This is the continuing story of two men, alike in many ways, who travel far from their native land but are both drawn back to Durham, the spectacular mediaeval city that dominates the northeastern counties of England. But there is a difference. Six hundred years separates the lives of the two men. Oswald, who has seen action in France and England, is loyal to his King, Edward III, who is also called Plantagenet. When Oswald sees that the lives of Edward and his son, John of Lancaster (called John of Gaunt by many modern historians), are in jeopardy, he calls to his descendent, James Simpson, for help. James Simpson is a scientist of world renown who turns his talents to writing historical fiction. After returning to his native Durham, he settles into a quiet village hoping to continue his writing. But when Oswald contacts him, he realizes that they are closer in relationship and behavior that he had believed. Simpson is surprised to find that Oswald is reaching out to him from the past. He is also surprised that Oswald has a mission for him that requires being transported back into the fourteenth century. Simpson cannot resist being personally drawn into the mystery. With the exception of the main fictional characters in the story, the book is a historically accurate account of life in the fourteenth century and the politics that surrounded the throne of England.
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In 'The City of Silver Light', Keira Leichman spent the night lost in a wild snowstorm that struck Cassidy Heights. But what really happened that night? Not even Keira can be sure. What she does know is that she's been having strange dreams since the accident, and now she's stuck with a broken ankle and the possibility of never playing soccer again. That is, until she finds Jake's telescope, and is drawn across the Bridge of Ice to Shar. Now Keira is marooned in the City of Silver Light with Daniel, Jake’s younger brother, with no way to get home. But that is the least of their worries, for the secrets they discover in Shar are more dangerous than Kiera could ever have imagined. And the fate of both their worlds are in their hands.
The Author was born in Cohasset, Minnesota, on August 28, 1925. Ms. Axt attended grade school in Cohasset and then high school in Grand Rapids, Minnesota. She married Kenneth H. Cress, who was killed in World War II, at Iwo Jima. They had one son. She later married her late husband, William Axt. They were married 38 years and had six children. He died in 1985. Ms. Axt now resides in Walker, Minnesota, with a significant other for the past eleven years. Sewing keeps her busy. She is blessed with numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and great-great-grandchildren. There are five generations here.
Ethan and Ella find a mystery atop Machu Picchu in the seventh book of Greetings from Somewhere, an exciting series about mystery, travel, and adventure. The Briar family is off to Peru! They explore small towns within the Sacred Valley, go horseback riding up into ancient salt mines, help weave alpaca wool into blankets, and then travel to Machu Picchu, the “Lost City of the Incas.” While Ethan and Ella are exploring the incredible site, they come across a wooden bridge that leads them to a mysterious stone structure. What is it, why haven’t they heard about it—and why does it seem to look like a snake, a bird, and a puma at the same time? With easy-to-read language and illustrations on almost every page, the Greetings from Somewhere chapter books are perfect for beginning readers.
Across the 59th Street Bridge and Back is the memoir of a girl who grew up in Queens, New York in the 1970's, when children weren't protected by seat belts, but furniture was always protected by plastic slipcovers. Like most kids of her generation, she was routinely left unattended and when she was in the company of adults, she was usually inhaling the secondhand smoke emitted from their cigarettes.
It is 1241 AD, and the Mongols have just invaded Europe, effecting a giant collision of cultures. Hungarian King Béla has already declared a state of emergency, Mongolian troops have killed nearly three hundred thousand people in Moscow, and now everyone fears the troops are headed for Poland. As King Boleslav and his son, Prince Alexander, anxiously await the Mongols' next move, they have no idea that a team of cavalry scouts has already made the decision to assassinate the Great Khan of Mongolia. Now all the scouts must do is capture the one person who can help them execute their plan. Tianyin has been assigned to find a girl with one blue eye and one brown eye, possessing a dagger carved with the Great Khan's name—and he must do so before the army seizes Krakow. Angela Cherreh, however, has grown up in Poland without any clue that she is the Mongolian princess they are seeking. And now she stands at the stake, preparing to be burned alive because everyone believes she is a witch. In this historical tale, an assassin and a princess discover that sometimes things do not turn out as expected, especially in an uncertain and dangerous world.
A fearless investigation of mainstream medicine's most revered dogma, Bridge Across the Abyss is solidly based on trusted medical literature. Find out why advice from authorities on screening tests, blood transfusions, pain and anti-reflux medicines, vitamin supplementation, cholesterol and diet is often wrong. See how clinical trials are slanted. This is a single compendium consisting of a discussion that describes commonly employed clinical practices that are instituted and taught despite the surprising lack of data supporting their use. In essence, these have created a medical dogma that is seldom questioned and accepted as valid regardless of what the evidence has borne out.
A Bridge across the Ocean focuses on the relations between the United States and the Holy See from the First World War to the eve of the Second, through the combination of American, Italian, and Vatican sources. More than an overall picture of the American and Vatican foreign policy during the first half of the twentieth century, the book analyzes the U.S.-Vatican rapprochement in a multifaceted way, considering both the international and the internal sphere. A Bridge across the Ocean discusses the spread of anti-Catholicism in the United States during the first two decades of the twentieth century, and its repercussions on the American administrations' behavior during and after the Versailles Conference, together with the changes that occurred in the Holy See's attitude toward the American church and the White House after the election of Pope Pius XI. Luca Castagna explores the convergence of the New Deal legislation with the church's social thought, and demonstrates how the partial U.S.-Vatican rapprochement in 1939 resulted from Roosevelt and Pacelli's common aim to cooperate, as two of the most important and global moral powers in the struggle against Nazi-fascism.
