A New York Times Best Book of the Year: Short stories centered around a French Canadian family that relocates to Paris in the years before WWII. One of the greatest strengths of Mavis Gallant’s writing is her ability to distill a character’s emotions into a simple moment—a lingering glance or an unuttered word. Her flair for detail is everywhere in evidence in Across the Bridge, studies of Montreal and Paris over the last century. The primary focus of this story collection is the Carettes, a family of French Canadians who relocate to Paris before World War II. The two daughters, Marie and Berthe, could not be more different: Marie is traditional and quiet while Berthe is strong willed and open minded. But as they grow together, the two learn how much they truly have in common. Accompanying these stories of the Carettes are tales of growth and isolation at home and abroad, including one of a rebellious French-speaking Canadian girl growing up in the Anglophone area of the city. Another entry is focused on an anthropologist who, on a trip to a small country, finds a group of people who speak a language no one has ever heard before. Unfortunately, when he announces his discovery, no one believes him. Gallant writes “elegant, witty tales of place and person” and cannily observes small domestic moments as her characters create and destroy the illusions in their lives (Library Journal).
Our understanding of vertebrate origins and the backbone of human history evolves with each new fossil find and DNA map. Many species have now had their genomes sequenced, and molecular techniques allow genetic inspection of even non-model organisms. But as longtime Nature editor Henry Gee argues in Across the Bridge, despite these giant strides and our deepening understanding of how vertebrates fit into the tree of life, the morphological chasm between vertebrates and invertebrates remains vast and enigmatic. As Gee shows, even as scientific advances have falsified a variety of theories linking these groups, the extant relatives of vertebrates are too few for effective genetic analysis. Moreover, the more we learn about the species that do remain—from sea-squirts to starfish—the clearer it becomes that they are too far evolved along their own courses to be of much use in reconstructing what the latest invertebrate ancestors of vertebrates looked like. Fossils present yet further problems of interpretation. Tracing both the fast-changing science that has helped illuminate the intricacies of vertebrate evolution as well as the limits of that science, Across the Bridge helps us to see how far the field has come in crossing the invertebrate-to-vertebrate divide—and how far we still have to go.
From the author of the acclaimed Venetian Stories, a captivating new collection about Venice from the perspective of its residents. A professor writes lectures on Venetian literature for American millionaires. A baroness falls in love with the architect restoring the ancient palazzo of her husband’s family. An ambitious gallery owner sells a young artist’s work faster than he can paint it. A salesman finds a way to trip up a narcissistic race car driver who seems to be able to get away with anything. As her characters negotiate the conflict between tradition and a rapidly changing city, Jane Turner Rylands draws us deep into a society all but unknown to outsiders. From the Trade Paperback edition.
The Bridge Across The River is a wonderful collection of poetry and nursery style rhymes sure to put a smile on the face of every child and adult. Sorry, there are no illustrations within, just the printed words requiring nothing more than the reader's time and a vivid imagination.
Wartime intrigue spans the lives of three women--past and present--in this emotional novel from the acclaimed author of As Bright as Heaven. February, 1946. World War Two is over, but the recovery from the most intimate of its horrors has only just begun for Annaliese Lange, a German ballerina desperate to escape her past, and Simone Deveraux, the wronged daughter of a French Résistance spy. Now the two women are joining hundreds of other European war brides aboard the renowned RMS Queen Mary to cross the Atlantic and be reunited with their American husbands. Their new lives in the United States brightly beckon until their tightly-held secrets are laid bare in their shared stateroom. When the voyage ends at New York Harbor, only one of them will disembark... Present day. Facing a crossroads in her own life, Brette Caslake visits the famously haunted Queen Mary at the request of an old friend. What she finds will set her on a course to solve a seventy-year-old tragedy that will draw her into the heartaches and triumphs of the courageous war brides--and will ultimately lead her to reconsider what she has to sacrifice to achieve her own deepest longings. CONVERSATION GUIDE INCLUDED
When a bridge collapses in the Highlands of Scotland, dozens of people vanish into the river below. A car hired by a woman tourist was filmed pulling onto the bridge moments before it fell. Now numbered among the missing, the woman seized her chance to start her life over.
The man who wakes up in the extraordinary world of a bridge has amnesia, and his doctor doesn't seem to want to cure him. Does it matter? Exploring the bridge occupies most of his days. But at night there are his dreams. Dreams in which desperate men drive sealed carriages across barren mountains to a bizarre rendezvous; an illiterate barbarian storms an enchanted tower under a stream of verbal abuse; and broken men walk forever over bridges without end, taunted by visions of a doomed sexuality. Lying in bed unconscious after an accident wouldn't be much fun, you'd think. Oh yes? It depends who and what you've left behind. Which is the stranger reality, day or night? Frequently hilarious and consistently disturbing, THE BRIDGE is a novel of outrageous contrasts, constructed chaos and elegant absurdities.
