Eddie Carbone is a longshoreman and a straightforward man, with a strong sense of decency and of honour. For Eddie, it's a privilege to take in his wife's cousins, straight off the boat from Italy. But, as his niece begins to fall for one of them, it's clear that it's not just, as Eddie claims, that he's too strange, too sissy, too careless for her, but that something bigger, deeper is wrong, and wrong inside Eddie, in a way he can't face. Something which threatens the happiness of their whole family.
Containing in full Miller's masterpieces "The Crucible" and "Death of a Salesman, " this collection comprises 60 years of writing from America's greatest living playwright.
The University of Cambridge Anthologies of Poetry and Stories. Stories of Ourselves is a set text for the Cambridge Literature in English courses at IGCSE, O Level, AS and A Level. The anthology contains stories by writers from many different countries and cultures.
The autobiography of the playwright covering his childhood, successes and failures in the theatre, and the sources and evolution of his plays and their productions, as well as his personal life.
THE STORY: Writing of A MEMORY OF TWO MONDAYS, Chapman called it: a one-act fragment about people who work in an automobile parts warehouse in the early Roosevelt days. Properly speaking, it has no plot--yet something does happen to almost everybod
"Essential reading for any Star Trek and movie fan." -trekmovie.com When Nicholas Meyer was asked to direct the troubled second Star Trek film, he was something less than a true believer. A bestselling author and successful director, he had never been a fan of the TV series. But as he began to ponder the appeal of Kirk, Spock, et al., he realized that their story was a classical nautical adventure yarn transplanted into space and-armed with that insight-set out on his mission: to revitalize Trek.
The bestselling title, developed by International experts - now updated to offer comprehensive coverage of the core and extended topics in the latest syllabus. - Includes a student's CD-ROM featuring interactive tests and practice for all examination papers - Covers the core and supplement sections of the updated syllabus - Supported by the most comprehensive range of additional material, including Teacher Resources, Laboratory Books, Practice Books and Revision Guides - Written by renowned, expert authors with vast experience of teaching and examining international qualifications We are working with Cambridge International Examinations to gain endorsement.
The companion novel to Mrs Bridge, this is a pitch-perfect portrayal of marriage and family life and a poignant dissection of the unexamined life. Walter Bridge, husband to India and father to three, is a successful lawyer in a Kansas suburb. The daily dramas of his life only serve to illuminate his narrow prejudices and complacent outlook, yet he is also troubled by existential doubts, dark undercurrents of desire and a yearning for something forever out of his reach. In Mr Bridge, Evan S. Connell gives us a moving, satirical and poetic portrayal of a man who cannot escape his limitations and of a couple growing old together but unable, ultimately, to connect. The companion novel, Mrs Bridge, telling the story from the other side of the marriage, is published in Penguin Modern Classics. 'With a delicate and subtle irony, Mr Connell shows us, first from her, then from his point of view, the little daily dramas of this ordinary family. It is very, very funny, often moving and sad, and written with an uncompromising realism that one rarely comes across. To me the Bridges were a revelation: I cannot recommend them too highly' Daily Telegraph
Evan S. Connell's Mrs Bridge is an extraordinary tragicomic portrayal of suburban life and one of the classic American novels of the twentieth century. Mrs Bridge, an unremarkable and conservative housewife in Kansas City, has three children and a kindly lawyer husband. She spends her time shopping, going to bridge parties and bringing up her children to be pleasant, clean and have nice manners. And yet she finds modern life increasingly baffling, her children aren't growing up into the people she expected, and sometimes she has the vague disquieting sensation that all is not well in her life. In a series of comic, telling vignettes, Evan S. Connell illuminates the narrow morality, confusion, futility and even terror at the heart of a life of plenty. The companion novel Mr Bridge, telling the story from the other side of the marriage, is also available in Penguin Modern Classics. 'A perfect novel ... Its tone - knowing, droll, plaintive, shuttling rapidly between pain and hilarity - elevates it to its own kind of specialness ... One of those books that can suffuse a room with happiness when someone brings it up' Meg Wulitzer, The New York Times 'Intimate ... affecting ... a very funny book' Joshua Ferris
Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860–1904) overturned the dramatic conventions of his day and laid the groundwork for contemporary approaches to directing and acting. Now, for the first time, the full lyricism, humor, and pathos of his greatest plays are available to an English-speaking audience. Marina Brodskaya's new translations of Ivanov, The Seagull, Uncle Vanya, Three Sisters, and The Cherry Orchard not only surpass in accuracy all previous translations, but also provide the first complete English text of the plays, restoring passages entirely omitted by her predecessors. This much-needed volume renders Chekhov in language that will move readers and theater audiences alike, making accessible his wordplay, unstated implications, and innovations. His characters' vulnerabilities, needs, and neuroses—their humanity—emerge through their genuine, self-absorbed conversations. The plays come to life as never before and will surprise readers with their vivacity, originality, and relevance.