Recounts the unlikely friendship between Mendel Cohen, a Jewish craftsman, and King Abdullah ibn Hussein of Jordan
The TRADE PAPERBACK version of this Anthology features no less than 132 award-winning poems from the 2nd Margaret Reid Prize and the 3rd Tom Howard Poetry Contest. Poets represented include Osmond Benoliel, Daniel E. Speers, Marie Delgado Travis, Raymond Southall, Jacqueline Cooke, Lynn Sadler, Michael Swan, Ned Condini, Katherine Edgren, Joyce Meyers, Ian A. Hawkins, Shulamit Bat-Or, Graeme King, John Flanagan, Laurie B. Moore, Becky Sakellariou, Sue Chenette, Tara Lee Lavelle, Eileen Favorite, Marie-Suzanne Niedzielska, Mark Stuart Woodcock, Tom Berman, Karin Hoffecker, Harold Fleming, Debbie Camelin, Joseph A. Soldati, and Cheryl Loetscher. Judges John H. Reid and Dee C. Konrad are also represented.
This volume collects sixty-three stories and novellas written by Heinrich Boll between 1947 and 1985. It brings together selections from Boll's earlier collections and some previously unpublished work. The chronological organization represents the entire span of Boll's career, from the stories of the early postwar period, to the masterfully satirical tales of later years.
A new collection of stories by Mavis Gallant is always a major publishing event. For this is the writer who–like Margaret Atwood and Alice Munro–has made Canadian short stories a presence on the world literary scene, and on our bestseller lists. InAcross the Bridgefour of the eleven stories are connected, following the fortunes of the Carette family in Montreal. In “1933” their widowed mother teaches Berthe and Marie to deny that she was a seamstress and to say instead that she was “clever with her hands.” In “The Chosen Husband” the luckless suitor Louis has to undergo the front-parlour scrutiny of Marie’s mother and sister: “But then Louis began to cough and had to cover his mouth. He was in trouble with a caramel. The Carettes looked away, so that he could strangle unobserved. ‘How dark it is,’ said Berthe, to let him think he could not be seen.” We then follow their marriage, the birth of Raymond, and Raymond’s flight from his mother and aunt to his eventual role as a motel manager in Florida. “‘The place was full of Canadians,’ he said. ‘They stole like raccoons...’” With the exception of “The Fenton Child,” an eerie story set in postwar Montreal, the other stories take place in the Paris Mavis Gallant knows so well. “Across the Bridge,” the title story, begins with the narrator’s mother throwing her reluctant daughter’s wedding invitations into the Seine. “I watched the envelopes fall in a slow shower and land on the dark water and float apart. Strangers leaned on the parapet and stared, too, but nobody spoke.” This is a superb collection of stories by a writer at the top of her form. From the Hardcover edition.
Christina Noble's story is one of bravery and resilience in the face of deprivation and abuse on a scale that most would find unimaginable. Her childhood in the Dublin slums barely merits the name: after the early death of her mother, her family was split apart, her alcoholic father unable to care for his children. Christina was sexually abused and later escaped from an orphanage to live in poverty on the streets of Dublin. Whilst in an abusive marriage, in a dream she found the will to fight. Christina's hope lay in a determination to work among the street children of Vietnam, and this was the starting point for the most extraordinary part of her story. Within two years of arriving in Ho Chi Minh City she had opened a medical and social centre and achieved worldwide fame. Outspoken, often angry, yet profoundly moving, Bridge Across my Sorrows is one of the most inspirational stories ever told.
A lavishly illustrated title from acknowledged railway expert Colin G. Maggs, presenting the story of Gloucestershire’s branch lines.
July 9, 1947. Roswell, New Mexico. A young boy tags along with his father to the Roswell Army Air Field and witnesses something he was not to see or know about until fifty-three years later. August 5, 2000. Garden Plains, Kansas. A massive alien craft is spotted hovering by local citizens and darts off to the Northwest somewhere in Colorado, where it starts to tailgate commercial Flight 311 on its way to Oklahoma City. Three F-15 aircrafts are scrambling to intercept and investigate this unknown intruder. The alien craft darts off to the Southeast, and the three F-15s give pursuit of the unknown intruder. The alien craft is able to lose the F-15s in a thunderstorm near Roswell, and history repeats itself some fifty-three years later.
Von Millionen Lesern sehnsüchtig erwartet – der neue große Roman vom preisgekrönten Autor des Weltbestsellers »Die Bücherdiebin«. Dies ist die Geschichte der fünf Dunbar-Brüder. Nach dem Tod der geliebten Mutter und dem Weggang ihres Vaters leben sie nach ihren ganz eigenen Regeln. Sie trauern, sie lieben, sie hassen, sie hoffen und sie suchen. Nach einem Weg, mit ihrer Vergangenheit klarzukommen, nach der Wahrheit und nach Vergebung. Schließlich ist es Clay – angetrieben von den Erinnerungen an ihren tragischen Verlust –, der beschließt, eine Brücke zu bauen. Eine Brücke, die Vergangenheit zu überwinden und so sich selbst und seine Familie zu retten. Dafür verlangt er sich alles ab, was er geben kann, und mehr: nichts weniger als ein Wunder.

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