This memoir “reveals the depth of [the author’s] love for golf, fatherhood, and his ancestral home—the Sandhills of North Carolina” (Curt Sampson). Named Golf Book of the Year by the International Network of Golf, A Son of the Game is the story of how acclaimed golf writer James Dodson, feeling directionless at midlife, leaves his home in Maine to revisit Pinehurst, North Carolina—where his father first taught him the game that would shape his life. Once he arrives, the curative power of the Sandhills region not only helps him find a new career working for the local paper, but also reignites his flagging passion for golf. And, perhaps more significantly, it inspires him to try to pass along to his teenage son the same sense of joy and contentment he has found in the game, and to recall the many colorful and lifelong friends he has met on the links. This wise memoir about finding new meaning through an old sport is filled with anecdotes about the history of the game and of Pinehurst, the home of American golf, where many larger-than-life legends played some of their greatest rounds. Dodson’s bestselling memoir Final Rounds began in Pinehurst, and now he follows his journey of discovery back to where his love of the game began—a love that he hopes to make a family legacy.
Contains a number of lesser-known South Pacific tales. A SON OF THE SUN (excerpt) The Willi-Waw lay in the passage between the shore-reef and the outer-reef. From the latter came the low murmur of a lazy surf, but the sheltered stretch of water, not more than a hundred yards across to the white beach of pounded coral sand, was of glass-like smoothness. Narrow as was the passage, and anchored as she was in the shoalest place that gave room to swing, the Willi-Waw's chain rode up-and-down a clean hundred feet. Its course could be traced over the bottom of living coral. Like some monstrous snake, the rusty chain's slack wandered over the ocean floor, crossing and recrossing itself several times and fetching up finally at the idle anchor. Big rock-cod, dun and mottled, played warily in and out of the coral. Other fish, grotesque of form and colour, were brazenly indifferent, even when a big fish-shark drifted sluggishly along and sent the rock-cod scuttling for their favourite crevices. On deck, for'ard, a dozen blacks pottered clumsily at scraping the teak rail. They were as inexpert at their work as so many monkeys. In fact they looked very much like monkeys of some enlarged and prehistoric type. Their eyes had in them the querulous plaintiveness of the monkey, their faces were even less symmetrical than the monkey's, and, hairless of body, they were far more ungarmented than any monkey, for clothes they had none. Decorated they were as no monkey ever was. In holes in their ears they carried short clay pipes, rings of turtle shell, huge plugs of wood, rusty wire nails, and empty rifle cartridges. The calibre of a Winchester rifle was the smallest hole an ear bore; some of the largest holes were inches in diameter, and any single ear averaged from three to half a dozen holes. Spikes and bodkins of polished bone or petrified shell were thrust through their noses... About Jack London: Jack London (1876-1916), was an American author and a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction. He was one of the first Americans to make a lucrative career exclusively from writing. London was self-educated. He taught himself in the public library, mainly just by reading books. In 1898, he began struggling seriously to break into print, a struggle memorably described in his novel, Martin Eden (1909). Jack London was fortunate in the timing of his writing career. He started just as new printing technologies enabled lower-cost production of magazines. This resulted in a boom in popular magazines aimed at a wide public, and a strong market for short fiction. In 1900, he made $2,500 in writing, the equivalent of about $75,000 today. His career was well under way. Among his famous works are: Children of the Frost (1902), The Call of the Wild (1903), The Sea Wolf (1904), The Game (1905), White Fang (1906), The Road (1907), Before Adam (1907), Adventure (1911), and The Scarlet Plague (1912).
'The doctor was fated to go back to Bombay; he would keep returning again and again - if not forever, at least for as long as there were dwarves in the circus.' Born a Parsi in Bombay, sent to university and medical school in Vienna, Dr Farrokh Daruwalla is a Canadian citizen - a 59-year-old orthopaedic surgeon, living in Toronto. Once, twenty years ago, Dr Daruwalla was the examining physician of two murder victims in Goa. Now, two decades later, the doctor will be reacquainted with the murderer...
