This book explores the issue of legitimate criminalization in a modern, liberal society. It argues that criminalization should be limited by normative principles, defining the substance of what can be legitimately proscribed. Coverage provides a comparative study between two major criminal legal systems and its theories: the Anglo-American, on one side, and the Continental criminal legal system of Germanic legal circle, on the other.
This book sets out an agenda to transform international criminal trials and the delivery of international criminal justice to victim communities through collaboration of currently competing paradigms. It reflects a transformation of thinking about the comparative analysis of the trial process, and seeks to advance the boundaries of international criminal justice through wider access and inclusivity in an environment of rights protection.Collaborative justice is advanced as providing the future context of international criminal trials. The book's radical dimension is its argument for the harmonization of restorative and retributive justice within the international criminal trial. The focus is initially on the trial process, a key symbol of developing international styles of justice. It examines theoretical models and political applications of criminal justice through detailed empirical analysis, in order to explore the underlying relationship of theory and empirical study, applying the outcome in theory testing and policy evaluation in several different jurisdictions. The book injects a significant comparative dimension into the study of international criminal justice.This is achieved through searching the traditional foundations of internationalism in justice by employing an original methodology to enable a multi-dimensional exploration of contexts (local, regional and global), so recognising the importance of difference within an agenda suggesting synthesis.The book argues for a concept of international trial within a 'rights paradigm', understood against different procedural traditions and practices, and provides a detailed description of trials and trial decision-making in various jurisdictions. Transforming International Criminal Justice also sets out to develop effective research strategies as part of its interrogation of specific trial narratives and meanings in contemporary legal cultures. Key themes are those of internationalisation, fair trial and the exercise of discretion in justice resolutions (sentencing in particular), and the lay/professional relationship and its dynamics. Finally, the book provides a searching critique of the relevance of existing criminology and legal sociology in relation to international criminal justice, and speculates on trial transformation and the merger of retributive and restorative international criminal justice. comparative analysis of the criminal trial process internationallyargues for harmonization of retributive and restorative justice within the international criminal trialsets out an agenda to transform international criminal trials and the delivery of international criminal justice to victim communities
‘New Zealand has one of the highest levels of imprisonment in the Western world. Yet the growth of imprisonment in New Zealand has occurred when the crime rate here, as in most other Western societies, has been in significant decline. Why, then, the disjuncture?’ In this penetrating BWB Text, John Pratt describes the dramatic transformation in penal thought that has recently taken place in this country. Rising imprisonment in New Zealand, against the background of a falling crime rate, is connected with changes in how we, as a society, think about the purpose and function of punishment. This growth of ‘penal populism’, Pratt asserts, has caused enormous and lasting damage to New Zealand’s social fabric.
Expertly drawing on international examples and existing literature, Penal Populism closes a gap in the field of criminology. In this fascinating expose of current crime policy John Pratt examines the role played by penal populism on trends in contemporary penal policy. Penal populism is associated with the public's decline of deference to the criminal justice establishment amidst alarm that crime is out of control. Pratt argues that new media technology is helping to spread national insecurities and politicians are not only encouraging such sentiments but are also being led on by them. Pratt explains it is having most influence in the development of policy on sex offenders, youth crime, persistent criminals and anti-social behaviour. This topical resource also covers new dimensions of the phenomenon, including: the changing nature and structure of the mass media less reliance on the more orthodox expertise of civil servants and academics limitations to the impact of populism, bureaucratic resistance from judges, lawyers and academics and the restorative justice movement. This is essential reading for students, researchers and professionals working in criminology and crime policy.
Release from prison is matter of increasing interest throughout Europe. On the one hand, arguments about the need to reduce prison numbers, as well the consistent findings that prisoners can be integrated into society more effectively if they are subject to a period of supervision in the community, have made early release policies attractive to governments and to academic commentators. On the other hand, there are concerns that early release may not be applied fairly to all prisoners. This book aims to meet the need for comparative information on release from prison across Europe and explores some of the key themes and issues. The body of the book focuses on country perspectives, providing an invaluable survey of the situation in a number of European countries. The introductory and concluding chapters place the comparative material in a broader perspective. They explain how release policy is related to wider questions about justice and fairness in prison-related decision-making and the changing place of imprisonment in European society.
