`As someone who is often engaged in trying to clarify psychoanalytic ideas for others (and for myself) I found this book inspiring and useful in many ways but perhaps most notably in its skilful re-visiting and articulation of what happens in psychoanalysis and why it is helpful' - Journal Child Psychotherapy ` well constructed and easily digested book' - Mental Health Nursing `This well-written and understandable book will be useful to a cross-section of professional as well as the general-public'- Community Care `This is quite simply the best introduction to psychoanalysis ever written. It is uncluttered yet the interested reader will find most of what they need to know about what psychoanalysis is and is not, with ample links connecting to where to find the rest. The book is exceptionally accessible, balanced and entertaining. There is no need to search any longer as to what to recommend to anyone who wants to orient themselves around this complex field'- Peter Fonagy, Freud Memorial Professor of Psychoanalysis, University College, London and Chief Executive, Anna Freud Centre, London A Short Introduction to Psychoanalysis is a down-to-earth guide to arguably the most misunderstood of all the psychological therapies. With reference to contemporary developments in theory and practice, the book explains what psychoanalysis really is, providing the reader with an overview of its: } basic concepts } historical development } main critiques, and } research base. Demonstrating the far reaching influence of psychoanalysis, the authors - all practicing psychoanalysts - describe how its concepts have been applied beyond the consulting room and examine its place within the spectrum of other psychological theories. Whether reading about psychoanalysis as part of an academic course or purely for personal interest, A Short Introduction to Psychoanalysis provides the ideal `way-in' to the subject for new readers. For those who are thinking of becoming a psychoanalyst, the book also provides information on the training process and the structure of the profession.
A Short Introduction to Clinical Psychology gives an accessible overview of the field for psychology students and anyone considering training as a clinical psychologist. Setting out the theoretical and practical dimensions of clinical psychology, the authors examine its origins, knowledge base and applications with different client groups, in different contexts and through different modalities (individuals, groups, couples, families and organizations). They also highlight issues affecting everyday practice - from professional relationships to government policy. Drawing on the first-hand experiences of people who have recently qualified, the book describes the process of training and the transition that takes place from trainee to practitioner. Throughout, the book captures a sense of clinical psychology as a dynamic and changing field which has grown up fast alongside other more established professions involved in mental health care and which is continuing to evolve in response to contemporary needs. As an overview of the field, A Short Introduction to Clinical Psychology is an ideal text for undergraduate and post-graduate students in psychology and as initial reading for clinical psychology courses.
A Short Introduction to Psychiatry is designed to give readers a clear picture of the profession of psychiatry as it is today as well as an understanding of the subject from which to develop further study. The author describes the development of the profession, the route to qualification and the scope of contemporary practice, including the work done by psychiatrists in a range of specialisms - from child psychiatry to addiction services and forensic psychiatry. Drawing on the experience of people who have been through psychiatric treatment, the book also explores what psychiatry is like from the patient's/user's perspective. Many criticisms have been levelled against the profession and the author, Linda Gask, summarizes key debates which have been and continue to be played out between psychiatry's critics and its defenders. A Short Introduction to Psychiatry is for anyone looking into psychiatry for the first time, whether with a view to training or out of more general interest.
Since its inception, psychoanalysis has been hailed as a revolutionary theory of how the mind works, and some of its ideas have inspired art, literature, and film, and become part of everyday conversation. This title offers a wide-ranging survey and offers insights into the therapeutic potential of the psychoanalytic method that Sigmund Freud pioneered. It shows how ideas about the unconscious have been applied, sets out various criticisms of the psychoanalytic procedure, and considers how both practice and theory have evolved since Freud.
Offers beginning students an introduction to theories and techniques, and their applications to counselling services in elementary and secondary schools, colleges and the community.
Clinical psychology makes a significant contribution to mental health care across the world. The essence of the discipline is the creative application of the knowledge base of psychology to the unique, personal experiences of individuals who are facing difficulties or changes in their lives. Rather than addressing such experiences as primarily a medical, political or legal problem, clinical psychologists approach personal distress as an unhappy outcome of certain ways of thinking, behaving and relating, often occurring within difficult social, cultural or economic circumstances. Clinical psychologists work with people to try and help them change what is distressing or concerning them, based on a belief in the value of the individual to determine what happens to them and on the importance of using approaches which have been demonstrated through research to be effective. In this Very Short Introduction Susan Llewellyn and Katie Aafjes-van Doorn provide insights into the world of clinical psychologists and their clients or patients, and cover the range of domains of practice, the difficulties tackled, and the approaches and models used. They consider the challenges and controversies facing the profession today, and also how it varies across the globe. Finally, they discuss the key questions surrounding clinical psychology, such as whether it should compete or collaborate with psychiatry, how far it is yet another instrument of social control, what new technology can offer in the future, and whether clinical psychology can ever really be considered a science. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
Neukrug's comprehensive introductory text gives students an unparalleled look into the practicalities of the counseling profession, providing them with a broad overview of the field including a firm foundation in the skills, theories, and day-to-day realities of the job. Thorough and research based, the book presents the key concepts and material about the counseling profession with great clarity and insight, while keeping readers engaged through the many illustrative case examples and personal narratives. To ensure that students are thoroughly prepared to further their studies and careers, Neukrug has structured around the eight core CACREP curriculum areas, while enhancing his discussion with insightful coverage of salient topics surrounding such important issues as specializations within counseling, finding a counseling job, and future trends in counseling.
