A Little Dam Problem chronicles an epic fight over water rights between the State of Idaho and Idaho Power Company. A court decision in 1982 gave Idaho Power virtual control over the flow of the Snake River in southern Idaho. An unlikely political teamDemocrat Governor John Evans and Republican Attorney General Jim Jonesjoined with legislators and water users to undo the damage caused by the decision. Jim Jones brings readers into the midst of the battle, providing an insider view of the struggle between the State of Idaho and a politically powerful adversary. The story reads much like those old western movies where a powerful landowner grabs up all of the water resources, depriving sodbuster families of the precious resource. The book opens a window into the real world of government and politics
In the American West, water adjudication lawsuits are adversarial, expensive, and lengthy. Unsettled Waters is the first detailed study of water adjudications in New Mexico. The state envisioned adjudication as a straightforward accounting of water rights as private property. However, adjudication resurfaced tensions and created conflicts among water sovereigns at multiple scales. Based on more than ten years of fieldwork, this book tells a fascinating story of resistance involving communal water cultures, Native rights and cleaved identities, clashing experts, and unintended outcomes. Whether the state can alter adjudications to meet the water demands in the twenty-first century will have serious consequences.
Under the auspices of the 1938 Flood Control Act, the U.S. Corps of Engineers began to pursue an aggressive dam-building campaign. A grateful public generally lauded their efforts, but when they turned their attention to Arkansas’s Buffalo River, the vocal opposition their proposed projects generated dumbfounded them. Never before had anyone challenged the Corps’s assumption that damming a river was an improvement. Led by Neil Compton, a physician in Bentonville, Arkansas, a group of area conservationists formed the Ozark Society to join the battle for the Buffalo. This book is the account of this decade-long struggle that drew in such political figures as supreme court justice William O. Douglas, Senator J. William Fulbright, and Governor Orval Faubus. The battle finally ended in 1972 with President Richard Nixon’s designation of the Buffalo as the first national river. Drawing on hundreds of personal letters, photographs, maps, newspaper articles, and reminiscences, Compton’s lively book details the trials, gains, setbacks, and ultimate triumph in one of the first major skirmishes between environmentalists and developers.
Gilbert White has been called the most renowned geographer internationally of the twentieth century, and one who personifies the ideal of a natural resources scientist committed to the stewardship of our planet. He has educated the nation and the world on how to change the ways we manage water resources, mitigate natural hazards, and assess the environment.
Have you ever wondered how many servings of fish and chips are sold in the UK every year? Why women, on average, catch bigger fish than men? Or what the last meal served onboard the Titanic consisted of? If so, enjoy this second helping of The Little Book of the Sea series, which gathers together facts, figures, lore and trivia about all things edible from the sea. From recipes gathered from around the world, to instructions for eating pufferfish (the world's deadliest delicacy), to the official explanation of how Popeye the Sailor discovered the strength-enhancing capabilities of spinach, The Little Book of the Sea: Food and Drink contains a smorgasbord of useful, useless and altogether intriguing information. So tie on a bib and pull up a chair - we're serving up a feast of delicious details about the ocean's greatest bounty: seafood!
Presents cross-referenced essays on basic topics related to planetology and Earth from space; each essay includes an annotated bibliography.
This is an explicit ecological model through which Abruzzi explains successful Mormon colonization of the Colorado River Basin in northeastern Arizona. His model is an adaptation of the general model developed by plant and animal ecologists to account for the evolution of complex ecological communities. Using a detailed systematic materialist analysis, Abruzzi explains several specific historical developments associated with the settlement process. Contents: Introduction; Colonizing the Little Colorado River Basin; The Evolution of Ecological Communities; The Little Colorado River Basin; Dam Construction; Exploiting Environmental Diversity; External Impacts on the Settlement Process; Conclusion; Maps, Tables and Figures throughout.