Full of the gentle humour and storytelling that he brings to “Music and Company” every morning, The Gift of the Game is Tom Allen’s exploration of the ways in which hockey can shape the relationship between fathers and sons. In the winter of 2001 Tom Allen stepped onto a frozen lake with his eight-year-old son. They laced up their skates, set out chunks of firewood as goal posts, and played one-on-one hockey under an enormous blue sky. This would mark a new turn in Allen’s relationship with Wesley, even as other relationships began to fall apart. When Allen and his wife go their separate ways, it is hockey that forms the enduring bond between father and son. As Wesley grows in confidence and purpose, Allen grows into the mythic role of hockey dad and assistant coach, and spends his empty afternoons working on his own game on outdoor rinks, if only to avoid the silence of his apartment. But what is this game to which he has entrusted his fragile sense of well-being and his son’s emerging sense of self? With keen intelligence and self-deprecating emotional honesty, Allen sets about answering the questions that shape his new life: How does hockey mould us? To what degree are we defined by our love of the game and our wish to be admired for our skill on the ice? What are the implications for our culture of a game that so privileges violence? In making of hockey the arena of his pride and love and self-respect, Allen is forced to figure out what the game itself means.
Rick Johnson shows dads how to guide their sons into healthy, authentic manhood that honors God and respects others.
VictorianStudies on theWebCritics Choice!Rudyard Kipling: Hell and Heroism is an exploration of two fundamental yet greatly neglected aspects of the author's life and writings: his deep-seated pessimism and his complex creed of heroism. The method of the book is both biographical and critical. Biographically, it traces the roots of Kipling's dark worldview and his search for something to believe in, a way of thinking and acting in defiance of life's hellishness. There matters were more basic to him than any of his social or political opinions, but this the first full-length study devoted to them. Critically, the book takes a fresh and close look at some of Kipling's most important works. The result challenges long established assumptions and amounts to a major reconsideration of novels like Kim and stories like "Mary Postgate" and "The Gardener." Central in these discussions of individual writings is Kipling's concern with the heroic life, but of equal importance is the analysis and evaluation of them as works of art. Avoiding the tangled and special language of some recent literary theory, this will appeal to a wide audience of those interested in Kipling's mind and art.
An in-depth biography of the iconic American revolutionary that “helps us understand the significance of Henry’s enduring image” (The New York Times Book Review). Patrick Henry was a charismatic orator whose devotion to the pursuit of liberty fueled the fire of the American Revolution and laid the groundwork for the United States. As a lawyer and a member of the Virginia House of Burgess, Henry championed the inalienable rights with which all men are born. His philosophy inspired the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and, most significantly, the Bill of Rights. Famous for the line “Give me liberty or give me death!” Patrick Henry was a man who stirred souls and whose dedication to individual liberty became the voice for thousands. In A Son of Thunder, Henry Mayer offers “a biography as [Patrick] Henry himself would have wanted it written—a readable style, informal, engaging, and entertaining” (Southern Historian). “This is history and biography at its best.” —Charleston Evening Post “A fine job of placing Henry’s idea of republican rectitude in context without ignoring the many ironies of his life as a mediator between the yeomanry and the elite.” —The New York Times Book Review “A narrative that eases the reader with seemingly effortless grace into the rough-and-tumble world of eighteenth-century Virginia. Patrick Henry, patriot, emerges . . . a lion of a man, proud, earnest, melancholy, eloquent. The biographer has done his job; one sets this book down having heard the lion’s roar and having felt the sorrow that he is no more.” —San Francisco Examiner
This is a journey into one, who is a gifted son of light. He was born unto life and became man. Saint John and Ian take us on their journey into the pits of Hell. After befriending and earning the love of the Devil, the hierarchy's of Hell delve upon them while Ian deals in and out of the methamphetamine trade. Earning the respect of all the Princes and Dukes of Hell, after beating their King Satan at his own game, Ian becomes the Saint of the Streets. After seeing himself in a trance, Ian earned a new name as Saint John the Immaculate, and takes on a new role, as a possible clandestine agent for the CIA. After filling out an application for a field analyst's position in Albuquerque, New Mexico, he receives a callback, in the spirit. From then on, it's a fight to the End, as all of Hells Army comes against them and America. Ian later finds their defense network and internet forum which may have been dubbed, Operation Myspace. When Ian finds a small weapon of mass destruction in the flesh, he begins to lose his mind as to what he saw and what he experienced. Was it all a possible apocalypse? Or was it a reindeer game that intelligence officials play with one another? There is a lot more to the story at hand, and will come to light in future works. What Ian experienced was very real to him, as he heard and seen it both in the spirit and in the flesh. After growing up on the mean streets of Albuquerque and Southern California, Ian was chosen not only by One, but by many others. From gangsters and syndicates, to devils and Christians. Even the Intelligence community sought after him. For everyone observed what happened in the spirit and now this story must be told. This is the story of Ian and the Triune of Saint John the Immaculate.
