This Student Edition of A Memory of Two Mondays is perfect for students of literature and drama and offers an unrivalled and comprehensive guide to Miller's play. It features an extensive introduction by Joshua Polster which includes a chronology of Miller's life and times, a summary of the plot and commentary on the characters, themes, language, context and production history of the play. Together with over twenty questions for further study and detailed notes on words and phrases from the text, this is the definitive edition of the play. The one-act play A Memory of Two Mondays (1955) is one of Miller's most overtly autobiographical works. It chronicles the playwright at the age of eighteen during the early 1930s when he briefly worked at an auto parts warehouse in New York to save enough money to attend college. More than just autobiographical, the play captures the sociopolitical climate of the Great Depression. It deeply resonates and brings to the surface the cultural concerns and anxieties of the period. The setting, characters, theme, style, structure and language all exemplify the social and economic tensions of the country when it was at its lowest point in the Depression, and when the country, as Miller saw it, needed a sense of hope, endurance, and solidarity. At the same time, the play speaks to the 1950s, when the country was being torn apart by McCarthyism. A Memory of Two Mondays responded to a culture caught in the grip of a Communist hysteria that turned people against each other.
This Student Edition of A Memory of Two Mondays is perfect for students of literature and drama and offers an unrivalled and comprehensive guide to Miller's play. It features an extensive introduction by Joshua Polster which includes a chronology of Miller's life and times, a summary of the plot and commentary on the characters, themes, language, context and production history of the play. Together with over twenty questions for further study and detailed notes on words and phrases from the text, this is the definitive edition of the play. The one-act play A Memory of Two Mondays (1955) is one of Miller's most overtly autobiographical works. It chronicles the playwright at the age of eighteen during the early 1930s when he briefly worked at an auto parts warehouse in New York to save enough money to attend college. More than just autobiographical, the play captures the sociopolitical climate of the Great Depression. It deeply resonates and brings to the surface the cultural concerns and anxieties of the period. The setting, characters, theme, style, structure and language all exemplify the social and economic tensions of the country when it was at its lowest point in the Depression, and when the country, as Miller saw it, needed a sense of hope, endurance, and solidarity. At the same time, the play speaks to the 1950s, when the country was being torn apart by McCarthyism. A Memory of Two Mondays responded to a culture caught in the grip of a Communist hysteria that turned people against each other.
'Nothing in this book was written with greater love, and for myself I love nothing printed here better than this play' Arthur Miller. The one-act play A Memory of Two Mondays (1955) is one of Miller's most overtly autobiographical works. It chronicles the playwright at the age of eighteen during the early 1930s when he briefly worked at an auto parts warehouse in New York to save enough money to attend college. More than just autobiographical, the play captures the sociopolitical climate of the Great Depression. It resonates with and brings to the surface the cultural concerns and anxieties of the period. The setting, characters, theme, style, structure and language all exemplify the social and economic tensions of the country at its lowest ebb, when it needed a sense of hope, endurance, and solidarity. At the same time, the play speaks to the 1950s, when the country was being torn apart by McCarthyism. A Memory of Two Mondays responded to a culture caught in the grip of a Communist hysteria that turned people against each other. This scholarly edition is perfect for students. It features an extensive commentary on the context, themes, structure, style, language and characters, a survey of the play in production and questions for further study. Methuen Student Editions are expertly annotated texts of a wide range of plays from the modern and classic repertoires featuring extensive notes, commentary, further reading and questions for students.
Volume one in Methuen Drama's series of the definitive works of Arthur Miller.
Containing in full Miller's masterpieces "The Crucible" and "Death of a Salesman, " this collection comprises 60 years of writing from America's greatest living playwright.
In 1983 Arthur Miller was invited to direct Death of a Salesman at the Beijing People's Theatre, with Chinese actors. This was an entirely new experience for Miller and for the Chinese company, most of whom had never even heard of 'life insurance' or 'installment payments'. Miller had forty-eight days of rehearsals in which to direct his play and, while there, he kept a diary. This book tells the fascinating story of Miller's time in China and the paradoxes of directing a tragedy about American capitalism in a Communist country. First published in 1984 and re-issued in a new edition in 1991, 'Death of a Salesman' in Beijing is here given a new context as the production and process is investigated against the backdrop of twenty-first century China and its theatre, in a new introduction by Claire Conceison, Professor of Theater Studies at Duke University.
In Vichy France in 1942, eight men and a boy are seized by the collaborationist authorities and made to wait in a building that may be a police station. Some of them are Jews. All of them have something to hide—if not from the Nazis, then from their fellow detainees and, inevitably, from themselves. For in this claustrophobic antechamber to the death camps, everyone is guilty. And perhaps none more so than those who can walk away alive. In Incident at Vichy, Arthur Miller re-creates Dante's hell inside the gaping pit that is our history and populates it with sinners whose crimes are all the more fearful because they are so recognizable. "One of the most important plays of our time . . . Incident at Vichy returns the theater to greatness." —The New York Times
A collection of some of the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright's most definitive works includes All My Sons, Death of a Salesman, The Crucible, A View from the Bridge, and five additional plays. 12,000 first printing.