The development of water resources is a key element in the socio-economic development of many regions in the world. Water availability and rainfall are unequally distributed both in space and time, so dams play a vital role, there being few viable alternatives for storing water. Dams hold a prime place in satisfying the ever-increasing demand for power, irrigation and drinking water, for protection of man, property and environment from catastrophic floods, and for regulating the flow of rivers. Dams have contributed to the development of civilization for over 2,000 years. Worldwide there are some 45,000 large dams listed by ICOLD, which have a height over 15 meters. Today, in western countries, where most of the water resources have been developed, the safety of the existing dams and measures for extending their economical life are of prime concern. In developing countries the focus is on the construction of new dams. The proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Dam Engineering includes contributions from 18 countries, and provides an overview of the state-of-the-art in hydropower development, new type dams, new materials and new technologies, dam and environment. Traditional areas, such as concrete dams and embankment dams, methods of analysis and design of dams, dam foundation, seismic analysis, design and safety, stability of dam and slope, dam safety monitoring and instrumentation, dam maintenance, and rehabilitation and heightening are also considered. The book is of special interest to scientists, researchers, engineers, and students working in dam engineering, dam design, hydropower development, environmental engineering, and structural hydraulics.
From semitropical coastal areas to high mountain terrain, from swampy lowlands to modern cities, the environment holds a fundamental importance in shaping the character of the American South. This volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture surveys the dynamic environmental forces that have shaped human culture in the region--and the ways humans have shaped their environment. Articles examine how the South's ecology, physiography, and climate have influenced southerners--not only as a daily fact of life but also as a metaphor for understanding culture and identity. This volume includes ninety-eight essays that explore--both broadly and specifically--elements of the southern environment. Thematic overviews address subjects such as plants, animals, energy use and development, and natural disasters. Shorter topical entries feature familiar species such as the alligator, the ivory-billed woodpecker, kudzu, and the mockingbird. Also covered are important individuals in southern environmental history and prominent places in the landscape, such as the South's national parks and seashores. New articles cover contemporary issues in land use and conservation, environmental protection, and the current status of the flora and fauna widely associated with the South.
Race. God. Two forces that have oppressed David's life from the beginning. As he grows, they follow him, bearing down upon his neck like a yoke. But someone else follows him as well. There is an appointed time for them to meet. Race. God. Growing up biracial is hard for David, being the son of an overbearing black mother and a passive white father. They've pulled him from an all-black world into an all-white one. But someone is there also. There is an appointed time for them to meet. Race. God. David eventually learns to throw the shackles of both away, to lash out against anything racial, or religious. He changes. Grows angrier. hates more. Still, that someone is there, watching. Waiting. Emily. But Emily couldn't wait any longer. Her love for David couldn't be contained until that "appointed" time. She takes matters into her own hands, and makes her presence known. In an attempt to win his love, she dons his clothes and engages in his interests. But sadly, her plan backfires, and everything turns disasterous---and she is left, damaged and alone. Race. God. Emily. Years pass. Time shifts. When they do meet, it is a meeting like no other. The rapture they feel for one another surpasses the drudgedness of their station. For David, life couldn't be imagined without her; and at such a time as this, she is taken away from him. Is it a scrifice, or some unfortunate circumstance? She leaves someone in her stead, to continue with him where she left off. Someone who cares just as much as she had. Someone who loved him from the beginning, just as she had. God. It is only then that David realizes who Emily really was, and how much he'd failed to understand.
Includes, as a separate section, reprints from Public utilities reports, annotated 1928-33, and from Public utilities reports (new series) 1934-
HUNTED. TRAPPED. DESPERATE. Shipwrecked after a ferocious storm, Hanna, Ned and Jik come face to face with a murderous foe. They must escape or die. But how do you outrun a bullet . . . Or out swim a shark?
Introduces problem-solving skills and steps and shows how to apply them to example problems related to the Hoover Dam.
Saving All the Parts is a journalist's exploration of the intertwining of endangered species protection and the economic future of resource dependent communities -- those with local economies based on fishing, logging, ranching, mining, and other resource intensive industries. Rocky Barker presents an insightful overview of current endangered species controversies and a comprehensive look at the wide-ranging implications of human activities.The book analyzes trends in natural resource management, land use planning, and economic development that can lead to a future where economic activity can be sustained without the loss of essential natural values. Throughout, Barker provides a thorough and balanced analysis of both the ecological and economic forces that affect the lives and livelihoods of the nation's inhabitants -- both human and animal.
DIVThe untold story of a notorious environmental case and the citizen crusade that carried a little fish through Washington politics and the Supreme Court/div

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