A Little Dam Problem chronicles an epic fight over water rights between the State of Idaho and Idaho Power Company. A court decision in 1982 gave Idaho Power virtual control over the flow of the Snake River in southern Idaho. An unlikely political teamDemocrat Governor John Evans and Republican Attorney General Jim Jonesjoined with legislators and water users to undo the damage caused by the decision. Jim Jones brings readers into the midst of the battle, providing an insider view of the struggle between the State of Idaho and a politically powerful adversary. The story reads much like those old western movies where a powerful landowner grabs up all of the water resources, depriving sodbuster families of the precious resource. The book opens a window into the real world of government and politics
Orval Hansen's life has taken him around the world; from the deck of a Navy ship in World War II to the London School of Economics; from the Idaho State Legislature to the United States House of Representatives; from a farm in Idaho Falls to the top of Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. Hansen dedicated his life to the service of Idaho, to his loving wife of more than 60 years and to his seven children. His story exemplifies how one determined man can climb the mountains life places in his path and make his state and world a better place.
In the scramble to claim water rights in the West during the fevered days of early emigration and expansion, running out of water was rarely a concern, and the dam building fever that transformed the West in the 19th and 20th centuries created a map of the region that may be unsustainable. Throughout the arid American West, metropolitan areas such as Los Angeles, Phoenix, Las Vegas and Denver need water. These cities are growing, but water supplies are dwindling. Scientists agree that the West is heating up and drying out, leading to future water shortages that will pose a challenge to existing laws. Dam Nation looks first to the past, to the stories of the California gold rush and the earliest attempts by men to shape the landscape and tame it, takes us to the “Great American Desert” and the settlement of the west under the theory that "rain follows the plow," and then takes on the ongoing legal and moral battles in the West. Author Stephen Grace, is a novelist, a storyteller, and the author of several non-fiction books on Colorado. He weaves the facts into a compelling narrative that informs, entertains, and tells an important story.
The bear has a problem. He asks everyone for help, but no one seems to have time to talk with him. What will it take to get someone listen to him?
Introduction : the cultures of water sovereignty in New Mexico -- Unsettled waters : how water adjudication works, what it does, and what happens when it fails -- The production of water expertise, the adjudication-industrial complex and its consequences -- Adjudicating the unknown future of New Mexico's water
Focusing on the Snake River in Washington state, looks at the actions being taken to remove federally-funded hydroelectric dams from America's waterways and details the environmental, economic, and scientific benefits of dam removal and the powerful interests resisting this movement.
DIVEven today, thirty years after the legal battles to save the endangered snail darter, the little fish that blocked completion of a TVA dam is still invoked as an icon of leftist extremism and governmental foolishness. In this eye-opening book, the lawyer who with his students fought and won the Supreme Court case—known officially as Tennessee Valley Authority v. Hill—tells the hidden story behind one of the nation’s most significant environmental law battles. /divDIV The realities of the darter’s case, Plater asserts, have been consistently mischaracterized in politics and the media. This book offers a detailed account of the six-year crusade against a pork-barrel project that made no economic sense and was flawed from the start. In reality TVA’s project was designed for recreation and real estate development. And at the heart of the little group fighting the project in the courts and Congress were family farmers trying to save their homes and farms, most of which were to be resold in a corporate land development scheme. Plater’s gripping tale of citizens navigating the tangled corridors of national power stimulates important questions about our nation’s governance, and at last sets the snail darter’s record straight. /div
American is facing a water crisis and nowhere is this more evident than in the West where significant problems abound. How are we responding to this rapidly growing crisis? We're not. Deadbeat Dams reveals the desperate need to change western water policies and exposes the public to the lack of common sense, corruption, and utter waste of taxpayer's money that the author witnessed over a long government career spanning four decades. The faults of the present system of federally assisted water management efforts are amply detailed, and an agenda for reform is provided that can be used as ammunition by a new generation of water reformers. Book jacket.
An inspirational introduction to the ideas of the Craftivist Collective; a worldwide group of activists using craft as their medium.
"If the wars of the last century were fought over oil, the wars of this century will be fought over water." -Ismail Serageldin, The World Bank The giant dams of today are the modern Pyramids, colossally expensive edifices that generate monumental amounts of electricity, irrigated water, and environmental and social disaster. With Deep Water, Jacques Leslie offers a searching account of the current crisis over dams and the world's water. An emerging master of long-form reportage, Leslie makes the crisis vivid through the stories of three distinctive figures: Medha Patkar, an Indian activist who opposes a dam that will displace thousands of people in western India; Thayer Scudder, an American anthropologist who studies the effects of giant dams on the peoples of southern Africa; and Don Blackmore, an Australian water manager who struggles to reverse the effects of drought so as to allow Australia to continue its march to California-like prosperity. Taking the reader to the sites of controversial dams, Leslie shows why dams are at once the hope of developing nations and a blight on their people and landscape. Deep Water is an incisive, beautifully written, and deeply disquieting report on a conflict that threatens to divide the world in the coming years.
"Superbly reported and written with clarity, insight, and great skill." —Washington Post Book World After two decades, Washington Post journalist Blaine Harden returned to his small-town birthplace in the Pacific Northwest to follow the rise and fall of the West’s most thoroughly conquered river. To explore the Columbia River and befriend those who collaborated in its destruction, he traveled on a monstrous freight barge sailing west from Idaho to the Grand Coulee Dam, the site of the river’s harnessing for the sake of jobs, electricity, and irrigation. A River Lost is a searing personal narrative of rediscovery joined with a narrative of exploitation: of Native Americans, of endangered salmon, of nuclear waste, and of a once-wild river. Updated throughout, this edition features a new foreword and afterword.