Before The Exorcistand Rosemary's Baby, there was The Case Against SatanBy the twentieth century, the exorcism had all but vanished, wiped out by modern science and psychology. But Ray Russell resurrected the ritual with his classic 1962 horror novel, giving new rise to the exorcism on page, on screen, and even in real life. Teenager Susan Garth was 'a clean-talking sweet little girl' before she started acting strangely - a sudden aversion to churches and a newfound fondness for vulgarity. Then one night, she strips in front of the parish priest and sinks her nails into his throat. If not madness, the answer must be demonic possession. To vanquish the Devil, Bishop Crimmings recruits a younger priest with a taste for modern ideas and brandy. As the two men fight the darkness tormenting Susan, their struggle turns them against each other, and all the while a soul-chilling revelation lurks in the shadows - one which knows that the darkest evil goes by many names. 'Russell links postpulp literature and the Grand Guignol tradition with the modern sensibilities of America in the 1960s . . . He is a fascinating combination of the liberal and the heretic.' Guillermo del Toro
When David Beeves achieves enormous personal and professional success, he finds that his good fortune merely emphasizes the tragedies of those less fortunate, and he struggles to find reason and fulfillment in life.
To celebrate the centennial of his birth, the collected plays of America’s greatest twentieth-century dramatist in a beautiful bespoke hardcover edition In the history of postwar American art and politics, Arthur Miller casts a long shadow as a playwright of stunning range and power whose works held up a mirror to America and its shifting values. The Penguin Arthur Miller celebrates Miller’s creative and intellectual legacy by bringing together the breadth of his plays, which span the decades from the 1930s to the new millennium. From his quiet debut, The Man Who Had All the Luck, and All My Sons, the follow-up that established him as a major talent, to career hallmarks like The Crucible and Death of a Salesman, and later works like Mr. Peters’ Connections and Resurrection Blues, the range and courage of Miller’s moral and artistic vision are here on full display. This lavish bespoke edition, specially produced to commemorate the Miller centennial, is a must-have for devotees of Miller’s work. The Penguin Arthur Miller will ensure a permanent place on any bookshelf for the full span of Miller’s extraordinary dramatic career. The Penguin Arthur Miller includes: The Man Who Had All the Luck, All My Sons, Death of a Salesman, An Enemy of the People, The Crucible, A View from the Bridge, After the Fall, Incident at Vichy, The Price, The Creation of the World and Other Business, The Archbishop’s Ceiling, The American Clock, Playing for Time, The Ride Down Mt. Morgan, The Last Yankee, Broken Glass, Mr. Peters’ Connections, and Resurrection Blues. From the Hardcover edition.
How to study a play - Author and context - Setting and background - Character tree - Timeline - General summary - Themes - Structures - Characters - Language ans style - Quotations.