This Student Edition of After the Fall is perfect for students of literature and drama and offers an unrivalled and comprehensive guide to Miller's play. It features an extensive introduction by Katherine Egerton which includes a chronology of Miller's life and times, a summary of the plot and commentary on the characters, themes, language, context and production history of the play. Together with over twenty questions for further study and detailed notes on words and phrases from the text, this is the definitive edition of the play. Set in a New England state mental hospital in the early 1990s when Prozac was routinely adminstered to treat depression, The Last Yankee sees Miller exploring aspects of the American Dream through the lives of four characters who question and grapple with definitions of success, health and fulfillment. Described by Miller as 'a comedy about a tragedy' the one act play highlights conflicts between men and women, between the working class and the capitalist businessman and between interior and exterior realities.
A comprehensive reader's companion to the works of one of America's greatest playwrights.
Written in 1945, "Focus" was Arthur Miller's first novel and one of the first books to directly confront American anti-Semitism. It remains as chilling and incisive today as it was at the time of its controversial debut. As World War II draws to a close, anti-Semitism is alive and well in Brooklyn, New York. Here, Newman, an American of English descent, floats through a world of multiethnic neighborhoods indifferent to the racism around him. That is, until he begins wearing glasses that render him "Jewish" in the eyes of others, making him the target of anti-Semitic persecution. As he and his wife find friendship and support from a Jewish immigrant, Newman slowly begins to understand the racial hatreds that surround him. "A strong, sincere book bursting with indignation." ("The New York Times Book Review")
Rebelling against her unconventional upbringing by marrying her straitlaced college sweetheart, Dee Aldrich fears her husband wants her dead years later and emulates the tactics of her spy mother for answers. By the author of Three Graves Full.
Arthur Miller's penultimate play, Resurrection Blues, is a darkly comic satirical allegory that poses the question: What would happen if Christ were to appear in the world today? In an unidentified Latin American country, General Felix Barriaux has captured an elusive revolutionary leader. The rebel, known by various names, is rumoured to have performed miracles throughout the countryside. The General plans to crucify the mysterious man, and the exclusive television rights to the twenty-four-hour reality-TV event have been sold to an American network. An allegory that asserts the interconnectedness of our actions and each person's culpability in world events, Resurrection Blues is a comedic and tragic satire of precarious morals in our media-saturated age.
Stages of Engagement is a compelling and wonderfully varied account of the relationship between theatre in the United States and the social, cultural, and political forces that shaped it during one of the most formative periods in the nation’s history. Joshua E. Polster applies key thematic perspectives – Colonialism, Religion, Race and Ethnicity, Gender and Sexuality, Economic Systems, and Systems of Government – to seminal moments in US history. In doing so he explores the ways in which the theatre has responded to these turning points, through the work of some of its principal dramatists, directors, designers, and theatre companies. His approach tackles questions such as: • How did the plays of this period reflect the nation’s concerns and anxieties? • How did theatre, culture, and politics interconnect as the United States took to the world stage? • Which critical viewpoints are most useful to us when examining these cultural phenomena? • How did performances and productions attempt to influence their audiences' social and civic engagement? On its own, or in tandem with its companion volume The Routledge Anthology of US Drama 1898–1949, this is the ideal text for any course in US Theatre. By examining each cultural moment from a range of critical perspectives and drawing upon a diverse range of sources, it is designed specifically for today’s interdisciplinary and multicultural curriculum.
This volume---the second on The Library of America's definitive edition of the works of Arthur Miller---offers an unprecedented look at the extraordinary middle phase of an essential American dramatist. Here are fourteen plays, from Broadway hits to previously unpublished rarities, that trace Miller's evolving genius as he experimented with new forms and themes. Included are After the Fall, a tour de force exploration of guilt, responsibility, and history that shocked the public with its apparent depiction of Miller's life with Marilyn Monroe; Incident at Vichy, a devastating one-act dramatizing the roundup of Jews in Vichy, France; The Price, an intimate drama about two brothers and their inheritance, Miller's biggest commercial success since Death of aSalesman; The Archbishop's Ceiling, a tense and intricately plotted exploration of creativity and the Cold War; Playing for Time, a groundbreaking teleplay based on the story of the Women's Orchestra of Auschwitz; and many more.
This comprehensive volume brings together essays by one of the most influential literary, cultural and intellectual voices of our time: Arthur Miller. Arranged chronologically from 1944 to 2000, these writings take the reader on a whirlwind tour of modern history alongside offering a remarkable record of Miller's views on theater. They give eloquent expression to his belief in 'the theater as a serious business, one that makes or should make man more human, which is to say, less alone'. Published with the essays are articles that Miller had written and in-depth interviews he has given.This collection features material from two earlier publications: Echoes Down the Corridor and The Theater Essays of Arthur Miller. It is edited and features a new introduction by Matthew Roudan�, Regents Professor of American Drama at Georgia State University. 'Arthur Miller understands that serious writing is a social act as well as an aesthetic one, that political involvement comes with the territory. A writer's work and his actions should be of the same cloth, after all. His plays and his conscience are a cold burning force.' Edward Albee

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