A Little Dam Problem chronicles an epic fight over water rights between the State of Idaho and Idaho Power Company. A court decision in 1982 gave Idaho Power virtual control over the flow of the Snake River in southern Idaho. An unlikely political teamDemocrat Governor John Evans and Republican Attorney General Jim Jonesjoined with legislators and water users to undo the damage caused by the decision. Jim Jones brings readers into the midst of the battle, providing an insider view of the struggle between the State of Idaho and a politically powerful adversary. The story reads much like those old western movies where a powerful landowner grabs up all of the water resources, depriving sodbuster families of the precious resource. The book opens a window into the real world of government and politics
In the American West, water adjudication lawsuits are adversarial, expensive, and lengthy. Unsettled Waters is the first detailed study of water adjudications in New Mexico. The state envisioned adjudication as a straightforward accounting of water rights as private property. However, adjudication resurfaced tensions and created conflicts among water sovereigns at multiple scales. Based on more than ten years of fieldwork, this book tells a fascinating story of resistance involving communal water cultures, Native rights and cleaved identities, clashing experts, and unintended outcomes. Whether the state can alter adjudications to meet the water demands in the twenty-first century will have serious consequences.
Gilbert White has been called the most renowned geographer internationally of the twentieth century, and one who personifies the ideal of a natural resources scientist committed to the stewardship of our planet. He has educated the nation and the world on how to change the ways we manage water resources, mitigate natural hazards, and assess the environment.
Under the auspices of the 1938 Flood Control Act, the U.S. Corps of Engineers began to pursue an aggressive dam-building campaign. A grateful public generally lauded their efforts, but when they turned their attention to Arkansas’s Buffalo River, the vocal opposition their proposed projects generated dumbfounded them. Never before had anyone challenged the Corps’s assumption that damming a river was an improvement. Led by Neil Compton, a physician in Bentonville, Arkansas, a group of area conservationists formed the Ozark Society to join the battle for the Buffalo. This book is the account of this decade-long struggle that drew in such political figures as supreme court justice William O. Douglas, Senator J. William Fulbright, and Governor Orval Faubus. The battle finally ended in 1972 with President Richard Nixon’s designation of the Buffalo as the first national river. Drawing on hundreds of personal letters, photographs, maps, newspaper articles, and reminiscences, Compton’s lively book details the trials, gains, setbacks, and ultimate triumph in one of the first major skirmishes between environmentalists and developers.
This is an explicit ecological model through which Abruzzi explains successful Mormon colonization of the Colorado River Basin in northeastern Arizona. His model is an adaptation of the general model developed by plant and animal ecologists to account for the evolution of complex ecological communities. Using a detailed systematic materialist analysis, Abruzzi explains several specific historical developments associated with the settlement process. Contents: Introduction; Colonizing the Little Colorado River Basin; The Evolution of Ecological Communities; The Little Colorado River Basin; Dam Construction; Exploiting Environmental Diversity; External Impacts on the Settlement Process; Conclusion; Maps, Tables and Figures throughout.
DIVThe untold story of a notorious environmental case and the citizen crusade that carried a little fish through Washington politics and the Supreme Court/div
Race. God. Two forces that have oppressed David's life from the beginning. As he grows, they follow him, bearing down upon his neck like a yoke. But someone else follows him as well. There is an appointed time for them to meet. Race. God. Growing up biracial is hard for David, being the son of an overbearing black mother and a passive white father. They've pulled him from an all-black world into an all-white one. But someone is there also. There is an appointed time for them to meet. Race. God. David eventually learns to throw the shackles of both away, to lash out against anything racial, or religious. He changes. Grows angrier. hates more. Still, that someone is there, watching. Waiting. Emily. But Emily couldn't wait any longer. Her love for David couldn't be contained until that "appointed" time. She takes matters into her own hands, and makes her presence known. In an attempt to win his love, she dons his clothes and engages in his interests. But sadly, her plan backfires, and everything turns disasterous---and she is left, damaged and alone. Race. God. Emily. Years pass. Time shifts. When they do meet, it is a meeting like no other. The rapture they feel for one another surpasses the drudgedness of their station. For David, life couldn't be imagined without her; and at such a time as this, she is taken away from him. Is it a scrifice, or some unfortunate circumstance? She leaves someone in her stead, to continue with him where she left off. Someone who cares just as much as she had. Someone who loved him from the beginning, just as she had. God. It is only then that David realizes who Emily really was, and how much he'd failed to understand.
