A Short Introduction to Psychoanalysis offers a user-friendly introduction to arguably the most misunderstood of all the psychological therapies. This fully updated and revised Second Edition explains what psychoanalysis really is and provides the reader with an overview of its basic concepts, historical development, critiques and research base. Demonstrating the far reaching influence of psychoanalysis, the authors - all practicing psychoanalysts - describe how its concepts have been applied beyond the consulting room and examine its place within the spectrum of other psychological theories. The text is enlivened by numerous clinical examples.
A Short Introduction to Clinical Psychology gives an accessible overview of the field for psychology students and anyone considering training as a clinical psychologist. Setting out the theoretical and practical dimensions of clinical psychology, the authors examine its origins, knowledge base and applications with different client groups, in different contexts and through different modalities (individuals, groups, couples, families and organizations). They also highlight issues affecting everyday practice - from professional relationships to government policy. Drawing on the first-hand experiences of people who have recently qualified, the book describes the process of training and the transition that takes place from trainee to practitioner. Throughout, the book captures a sense of clinical psychology as a dynamic and changing field which has grown up fast alongside other more established professions involved in mental health care and which is continuing to evolve in response to contemporary needs. As an overview of the field, A Short Introduction to Clinical Psychology is an ideal text for undergraduate and post-graduate students in psychology and as initial reading for clinical psychology courses.
A Short Introduction to Psychotherapy is an accessible guide to the field for anyone embarking on training or simply interested in finding out more about psychotherapy. Mapping the development and dimensions of contemporary practice, the book explores: " the origins of psychotherapy " its applications in terms of modalities, settings and client populations " central theoretical concepts " the nature of training and career paths for qualified practitioners " main critiques, both from within and outside psychotherapy. A team of well-known and highly-regarded contributors examine issues which have particular bearing on psychotherapy today. This includes the changing roles for psychotherapists working in primary and secondary care and the demand for practice to be more 'evidence-based'. A useful summary is provided of existing research into the efficacy and effectiveness of psychotherapy. Looking ahead, the book also examines the future of psychotherapy and considers the effect that the proposed statutory registration will have on the field. Christine Lister-Ford is a Director of the Northern Guild for Psychotherapy where she leads the MSc in Integrative Psychotherapy. Previously she sat on the Governing Board of the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy for 7 years. She has chaired International and European Training Standards groups over a 15 year period. Her previous publications include Skills in Transactional Analysis Counselling & Psychotherapy (SAGE, 2002). She is a member of the editorial boards of several psychotherapy journals.
A Short Introduction to Psychiatry is designed to give readers a clear picture of the profession of psychiatry as it is today as well as an understanding of the subject from which to develop further study. The author describes the development of the profession, the route to qualification and the scope of contemporary practice, including the work done by psychiatrists in a range of specialisms - from child psychiatry to addiction services and forensic psychiatry. Drawing on the experience of people who have been through psychiatric treatment, the book also explores what psychiatry is like from the patient's/user's perspective. Many criticisms have been levelled against the profession and the author, Linda Gask, summarizes key debates which have been and continue to be played out between psychiatry's critics and its defenders. A Short Introduction to Psychiatry is for anyone looking into psychiatry for the first time, whether with a view to training or out of more general interest.
Since its inception, psychoanalysis has been hailed as a revolutionary theory of how the mind works, and some of its ideas have inspired art, literature, and film, and become part of everyday conversation. This title offers a wide-ranging survey and offers insights into the therapeutic potential of the psychoanalytic method that Sigmund Freud pioneered. It shows how ideas about the unconscious have been applied, sets out various criticisms of the psychoanalytic procedure, and considers how both practice and theory have evolved since Freud.