DON’T MISS BRIDGE OF CLAY, MARKUS ZUSAK’S FIRST NOVEL SINCE THE BOOK THIEF. The extraordinary #1 New York Times bestseller that is now a major motion picture, Markus Zusak's unforgettable story is about the ability of books to feed the soul. When Death has a story to tell, you listen. It is 1939. Nazi Germany. The country is holding its breath. Death has never been busier, and will become busier still. Liesel Meminger is a foster girl living outside of Munich, who scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist–books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement. In superbly crafted writing that burns with intensity, award-winning author Markus Zusak, author of I Am the Messenger, has given us one of the most enduring stories of our time. “The kind of book that can be life-changing.” —The New York Times “Deserves a place on the same shelf with The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank.” —USA Today
Arthur Miller's extraordinary masterpiece, Death of a Salesman changed the course of modern theatre, and has lost none of its power as an examination of American life and consumerism, published in Penguin Modern Classics. 'A man is not an orange. You can't eat the fruit and throw the peel away' Willy Loman is on his last legs. Failing at his job, dismayed at his the failure of his sons, Biff and Happy, to live up to his expectations, and tortured by his jealousy at the success and happiness of his neighbour Charley and his son Bernard, Willy spirals into a well of regret, reminiscence, and A scathing indictment of the ultimate failure of the American dream, and the empty pursuit of wealth and success, is a harrowing journey. In creating Willy Loman, his destructively insecure anti-hero, Miller defined his aim as being 'to set forth what happens when a man does not have a grip on the forces of life'. Arthur Miller (1915-2005), American dramatist, was born in New York City. In 1938 Miller won awards for his comedy The Grass Still Grows. His major achievement was Death of a Salesman, which won the 1949 Pulitzer Prize for drama and the 1949 New York Drama Critics' Circle Award. The Crucible was aimed at the widespread congressional investigation of subversive activities in the US; the drama won the 1953 Tony Award. Miller's autobiography, Timebends: A Life was published in 1987. If you enjoyed Death of a Salesman, you might like Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire, also available in Penguin Modern Classics.
Luis Alberto Urrea's Across the Wire offers a compelling and unprecedented look at what life is like for those refugees living on the Mexican side of the border—a world that is only some twenty miles from San Diego, but that few have seen. Urrea gives us a compassionate and candid account of his work as a member and "official translator" of a crew of relief workers that provided aid to the many refugees hidden just behind the flashy tourist spots of Tijuana. His account of the struggle of these people to survive amid abject poverty, unsanitary living conditions, and the legal and political chaos that reign in the Mexican borderlands explains without a doubt the reason so many are forced to make the dangerous and illegal journey "across the wire" into the United States. More than just an expose, Across the Wire is a tribute to the tenacity of a people who have learned to survive against the most impossible odds, and returns to these forgotten people their pride and their identity. From the Trade Paperback edition.
In the New Hollywood of the 1970s, just as Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg and Francis Ford Coppola were making their first classic films, a parallel group of directors was inventing the modern horror film. Wes Craven, George A. Romero, Roman Polanski, John Carpenter, Brian De Palma and others made films that were aggressive, raw and utterly original. They would go on to achieve massive box office success. Based on unprecedented access to these leading figures, and hundreds of other interviews, Jason Zinoman's Shock Value delivers an enthralling behind-the-scenes account of horror's golden age. Films such as Rosemary's Baby, Carrie, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and Halloween created the template used by horror films ever since. They exploded taboos and drew on their creators' deepest anxieties to bring horror a gritty, confrontational style and political edge. Shock Value tells the remarkable stories behind the making of these films, which remain misunderstood even by some avid fans. Shot largely outside the Hollywood system on shoestring budgets, they dispensed with traditional vampires and werewolves, assaulting audiences with the dark side of suburbia and a new brand of nihilistic violence. When The Exorcist became the highest-grossing blockbuster of all time, the big studios took notice and the cinema would never be the same again. As the classic horror films of the 1970s conquered both the multiplex and the art house, thy entered the collective imagination and as Jason Zinouman shows, even taught us what to be afraid of. Shock Value is an enormously entertaining account of a highly influential era in filmmaking and Hollywood history.
When Dr. Stockmann discovers that the water in the small Norwegian town in which he is the resident physician has been contaminated, he does what any responsible citizen would do: reports it to the authorities. But Stockmann's good deed has the potential to ruin the town's reputation as a popular spa destination, and instead of being hailed as a hero, Stockmann is labeled an enemy of the people. Arthur Miller's adaptation of Henrik Ibsen's classic drama is a classic in itself, a penetrating exploration of what happens when the truth comes up against the will of the majority. This edition includes Arthur Miller’s preface and an introduction by John Guare. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. From the Trade Paperback edition.

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