Chris Stewart turns another leaf on his life in southern Spain in this evocative and very funny sequel to Driving Over Lemons.
Chris, eternal optimist and itinerant sheep shearer, moves with his wife Ana to a mountain farm in Las Alpujarras, an oddball region in the south of Spain. Misadventures gleefully unfold as Chris discovers that the owner has no intention of leaving and meets their neighbours, an engaging mix of peasant farmers and shepherds, New Age travellers and ex-pats. Their daughter Chloë is born, linking them irrevocably to their new life. The hero of the piece, however, is the farm itself - a patch of mountain studded with olive, almond and lemon groves, sited on the wrong side of a river, with no access road, water supply or electricity.Could life offer much better than that?
Describes the author's unlikely job as a Cornish Crabber, work that required him to learn how to sail during a voyage around the Greek Islands.
The Good Life goes on at El Valero. Find yourself laughing out loud as Chris is instructed by his daughter on local teenage mores; bluffs his way in art history to millionaire Bostonians; is rescued off a snowy peak by the Guardia Civil; and joins an Almond Blossom Appreciation Society.You'll cringe with Chris as he tries his hand at office work in an immigrants' advice centre in Granada, spurred into action by the arrival of four destitute young Moroccans at El Valero. And you'll never see olive oil in quite the same way again...In this sequel to 'Lemons' and 'Parrot', Chris Stewart's optimism and zest for life is as infectious as ever.
Part Four of the million-selling Driving Over Lemons series.
Jason Webster had lived in Spain for 15 years when he and his partner Salud, a flamenco dancer, tired of their city life and decided to buy a crumbling farmhouse clinging to the side of a steep valley in the eastern province of Castellón. He knew nothing about farming - he didn't even know what an almond tree looked like, or that he owned over 100 of them - but with help from local farmers and a twelfth-century book on gardening he set about recreating his dream. Sacred Sierra tells the story of their first year on the mountain, and how they cleared the land, planted and harvested olives, nurtured precious, expensive truffles, all while surviving gale force winds and scorching summer fires. While toying with the timeless, he also retells ancient legends and as the year passed, finds himself increasingly in tune with the ancient, mystical life of the sierra, a place that will haunt your imagination and raise your spirits.
In The Olive Season, Carol Drinkwater’s much-anticipated follow-up to The Olive Farm, Carol and Michel prepare to exchange vows in, of all places, Polynesia—Michel's answer to Carol's challenging response to his marriage proposal (Only if the ceremony is Upon their return to the south of France as husband and wife, they find there is much hope—and work—to greet them. With a farm consisting of fifty trees producing some of the world’s finest olive oil, no longer is the challenge one of restoring the farm but in charting its development and growth. France’s rigorous agricultural standards are responsible for some of the world's best produce but also for one of its most infuriating bureaucracies. In order to obtain the coveted AOC rating, Carol and Michel are forced to both expand their farm and to negotiate a Byzantine world of forms, officials, and inspections, including the surveying of their land by a water diviner, who, via a power akin to extrasensory perception, can point out the existence of underground water sources on their property. Further complicating matters is the fact that Carol has become pregnant with the couple’s first child and has just accepted a demanding acting role. As the harvest season approaches, dramatic events, culminating in a heartbreaking miscarriage, cast shadows over the olive farm. With all the warmth and vibrancy of the Mediterranean sun, Carol Drinkwater tells her passionate, moving, and utterly uplifting story.
A sweeping tale of consequences spanning the 1930s to the 1990s, moving between fascist Italy and modern Ireland In 1933, Bella Stuart leaves her quiet London life to move to Italy to tutor the child of a beautiful Jewish heiress and an elderly Italian aristocrat. Living at the family’s summer home, Bella's reserve softens as she comes to love her young charge, and find friendship with Maestro Edward, his enigmatic music teacher. But as the decade draws to an end and fascism tightens its grip on Europe, the fact that Alec is Jewish places his life in grave danger. Bella and Edward take the boy on a terrifying train journey out of Italy—one they have no reason to believe any of them will survive.
For most people giving up the day job and moving to a beautiful area of France and living off the vines is an impossible but delicious dream. In 1990, Patricia Atkinson and her husband decided to sell up in Britain and emigrate to the Dordogne. Their idea was to buy a house with a few vines attached and employ someone to tend to the wine while they earned their living with some financial consultancy work. There followed a series of disasters: the stock market crashed leaving their small holding as their sole source of income; the first red wine harvest turned to vinegar; and Patricia's husband returned to Britain, unable to cope with the stress. He never returned. Patricia Atkinson, whose only knowledge of wine up to that moment was 'that it came from a bottle' and who had not a word of French, was left to salvage their life savings form the vineyards. What follows is a remarkable story of struggle and transformation whereby her tiny 4 hectare plot has become a major estate of 21 hectares, where her Clos d'Yvigne wines have won awards and been adopted by wine merchants throughout the world and where she has been hailed as a superstar by UK wine writers.