Clinical psychology makes a significant contribution to mental health care across the world. The essence of the discipline is the creative application of the knowledge base of psychology to the unique, personal experiences of individuals who are facing difficulties or changes in their lives. Rather than addressing such experiences as primarily a medical, political or legal problem, clinical psychologists approach personal distress as an unhappy outcome of certain ways of thinking, behaving and relating, often occurring within difficult social, cultural or economic circumstances. Clinical psychologists work with people to try and help them change what is distressing or concerning them, based on a belief in the value of the individual to determine what happens to them and on the importance of using approaches which have been demonstrated through research to be effective. In this Very Short Introduction Susan Llewellyn and Katie Aafjes-van Doorn provide insights into the world of clinical psychologists and their clients or patients, and cover the range of domains of practice, the difficulties tackled, and the approaches and models used. They consider the challenges and controversies facing the profession today, and also how it varies across the globe. Finally, they discuss the key questions surrounding clinical psychology, such as whether it should compete or collaborate with psychiatry, how far it is yet another instrument of social control, what new technology can offer in the future, and whether clinical psychology can ever really be considered a science. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
Was ich hier als »Einführung in die Psychoanalyse« der Öffentlichkeit übergebe, ... ist die getreue Wiedergabe von Vorlesungen, die ich in den zwei Wintersemestern 1915/6 und 1916/7 vor einer aus Ärzten und Laien und aus beiden Geschlechtern gemischten Zuhörerschaft gehalten habe. Alle Eigentümlichkeiten, durch welche diese Arbeit den Lesern des Buches auffallen wird, erklären sich aus den Bedingungen ihrer Entstehung. Es war nicht möglich, in der Darstellung die kühle Ruhe einer wissenschaftlichen Abhandlung zu wahren; vielmehr mußte sich der Redner zur Aufgabe machen, die Aufmerksamkeit der Zuhörer während eines fast zweistündigen Vortrags nicht erlahmen zu lassen. Die Rücksicht auf die momentane Wirkung machte es unvermeidlich, daß derselbe Gegenstand eine wiederholte Behandlung fand, z. B. das eine Mal im Zusammenhang der Traumdeutung und dann später in dem der Neurosenprobleme. Die Anordnung des Stoffes brachte es auch mit sich, daß manche wichtige Themen, wie z. B. das des Unbewußten, nicht an einer einzigen Stelle erschöpfend gewürdigt werden konnten, sondern zu wiederholten Malen aufgenommen und wieder fallen gelassen wurden, bis sich eine neue Gelegenheit ergab, etwas zu ihrer Kenntnis hinzuzufügen. [Sigmund Freud im »Vorwort«] Inhalt: Vorwort | Erster Teil: Die Fehlleistungen | 1. Einleitung | 2. Die Fehlleistungen | 3. Die Fehlleistungen (Fortsetzung) | 4. Die Fehlleistungen (Schluß) | Zweiter Teil: Der Traum | 5. Schwierigkeiten und erste Annäherungen | 6. Voraussetzungen und Technik der Deutung | 7. Manifester Trauminhalt und latente Traumgedanken | 8. Kinderträume | 9. Die Traumzensur | 10. Die Symbolik im Traum | 11. Die Traumarbeit | 12. Analysen von Traumbeispielen | 13. Archaische Züge und Infantilismus des Traumes | 14. Die Wunscherfüllung | 15. Unsicherheiten und Kritiken | Dritter Teil: Allgemeine Neurosenlehre 16. Psychoanalyse und Psychiatrie | 17. Der Sinn der Symptome | 18. Die Fixierung an das Trauma. Das Unbewußte | 19. Widerstand und Verdrängung | 20. Das menschliche Sexualleben | 21. Libidoentwicklung und Sexualorganisationen | 22. Gesichtspunkte der Entwicklung und Regression. Ätiologie | 23. Die Wege der Symptombildung | 24. Die gemeine Nervosität | 25. Die Angst | 26. Die Libidotheorie und der Narzißmus | 27. Die Übertragung | 28. Die analytische Therapie
This book is a brief primer of essential helping skills for students and professionals in the helping professions. The book contains a brief chapter on theory that provides an overview of the language used in therapy as well as the various approaches used by helping professionals. It then covers the core skills, standard interventions, nature of relationships, developing rapport, as well as important issues regarding assessment and formulating a diagnosis.
"Andrew Scull examines the social, historical, and culturally variable response to madness over the centuries, providing a provocative and entertaining examination of mental illness over more than two millennia."--P. [2] of cover.
This book questions whether 'autonomy' is a pivotal psychotherapeutic value. Basing his discussion upon the key Kleinian concept of 'projective identification', the author argues that 'integration' should be the aim of psychoanalysis, and - furthermore - that actions can be judged ethical or unethical according to whether they foster or hinder integration.
Psychoanalysis is a science evidently fore-ordained to growth and expansion, and among those who have extended the scope of both theory and practice Melanie Klein holds a unique place.This book is a survey of the developments in psychoanalytical knowledge resulting from her work. Her main discoveries relate to the very early phases of mental life. She recognized that the world of unconscious feeling and impulse (which we call 'phantasy') is the effective source of all human actions and reactions, modified though they are when translated into actual external behaviour or conscious thought. Although Freud first enunciated this truth, which originates in his fundamental discovery of the unconscious mind of man, he left many problems still unsolved. These have been brought nearer to a solution through Melanie Klein's consistent awareness of the significance of unconscious phantasy. Not only students of psychoanalysis and workers in related medical fields but also practising child-psychologists and the informed lay public will find this book of absorbing interest.
