrated book is a delightful companion through the landscapes of Britain's floral history.
This is the container gardening book that real gardeners have been waiting for - a practical as well as creative guide to planting and maintaining every type of garden container including pots, troughs, hanging baskets and window boxes. Paul Williams, a former head gardener with years of experience at a variety of gardens, and now a highly regarded author and lecturer, offers professional advice on innovative combinations that really work, while providing the essential knowledge required to care for plants all-year-round. Every container in this book was especially planted and tended by Paul Williams. The majority of the combinations took weeks or even months to come to perfection and throughout the author shares his cultivation methods and professional secrets for lasting success.
Over 3,000 botanical terms explored and explained. An accessible, informative, and beautifully illustrated guide to the mysteries of botanical terms and the science of plants.
A witty tribute to the history, construction and joyousness of the Latin names that describe our natural world Latin names - frequently unpronounceable, all too often wrong and always a tiny puzzle to unravel - have been annoying the layman since they first became formalised as scientific terms in the eighteenth century. Why on earth has the entirely land-loving Eastern Mole been named Scalopus aquaticus, or the Oxford Ragwort been called Senecio squalidus -- 'dirty old man'? What were naturalists thinking when they called a beetle Agra katewinsletae, a genus of fish Batman, and a Trilobite Han solo? Why is zoology replete with names such as Chloris chloris chloris (the greenfinch), and Gorilla gorilla gorilla (a species of, well gorilla)? The Naming of the Shrew will unveil these mysteries, exploring the history, celebrating their poetic nature and revealing how naturalists sometimes get things so terribly wrong. With wonderfully witty style and captivating narrative, this book will make you see Latin names in a whole new light.

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