One of the main concerns for digital photographers today is asset management: how to file, find, protect, and re-use their photos. The best solutions can be found in The DAM Book, our bestselling guide to managing digital images efficiently and effectively. Anyone who shoots, scans, or stores digital photographs is practicing digital asset management (DAM), but few people do it in a way that makes sense. In this second edition, photographer Peter Krogh -- the leading expert on DAM -- provides new tools and techniques to help professionals, amateurs, and students: Understand the image file lifecycle: from shooting to editing, output, and permanent storage Learn new ways to use metadata and key words to track photo files Create a digital archive and name files clearly Determine a strategy for backing up and validating image data Learn a catalog workflow strategy, using Adobe Bridge, Camera Raw, Adobe Lightroom, Microsoft Expression Media, and Photoshop CS4 together Migrate images from one file format to another, from one storage medium to another, and from film to digital Learn how to copyright images To identify and protect your images in the marketplace, having a solid asset management system is essential. The DAM Book offers the best approach.
Aunt Chip saves the town of Triple Creek, where everyone has forgotten how to read because of the invasion of television.
This California Natural History Guide addresses the need to educate the citizenry of California on crucial environmental issues by presenting a primer on the state's most important natural resource.
This refreshingly original, contemporary YA debut centers on Rooney, a teen girl struggling to hold her family together in the face of her mother's delusions.
An eye-opening account of where our water comes from and where it all goes. The Colorado River is an essential resource for a surprisingly large part of the United States, and every gallon that flows down it is owned or claimed by someone. David Owen traces all that water from the Colorado’s headwaters to its parched terminus, once a verdant wetland but now a million-acre desert. He takes readers on an adventure downriver, along a labyrinth of waterways, reservoirs, power plants, farms, fracking sites, ghost towns, and RV parks, to the spot near the U.S.–Mexico border where the river runs dry. Water problems in the western United States can seem tantalizingly easy to solve: just turn off the fountains at the Bellagio, stop selling hay to China, ban golf, cut down the almond trees, and kill all the lawyers. But a closer look reveals a vast man-made ecosystem that is far more complex and more interesting than the headlines let on. The story Owen tells in Where the Water Goes is crucial to our future: how a patchwork of engineering marvels, byzantine legal agreements, aging infrastructure, and neighborly cooperation enables life to flourish in the desert —and the disastrous consequences we face when any part of this tenuous system fails.
Now available in paperback, this fascinating book presents scenarios for the broad trends that will have a significant impact upon future water challenges. Population growth and unchallenged water use have brought us to the brink of a worldwide water crisis. Examine what the next 100 years may bring to water use, prices, and availability--and how individuals, water utilities, industries, and countries can change the future of water. Discussions include: On home use-Grass species that live on common seawater, clothes washers that use a cup of water per load--or no water at all, UV-light dishwashers; On agricultural use - Packaging, “Irrigated with natural rainfall, no fossil waters used.”; On industrial use - Old industrial cities in the rainy northeast US that have been shrinking and decaying for decades may experience revitalization; On water storage - America is tearing down many old dams, while China and Africa are on dam-building binges. What are the alternatives? On the role of water - Rivers, lakes, and aquifers cross political borders, creating conflicts. Learn about many innovative technologies and creative solutions to water problems. (Hardcover ISBN 9781583218099 published in 2011)
Four irate rebels join forces to wage war on the stripminers, clear-cutters, and the highway and dam and bridge builders who are turning their natural habitat into a wasteland. A new Introduction by historian Brinkley puts this enduring cult classic in perspective by placing it at the forefront of an important historical movement.
"Nothing is more important to life than water, and no one knows water better than Sandra Postel. Replenish is a wise, sobering, but ultimately hopeful book." —Elizabeth Kolbert "Clear-eyed treatise...Postel makes her case eloquently." —Booklist, starred review "An informative, purposeful argument." —Kirkus We have disrupted the natural water cycle for centuries in an effort to control water for our own prosperity. Yet every year, recovery from droughts and floods costs billions of dollars, and we spend billions more on dams, diversions, levees, and other feats of engineering. These massive projects not only are risky financially and environmentally, they often threaten social and political stability. What if the answer was not further control of the water cycle, but repair and replenishment? Sandra Postel takes readers around the world to explore water projects that work with, rather than against, nature’s rhythms. In New Mexico, forest rehabilitation is safeguarding drinking water; along the Mississippi River, farmers are planting cover crops to reduce polluted runoff; and in China, “sponge cities” are capturing rainwater to curb urban flooding. Efforts like these will be essential as climate change disrupts both weather patterns and the models on which we base our infrastructure. We will be forced to adapt. The question is whether we will continue to fight the water cycle or recognize our place in it and take advantage of the inherent services nature offers. Water, Postel writes, is a gift, the source of life itself. How will we use this greatest of gifts?
Set against a backdrop of frozen canals in a winter wonderland, the year's most exciting event in a little Dutch village is about to take place. But will Hans Brinker and his sister Gretel, with their hand-carved wooden skates, be able to compete against their well-trained young friends who own fine steel blades?

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