Funny or sad, fact or fiction, heart-warming or heartbreaking. We asked animal lovers everywhere to contribute stories, anecdotes or poems about animals in order to raise funds to help alleviate the desperate plight of abandoned pets in the Alpujarra region of Southern Spain. The response was overwhelming. In addition to a lovely tale from international bestselling author Chris Stewart, (Driving over Lemons), we have stories from many other well known authors including Victoria Twead, David Luddington, Jeff Jones and Elizabeth Revill. Other contributions come from published novelists, broadcasters, writers or everyday animal lovers just sharing their own stories and thoughts. The only thing they all have in common is their passion to help. Southern Spain has been badly hit by the Euro crisis and has one of the highest unemployment rates in Europe resulting in thousands of once-loved domestic pets being abandoned to fend for themselves. Sadly most of these domesticated animals will not survive on their own. In its short history, Valle Verde is a rescue centre which has rescued, treated and re-homed hundreds of lost and bewildered animals however they are desperately short of funds. They receive no government help and rely purely on private donations. This anthology has been sponsored by Mirador Publishing with all profits being donated to help Valle Verde Animal Rescue. All of the authors have generously donated their work and the cover was designed by local artist Charlotte Moore, famous for the covers gracing many best sellers. We are indebted to all those wonderful people who have helped make this anthology a reality. Please read and enjoy and know that you are helping.
Finally confortable living in two worlds at once, Joy is asked to help her boyfriend's twin sister and accept a mission to find a forgotten door between worlds, a door that hides a dangerous secret.
Successfully navigate the rich world of travel narratives and identify fiction and nonfiction read-alikes with this detailed and expertly constructed guide.
George Orwell’s 1984 takes on new life with extraordinary relevance and renewed popularity. “Orwell saw, to his credit, that the act of falsifying reality is only secondarily a way of changing perceptions. It is, above all, a way of asserting power.”—The New Yorker In 1984, London is a grim city in the totalitarian state of Oceania where Big Brother is always watching you and the Thought Police can practically read your mind. Winston Smith is a man in grave danger for the simple reason that his memory still functions. Drawn into a forbidden love affair, Winston finds the courage to join a secret revolutionary organization called The Brotherhood, dedicated to the destruction of the Party. Together with his beloved Julia, he hazards his life in a deadly match against the powers that be. Lionel Trilling said of Orwell’s masterpiece, “1984 is a profound, terrifying, and wholly fascinating book. It is a fantasy of the political future, and like any such fantasy, serves its author as a magnifying device for an examination of the present.” Though the year 1984 now exists in the past, Orwell’s novel remains an urgent call for the individual willing to speak truth to power.
A festive companion to At Home with Carolyne Roehm introduces a host of creative ideas and tips for every kind of party or event, from a formal dinner dance to a simple picnic for four, with suggestions for signature themes, table settings, floral arrangements, decorations, festivities, and forty delicious recipes. 40,000 first printing.
The author of Slug Bread and Beheaded Thistles shares her healthful and entertaining approach to organic gardening, offering an array of nontoxic strategies and remedies to eliminate insects and garden predators, improve the soil, design an organic landscape, protect one's garden against disease, and more. Original.
During the course of Annie Hawes' new book, local culinary superstar, Ciccio, gradually takes over as Annie's constant companion. How irresistible is a man who first demonstrates his affection and esteem by inviting her into his vineyard to help himmix up cow manure, which she spends the afternoon slapping onto an old pizza oven to improve its insulation, before driving her at terrifying speed to a Herbie Hancock concert? But even with Ciccio's help, the everyday life of Ligurian folk never seems to lose its surreal edge for Annie. How long does she have to stay at Diano San Pietro before it all becomes normal run-of-the-mill stuff and ceases to amaze her? Will she ever manage to go native?
F. Scott Fitzgerald is best known for his novels such as THE GREAT GATSBY, but during his all-too-brief literary life, he sold some 160 short stories to popular magazines. Here, noted scholar and biographer Matthew Bruccoli assembles in one volume the full scope of the best of Fitzgerald's short fiction. These 43 sparkling masterpieces are offered in a handsome Scribner Classics edition, perfect for the home library.
The #1 New York Times bestselling (mostly true) memoir from the hilarious author of Furiously Happy. “Gaspingly funny and wonderfully inappropriate.”—O, The Oprah Magazine When Jenny Lawson was little, all she ever wanted was to fit in. That dream was cut short by her fantastically unbalanced father and a morbidly eccentric childhood. It did, however, open up an opportunity for Lawson to find the humor in the strange shame-spiral that is her life, and we are all the better for it. In the irreverent Let’s Pretend This Never Happened, Lawson’s long-suffering husband and sweet daughter help her uncover the surprising discovery that the most terribly human moments—the ones we want to pretend never happened—are the very same moments that make us the people we are today. For every intellectual misfit who thought they were the only ones to think the things that Lawson dares to say out loud, this is a poignant and hysterical look at the dark, disturbing, yet wonderful moments of our lives. Readers Guide Inside

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