For a dozen years, up to the dawn of a new millennium, Paul Helmke led Fort Wayne as mayor of Indiana's second-largest city. It was a time the community grappled with a flood of drugs, escalating crime, an eroding tax base, a flight to the suburbs and downtown decay. And it was a time when the politician's controversial alliances with such people like Bill Clinton, and his unpopular political decisions, like annexing suburbanites fleeing Fort Wayne, made him somewhat of a pariah within his own Republican party. Get a behind-the-scenes look, in Helmke's own words, at the players and events that helped shape Fort Wayne, and how his version of good government positioned the community for years to come.
A sequel to The Soldier's Return focuses on World War II soldier Sam Richardson's eight-year-old son, Joe, who in the years before adolescence struggles with the changes that the war has brought to his family. Reprint.
A chronicle of the first World Series captures all the exitement and drama of this first match-up between the Boston Americans and the Pittsburgh Pirates.
David Pond, author of the bestselling Chakras for Beginners, offers unique and easy-to-follow guidance for experiencing true happiness in your life. In this book on wellness, Pond describes all seven dimensions from which we experience life--our physical identity, emotions, willpower, heart center, thought patterns and intuition, imagination, and spirituality--and gives practical methods for developing and integrating each of these aspects. When you are fully engaged at each level of your being, you gain a multidimensional awareness that serves as a powerful source of strength and hope. Compatible with any spiritual path, this holistic perspective helps you create a richer and more fulfilling life, from overcoming everyday challenges to finding your life's work to becoming a better partner and friend.
Their son, mostly for fun, writes this collection of vignettes about two prominent scientists. The forward includes a description of the two, summarizing their character and their careers. The summary contains an explanation of the title, Entropy Squared. The forward ends with remarks about the accuracy of the vignettes. Some vignettes include a representation of the impact on the son and some have historical significance. The first two sections concern Göttingen, Germany, from where “that American,” Joe, as a fellow student put it, acquired his wife. The first section of Göttingen vignettes is from the time of meeting and from visits until World War II. The second is from after the War. Maria’s career at Sarah Lawrence College separates sections of their supporting the World War II war effort, Joe at the Ballistics Research Laboratory of Aberdeen Proving Grounds and Maria with the Manhattan, nuclear bomb, Project. The Sarah Lawrence College section goes beyond memories because biographers have said little about Maria’s time at Sarah Lawrence. Sections concerning each are followed by a section on Maria receiving of the Nobel Prize. The conclusion is a memorial to Joe.
Dean Billodeaux, son of legendary Sinners quarterback Joe Billodeaux, strives to be his father on the football field but not off of it. Often accused of being "no fun", he possesses a stainless reputation. The only person who believes he isn't perfect is Stacy Polasky, an orphan raised by his parents. Stacy has maintained a bickering relationship with Dean calling him a big lout. He retaliates by dubbing her the Princess. When Dean's sister sees though their antagonism and realizes they are attracted to each other, she suggests Stacy stop being so independent and allow Dean to rescue her a few times. They set up several situations in which he can be Stacy's hero, but one goes badly awry and descends into real danger. Dean learns of Stacy's ploy and feels like a complete fool. Can she regain his love and trust before another woman steps in and takes the prize from the Princess?
NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY PUBLISHERS WEEKLY In the tradition of Tobias Wolff, James Ellroy, and Mary Karr, a stunning memoir of a mother-son relationship that is also the searing, unflinching account of a murder and its aftermath Tombstone, Arizona, September 2001. Debbie St. Germain’s death, apparently at the hands of her fifth husband, is a passing curiosity. “A real-life old West murder mystery,” the local TV announcers intone, while barroom gossips snicker cruelly. But for her twenty-year-old son, Justin St. Germain, the tragedy marks the line that separates his world into before and after. Distancing himself from the legendary town of his childhood, Justin makes another life a world away in San Francisco and achieves all the surface successes that would have filled his mother with pride. Yet years later he’s still sleeping with a loaded rifle under his bed. Ultimately, he is pulled back to the desert landscape of his childhood on a search to make sense of the unfathomable. What made his mother, a onetime army paratrooper, the type of woman who would stand up to any man except the men she was in love with? What led her to move from place to place, man to man, job to job, until finally she found herself in a desperate and deteriorating situation, living on an isolated patch of desert with an unstable ex-cop? Justin’s journey takes him back to the ghost town of Wyatt Earp, to the trailers he and Debbie shared, to the string of stepfathers who were a constant, sometimes threatening presence in his life, to a harsh world on the margins full of men and women all struggling to define what family means. He decides to confront people from his past and delve into the police records in an attempt to make sense of his mother’s life and death. All the while he tries to be the type of man she would have wanted him to be. Praise for Son of a Gun “[A] spectacular memoir . . . calls to mind two others of the past decade: J. R. Moehringer’s Tender Bar and Nick Flynn’s Another Bull____ Night in Suck City. All three are about boys becoming men in a broken world. . . . [What] might have been . . . in the hands of a lesser writer, the book’s main point . . . [is] amplified from a tale of personal loss and grief into a parable for our time and our nation. . . . If the brilliance of Son of a Gun lies in its restraint, its importance lies in the generosity of the author’s insights.”—Alexandra Fuller, The New York Times Book Review “[A] gritty, enthralling new memoir . . . St. Germain has created a work of austere, luminous beauty. . . . In his understated, eloquent way, St. Germain makes you feel the heat, taste the dust, see those shimmering streets. By the end of the book, you know his mother, even though you never met her. And like the author, you will mourn her forever.”—NPR “If St. Germain had stopped at examining his mother’s psycho-social risk factors and how her murder affected him, this would still be a fine, moving memoir. But it’s his further probing—into the culture of guns, violence, and manhood that informed their lives in his hometown, Tombstone, Ariz.—that transforms the book, elevating the stakes from personal pain to larger, important questions of what ails our society.”—The Boston Globe “A visceral, compelling portrait of [St. Germain’s] mother and the violent culture that claimed her.”—Entertainment Weekly From the Hardcover edition.
WINNER OF THE AUREALIS AWARD FOR BEST FANTASY NOVEL The second book in the epic and compulsively readable Sevenwaters series Son of the Shadows follows the trials of the next generation at Sevenwaters and continues the struggles between the Irish and British that began in Daughter of the Forest. After years of happiness, darkness has fallen upon Sevenwaters. Trouble is brewing and leaders are being called into strategic alliances to defend their land. There are some who blame the Britons of Northwoods, for as long as the Islands, home of mystic caves and sacred trees are lost, there can be no peace, and there are some who believe the enemy are much closer to home. Liadhan, with her gift of Sight and healing hands, seems to hold the key. For she exists outside the pattern and she alone seems to have the power to change it. How close are love and hate - and yet how unalike. PRAISE FOR SON OF THE SHADOWS "A wonderful, riveting story" Barbara Erskine "Beautifully written... a sparkling saga of a family whose destiny is to help free Erin from British tyranny." Publishers Weekly Fans of Marion Zimmer Bradley, Isobelle Carmody and Robin Hobb will love Juliet Marillier.

Best Books