Harold Stewart, a distinguished psychoanalyst of more than 30 years' experience, began his medical career as a general practitioner. He was drawn first towards hypnotherapy, then to psychoanalysis, as a more sensitive, productive and far-reaching method of exploring patients' problems. In this book Stewart draws deeply on his own clinical experience to focus on changes in the patient's experience of inner space, and to record the growth of his own understanding of the patient's experience and how this can change. Beginning with a vivid account of the role of collusion in the myth of Jocasta and Oedipus, he goes on to a theoretical discussion of thinking, dreams, inner space and the hypnotic state, in the context of extensive clinical experience. The second part of the book centres on practical clinical issues and problems of technique, tackling in particular the role of transference interpretations, other agents of change, and the problems encountered in benign and malignant types of regression. The wealth of clinical material and the author's informality and openness in presenting his experiences of working with very disturbed patients will be of immense practical value to other practitioners. Psychic Experience and Problems of Technique will help psychoanalysts and psychotherapists to understand the nature of clinical problems which are often encountered but seldom acknowledged.
This book is a brief primer of essential helping skills for students and professionals in the helping professions. The book contains a brief chapter on theory that provides an overview of the language used in therapy as well as the various approaches used by helping professionals. It then covers the core skills, standard interventions, nature of relationships, developing rapport, as well as important issues regarding assessment and formulating a diagnosis.
Madness is something that frightens and fascinates us all. It is a word with which we are universally familiar, and a condition that haunts the human imagination. Through the centuries, in poetry and in prose, in drama and in the visual arts, its depredations are on display for all to see. A whole industry has grown up, devoted to its management and suppression. Madness profoundly disturbs our common sense assumptions; threatens the social order, both symbolically and practically; creates almost unbearable disruptions in the texture of daily living; and turns our experience and our expectations upside down. Lunacy, insanity, psychosis, mental illness - whatever term we prefer, its referents are disturbances of reason, the passions, and human action that frighten, create chaos, and yet sometimes amuse; that mark a gulf between the common sense reality most of us embrace, and the discordant version some humans appear to experience. Social responses to madness, our interpretations of what madness is, and our notions of what is to be done about it have varied remarkably over the centuries. In this Very Short Introduction, Andrew Scull provides a provocative and entertaining examination of the social, cultural, medical, and artistic responses to mental disturbance across more than two millennia, concluding with some observations on the contemporary accounts of mental illness. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
This book questions whether 'autonomy' is a pivotal psychotherapeutic value. Basing his discussion upon the key Kleinian concept of 'projective identification', the author argues that 'integration' should be the aim of psychoanalysis, and - furthermore - that actions can be judged ethical or unethical according to whether they foster or hinder integration.
Many texts attempt to bridge theory and research. They include one or two pages dealing with important theorists--Jung, Adler, Freud, et al.--inserted into chapters focused on academic studies. In most cases, the discussion fails to do justice to the theorists and the relationship between the ideas and the empirical work is often tenuous at best. This book takes a different approach. An alternative to Ewen's An Introduction to Theories of Personality, this book features a chapter on each major type of theory followed by a separate chapter reviewing the relevant research, controversies, and emerging findings. Although it incorporates material from the previous text, there are substantial differences. Personality: A Topical Approach devotes more attention to psychological research, and considerably less attention to the more minor and abstruse aspects of various theories. Chapters are devoted to the following theories: *pychoanalytically-oriented, *tait, *cgnitive, *self-humanistic, and *behaviorism. While the book emphasizes major research foci (the Big Five personality factors, self-efficacy, self-esteem, and more), it also includes a chapter on research methods and coverage of issues often omitted from other texts such as dream interpretation, cognitions and the Holocaust, scientific inquiry, and near-death experiences. The book also provides study questions, a "help" section, and a glossary.
The work of every school of psychotherapy and every therapist is inevitably structured by a value system and requires codes of ethics and practice. This book addresses the conscious and unconscious aspects of the value system in which therapists are situated. Values and Ethics in the Practice of Psychotherapy and Counselling explores the central issues through the experience of the contributors, each of whom is well known in this field. Each chapter will raise questions for the reader which will stimulate individual thinking about practice or can form a basis for discussion and debate for training or graduate groups. The book is firmly rooted in practice. Each chapter deals with a different aspect of the psychotherapist's work beginning with the general underlying principles, continuing through matters of technique and on to contextual issues. Finally the book moves to the outer world, politics and spirituality as ways of connecting inner and outer, social and individual. The arrangement of chapters allows for flexibility and creativity while providing a coherent structure. Values and Ethics in the Practice of Psychotherapy and Counselling is recommended reading for psychotherapists, psychoanalysts and counsellors in training and practice.
The book explores the underlying beliefs and behaviours that may contribute to obesity, including psychological needs, addiction, fear of deprivation, parental influences and sexual fears. The author draws a useful distinction between the need to eat and the need to maintain a large body size, and addresses both LT obesity and ST weight gain.

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