Includes, as a separate section, reprints from Public utilities reports, annotated 1928-33, and from Public utilities reports (new series) 1934-
The development of water resources is a key element in the socio-economic development of many regions in the world. Water availability and rainfall are unequally distributed both in space and time, so dams play a vital role, there being few viable alternatives for storing water. Dams hold a prime place in satisfying the ever-increasing demand for power, irrigation and drinking water, for protection of man, property and environment from catastrophic floods, and for regulating the flow of rivers. Dams have contributed to the development of civilization for over 2,000 years. Worldwide there are some 45,000 large dams listed by ICOLD, which have a height over 15 meters. Today, in western countries, where most of the water resources have been developed, the safety of the existing dams and measures for extending their economical life are of prime concern. In developing countries the focus is on the construction of new dams. The proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Dam Engineering includes contributions from 18 countries, and provides an overview of the state-of-the-art in hydropower development, new type dams, new materials and new technologies, dam and environment. Traditional areas, such as concrete dams and embankment dams, methods of analysis and design of dams, dam foundation, seismic analysis, design and safety, stability of dam and slope, dam safety monitoring and instrumentation, dam maintenance, and rehabilitation and heightening are also considered. The book is of special interest to scientists, researchers, engineers, and students working in dam engineering, dam design, hydropower development, environmental engineering, and structural hydraulics.
Settled in 1872 by Spanish pioneers from New Mexico, the town of St. Johns began as a farming and sheep-raising community far removed from the county seat and territorial capital of Prescott. Soon after, the Mormon Church, represented by Bishop David King Udall, purchased 1,200 acres for Mormon colonizers to settle. With the building of the Lyman Dam, the town was finally able to provide adequate water for crops and began to thrive. The building of a power plant in the 1970s doubled the population of St. Johns, but many of the original settlers' descendants are still there as well, canning their gardens' harvest and dusting from their homes the dirt brought in by the wind that never stops blowing. Although the streets are now paved and many of the old buildings and homes have long been razed, St. Johns has a unique story to tell.
Harvey details the first major clash between conservationists and developers after World War II, the successful fight to prevent the building of Echo Park Dam. The dam on the Green River was intended to create a recreational lake in northwest Colorado and generate hydroelectric power, but would have flooded picturesque Echo Park Valley and threatened Dinosaur National Monument, straddling the Utah-Colorado border near Wyoming.
HUNTED. TRAPPED. DESPERATE. Shipwrecked after a ferocious storm, Hanna, Ned and Jik come face to face with a murderous foe. They must escape or die. But how do you outrun a bullet . . . Or out swim a shark?
You can have the ability of saving money immediately!
This guidebook describes two treks in the Bernina region of the Swiss-Italian Alps. The Tour of the Bernina covers 119km in nine stages circling the Piz Bernina massif. Five days are spent in Switzerland and four in Italy, however a number of inviting extensions and detours are also described which add at least two days to the total. The tour is suitable for trekkers with basic alpine walking experience. While the highest point reached is 3002m, there are no glacier crossings en route. The Alta Via Valmalenco in Italy is a shorter, 8-stage trek over 94km, but is a more challenging route suitable for trekkers with more experience. Almost every stage of both treks can be accessed from a valley floor and public transport, opening the door to multiple variants and shorter treks. Detailed stage by stage route descriptions are given in combination with plenty of background and practical information.

Best Books