In this book, eight distinguished and representative critics of psychotherapy outline their views; and eight psychotherapists offer responses to which the critics then provide rebuttals. The dialogue between these critics and psychotherapists is intended to make clear some of the inevitable areas of misunderstanding and to offer a way forward from any entrenched pro-psychotherapy versus anti-psychotherapy statement into a more ecumenical debate.
`Kathy Leach provides a thoughtful, well-written text that addresses the `great weight debate' in an engaging and compassionate way.' -The Psychologist, Vol. 20, March 2007 `The main body of the book focuses on clinical work, offering insightful ways of thinking about and working with obese individuals. The text is punctuated with some very useful case examples and transcripts which guide and enlighten the readers thinking.' -The Psychologist, Vol.20, March 2007 `An excellent, clear and accessible introduction to basic transactional analysis theory and principles, providing useful examples of how this form of therapy can be particularly useful and effective when working with people who overeat.' -The Psychologist, Vol.20, March 2007 `An important contribution in helping clinicians and clients understand the psychological aspects that prevent people form losing weight or maintaining weight loss. It is a `must-have' text for anybody working with this client group.' -The Psychologist, Vol.20, March 2007 `The Overweight Patient provides a practical framework to psychological management of obesity. Kathy Leach employs a model of Transactional Analysis psychotherapy to the treatment of obesity. She clearly writes from her considerable clinical experience. The factual information presented in this interesting book conveys the sense of someone steeped in that patient population. It is well written, with a light touch, and I found myself reading it in a single sitting. To any practitioner of transactional analysis, this will be a `must read.'' -European Eating Disorders Review, 2007 `The Overweight Patient explores the underlying beliefs and behaviours that may contribute to obesity, including psychological needs, addiction, fear of deprivation, parental influences and sexual fears. Kathy Leach draws a useful distinction between the need to eat and the need to maintain a large body size, and addresses the reasons for both long-term obesity and short-term weight gain. She provides a clear and accessible introduction to the psychoanalytic theory of Transactional Analysis and details how this approach can be used with overweight people, and as a self-help methodology. Kathy Leach offers sensitive advice on methods to help clients increase their self - esteem, self- awareness and motivation to develop healthier lifestyles.' -Transactions (TSTA) `Illustrated with patient histories, exercises and worked examples of techniques, this book enables therapists and health practitioners to help obese people to understand why they reach for food or maintain a large body weight, and to change their eating behaviour or live more comfortably with their size.' -Transactions (TSTA) This practical guide approaches obesity and overeating from a psychological perspective, and offers sensitive methods to increase patients' sense of self-worth, self-knowledge, and motivation to lose weight. The Overweight Patient explores the underlying beliefs and behaviours that may contribute to obesity, including psychological needs, addiction, fear of deprivation, parental influences and sexual fears. Kathy Leach draws a useful distinction between the need to eat and the need to maintain a large body size, and addresses the reasons for both long-term obesity and short-term weight gain. She provides a clear and accessible introduction to the psychoanalytic theory of Transactional Analysis and details how this approach can be used with overweight people. Illustrated with patient histories, exercises and worked examples of techniques, this book enables therapists and health practitioners to help obese people come to terms with their size, or to support their decision to change their behaviour and reduce their need to eat.
Harold Stewart, a distinguished psychoanalyst of more than 30 years' experience, began his medical career as a general practitioner. He was drawn first towards hypnotherapy, then to psychoanalysis, as a more sensitive, productive and far-reaching method of exploring patients' problems. In this book Stewart draws deeply on his own clinical experience to focus on changes in the patient's experience of inner space, and to record the growth of his own understanding of the patient's experience and how this can change. Beginning with a vivid account of the role of collusion in the myth of Jocasta and Oedipus, he goes on to a theoretical discussion of thinking, dreams, inner space and the hypnotic state, in the context of extensive clinical experience. The second part of the book centres on practical clinical issues and problems of technique, tackling in particular the role of transference interpretations, other agents of change, and the problems encountered in benign and malignant types of regression. The wealth of clinical material and the author's informality and openness in presenting his experiences of working with very disturbed patients will be of immense practical value to other practitioners. Psychic Experience and Problems of Technique will help psychoanalysts and psychotherapists to understand the nature of clinical problems which are often encountered but seldom acknowledged.

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