In the brave new Japan of the 1870s, Taka and Nobu meet as children and fall in love; but their relationship will test the limits of society. Unified after a bitter civil war, Japan is rapidly turning into a modern country with rickshaws, railways and schools for girls. Commoners can marry their children into any class, and the old hatred between north and south is over - or so it seems. Taka is from the powerful southern Satsuma clan which now dominates the country, and her father, General Kitaoka, is a leader of the new government. Nobu, however, is from the northern Aizu clan, massacred by the Satsuma in the civil war. Defeated and reduced to poverty, his family has sworn revenge on the Satsuma. Taka and Nobu's love is unacceptable to both their families and must be kept secret, but what they cannot foresee is how quickly the tables will turn. Many southern samurai become disillusioned with the new regime, which has deprived them of their swords, status and honour. Taka's father abruptly leaves Tokyo and returns to the southern island of Kyushu, where trouble is brewing. When he and his clansmen rise in rebellion, the government sends its newly-created army to put them down. Nobu and his brothers have joined this army, and his brothers now see their chance of revenge on the Satsuma. But Nobu will have to fight and maybe kill Taka's father and brother, while Taka now has to make a terrible choice - between her family and the man she loves ...
Upon completion of the Brooklyn Bridge, P.T. Barnum and his twenty-one elephants parade across to prove to everyone that the bridge is safe.
Portrays the dramatic lives of the people living in a small town near a huge stone bridge in the Balkans
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This is the continuing story of two men, alike in many ways, who travel far from their native land but are both drawn back to Durham, the spectacular mediaeval city that dominates the northeastern counties of England. But there is a difference. Six hundred years separates the lives of the two men. Oswald, who has seen action in France and England, is loyal to his King, Edward III, who is also called Plantagenet. When Oswald sees that the lives of Edward and his son, John of Lancaster (called John of Gaunt by many modern historians), are in jeopardy, he calls to his descendent, James Simpson, for help. James Simpson is a scientist of world renown who turns his talents to writing historical fiction. After returning to his native Durham, he settles into a quiet village hoping to continue his writing. But when Oswald contacts him, he realizes that they are closer in relationship and behavior that he had believed. Simpson is surprised to find that Oswald is reaching out to him from the past. He is also surprised that Oswald has a mission for him that requires being transported back into the fourteenth century. Simpson cannot resist being personally drawn into the mystery. With the exception of the main fictional characters in the story, the book is a historically accurate account of life in the fourteenth century and the politics that surrounded the throne of England.
The Author was born in Cohasset, Minnesota, on August 28, 1925. Ms. Axt attended grade school in Cohasset and then high school in Grand Rapids, Minnesota. She married Kenneth H. Cress, who was killed in World War II, at Iwo Jima. They had one son. She later married her late husband, William Axt. They were married 38 years and had six children. He died in 1985. Ms. Axt now resides in Walker, Minnesota, with a significant other for the past eleven years. Sewing keeps her busy. She is blessed with numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and great-great-grandchildren. There are five generations here.
In 'The City of Silver Light', Keira Leichman spent the night lost in a wild snowstorm that struck Cassidy Heights. But what really happened that night? Not even Keira can be sure. What she does know is that she's been having strange dreams since the accident, and now she's stuck with a broken ankle and the possibility of never playing soccer again. That is, until she finds Jake's telescope, and is drawn across the Bridge of Ice to Shar. Now Keira is marooned in the City of Silver Light with Daniel, Jake’s younger brother, with no way to get home. But that is the least of their worries, for the secrets they discover in Shar are more dangerous than Kiera could ever have imagined. And the fate of both their worlds are in their hands.
"A tale of grand dreams, shady politics, daring engineering experiments, greed, ambition, and westward expansion, Rails across the Mississippi is the first book-length history since 1881 to document the planning, financing, and construction of the first bridge across the Mississippi River at St. Louis, a national engineering landmark completed in 1874 that is now known as the Eads Bridge. Robert W. Jackson takes a fresh look at this monumental project, dispersing the myths and filling in the gaps left by earlier scholarship."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Evelyn Klein explores the moods and experiences of her family life, her divorce and her progress toward a new sense of self in this series of poems, illustrated with stunning woodcuts done by her father, Wolfgang Klein.
Taiwan's recent moves to democratize its political system have undermined the "one China" policy and demanded the redefinition of relations between Taiwan and China. Across the Taiwan Strait provides a new and timely look at the pivotal role of democracy in the fifty-year-old conflict. Drawn from the proceedings of a conference organized by the Claremont Institute, the work discusses the varying perceptions of democracy in China and Taiwan and the different democracy movements developing on either side of the Taiwan Strait. It highlights the importance of Taiwan in establishing an Asian experience of democracy, the role of the United States in mediating this discussion of democracy, and the need to ensure that democratic development enhances, rather than destabilizes, the cross-strait relationship.

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