This book focuses on an obscure case of infanticide (18th century) in order to pursue a heated debate on the essence of life and the nature of the soul, where theological, moral and scientific principles come into conflict. On 5 December 1709 in Bologna Lucia Cremonini is accused of a terrible crime: the murder of her newborn son. This tragic episode, exhumed from the depths of time, is placed at the centre of an enthralling study by one of the leading scholars of modern history and the history of religious beliefs. During the course of a dramatic trial the crime is debated by representatives of religious, philosophical, moral, and scientific culture, all characteristic of the formative period of the modern world and all seeking a convincing answer to fundamental questions.
Crime in Africa is fast growing like African cities, African poverty, African indebtedness, African brain-drain and African dependence; everything in Africa appears to be growing very fast; population too has been fast growing except that it is being reduced by violence as we have witnessed in Rwanda, Burundi and Somalia and AIDS pandemic that is first spreading in Africa, claiming thousands of lives every year. This book is a collection of essays and papers not based on empirical research on crime in East Africa but general observations arising out of the author's experience as a criminologist in East Africa.
The Future of Criminology takes stock of the major advances and developments that have taken place in the past several decades and asks where the field of criminology is headed. In thirty-three brief essays, the field's leading scholars provide their views into the future of what needs to be done in research, policy, and practice in the discipline.
This book emerged from an extended seminar series held in Edinburgh Law School which sought to explore the complex constitutional arrangements of the European legal space as an inter-connected mosaic. There has been much recent debate concerning the constitutional future of Europe, focusing almost exclusively upon the EU in the context of the (failed) Constitutional Treaty of 2003-5 and the subsequent Treatyof Lisbon. The premise of the book is that this focus, while indispensable, offers only a partial vision of the complex constitutional terrain of contemporary Europe. In addition, it is essential to explore other threads of normative authority within and across states, embracing internal challenges to state-level constitutional regimes; the growing jurisprudential assertiveness of the Council of Europe regime through the ECHR and various democracy-building measures; as well as Europe's ever thicker relations, both with its border regions and with broader international institutions, especially those of the United Nations. Together these developments create increasingly dense networks of constitutional authority within the European space. This fluid and multi-dimensional dynamic is difficult to classify, and indeed may seem in many ways impenetrable, but that makes the explanatory challenge all the more important and pressing. Without this fuller picture it becomes impossible to understand the legal context of Europe today or the prospects of ongoing changes. The book brings together a range of experts in law, legal theory and political science from across Europe in order to address these complex issues and to supply illustrative case-studies in the topical areas of the constitutionalisation of European labour law and European criminal law.
Criminal punishment in America is harsh and degrading--more so than anywhere else in the liberal west. Executions and long prison terms are commonplace in America. Countries like France and Germany, by contrast, are systematically mild. European offenders are rarely sent to prison, and when they are, they serve far shorter terms than their American counterparts. Why is America so comparatively harsh? In this novel work of comparative legal history, James Whitman argues that the answer lies in America's triumphant embrace of a non-hierarchical social system and distrust of state power which have contributed to a law of punishment that is more willing to degrade offenders.
Prison On Trial is the classic critique of prisons and imprisonment: a book for everyone's shelf. For anyone seeking to understand the modern penchant for locking-up ever more people, it distils the arguments for and against incarceration in a readable, accessible and authoritative way - gaining in status each time prison populations increase across large parts of the world.
What place, if any, ought cultural considerations have when we blame and punish in the criminal law? In general, to hold someone criminally responsible is to hold them blameworthy and deserving of their punishment. Background cultural factors seem to threaten this: for example, a person may be ignorant of the way things are done
The book consists of the keynote papers delivered at the 2012 WG Hart Workshop on Globalisation, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice organised by the Queen Mary Criminal Justice Centre. The volume addresses, from a cross-disciplinary perspective, the multifarious relationship between globalisation on the one hand, and criminal law and justice on the other hand. At a time when economic, political and cultural systems across different jurisdictions are increasingly becoming or are perceived to be parts of a coherent global whole, it appears that the study of crime and criminal justice policies and practices can no longer be restricted within the boundaries of individual nation-states or even particular transnational regions. But in which specific fields, to what extent, and in what ways does globalisation influence crime and criminal justice in disparate jurisdictions? Which are the factors that facilitate or prevent such influence at a domestic and/or regional level? And how does or should scholarly inquiry explore these themes? These are all key questions which are addressed by the contributors to the volume. In addition to contributions focusing on theoretical and comparative dimensions of globalisation in criminal law and justice, the volume includes sections focusing on the role of evidence in the development of criminal justice policy, the development of European criminal law and its relationship with national and transnational legal orders, and the influence of globalisation on the interplay between criminal and administrative law.
To be convicted of a crime in the United States, a person must be proven guilty “beyond a reasonable doubt.” But what is reasonable doubt? Even sophisticated legal experts find this fundamental doctrine difficult to explain. In this accessible book, James Q. Whitman digs deep into the history of the law and discovers that we have lost sight of the original purpose of “reasonable doubt.” It was not originally a legal rule at all, he shows, but a theological one. The rule as we understand it today is intended to protect the accused. But Whitman traces its history back through centuries of Christian theology and common-law history to reveal that the original concern was to protect the souls of jurors. In Christian tradition, a person who experienced doubt yet convicted an innocent defendant was guilty of a mortal sin. Jurors fearful for their own souls were reassured that they were safe, as long as their doubts were not “reasonable.” Today, the old rule of reasonable doubt survives, but it has been turned to different purposes. The result is confusion for jurors, and a serious moral challenge for our system of justice.
This volume offers a comprehensive look at criminal justice policies, practices, and research in the Nordic countries. It shows why the Scandinavian criminal justice systems are as they are, how they are different fom those in other countries, and how they are changing. Topics range from the history of violence through juvenile delinquency, juvenile justice, and sentencing to controversial contemporary policies on prostitution, victims, and organized crime. Compared to most developed countries, especially the United States, Scandinavian criminal justice systems are, and have long been humane. Punishments are moderate, prisons are small and orderly, and few people are locked up. As elsewhere in Europe, however, Scandinavian countries face social and political challenges. Populations are becoming more diverse, the region has been affected by the global recession, and conservative political parties have gained increased influence and are beginnning to politicize crime policy debates. Scandinavian approaches to to crime and punishment offer important lessons to scholars, citizens, and policy makers in other coutnries. Their present may be our future. More ominously if they sucuumb to the xenophobic and popuilist political pressures that exist everywhere, ours may be theirs.
"It is eight years since the first edition of this book was published. Where relevant, I have sought to update the argument with new case and statute law. I have also developed the analysis, especially in Chapter 3, where a closer link between the two main sections, on motive and intention and indirect intention, is established"--
Since ancient times, terror tactics have been used to achieve political ends and likely will continue into the foreseeable future. Preserving national security and the safety of civilian populations while maintaining democratic principles and respecting human rights requires a delicate balancing act. In democracies, monitoring that balance typically falls to the courts. Courts and Terrorism examines how judiciaries in nine separate nations have responded, not just to the current wave of Al Qaeda threats, but also to narco-trafficking, domestic terrorism and organized crime syndicates. Terrorism is not a new phenomenon, and even though the reactions have varied significantly, common themes emerge. This volume discusses eleven case studies and analyzes the experiences of these various nations in their battles with terrorism to reveal the judicial quandary for democratic governance and the rule of law in the twenty-first century.
Since 2008 increasing pirate activities in Somalia, the Gulf of Aden, and the Indian Ocean have once again drawn the international community's attention to piracy and armed robbery at sea. States are resolved to repress these impediments to the free flow of trade and navigation. To this end a number of multinational counter-piracy missions have been deployed to the region. This book describes the enforcement powers that States may rely upon in their quest to repress piracy in the larger Gulf of Aden region. The piracy rules of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) and the legal safeguards applicable to maritime interception operations are scrutinized before the analysis turns to the criminal prosecution of pirates and armed robbers at sea. The discussion includes so-called shiprider agreements, the transfers of alleged offenders to regional states, the jurisdictional bases for prosecuting pirates, and the feasibility of an international(ized) venue for their trial. In addressing a range of relevant issues, this book presents a detailed and comprehensive up-to-date analysis of the legal issues pertaining to the repression of piracy and armed robbery at sea and assesses whether the currently existing legal regime is still adequate to effectively counter piracy in the 21st century.

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