This resource guides the reader through the process of geography fieldwork projects, from collecting the information to processing and presenting it. Information on sampling, dealing with different areas such as river channels and urban landscapes, and tips on using the internet are followed by explanations of cartography, statistical methods, and finally laying out and organizing a presentation.
This book encourages students to critically engage with the reasons for doing fieldwork and what they can get out, explains methods and contexts, and links the fieldwork with wider academic topics. It looks beyond the contents of research projects and field visits to address the wider experience of fieldwork: working in groups; understanding your ethical position; and opening your eyes, ears and minds to the wider possibilities of your trip. Throughout the book, the authors present first person descriptions of field experiences and predicaments, written by fieldtrip leaders and students from around the world including the U.K., U.S.A., Canada, Singapore, and South Africa.
This book provides a comprehensive overview of contemporary thought and practice in teaching geography. It is designed to support continuing professional development and reflective practice in geography education by: encouraging a critical understanding of the literature and concepts; stimulating teachers to continue with personal and professional development; and providing professionally relevant knowledge, understanding, skills and values. Drawn from a wide range of eminent geographers and experienced practitioners, the authors cover: progress in geography - changing viewpoints; the geography curriculum - development planning and issues; research and geography teaching - why and how research matters. Thi
This text gives students doing geography fieldwork projects guidance on careful planning and organization, and explains how to write final reports. It allows students to practice and learn appropriate fieldwork techniques and shows how to select and apply these skills in real investigations. Divided into six core topic areas, for each topic there is a trial run project for students to work through as an example of an actual fieldwork investigation. This is followed by a short project and an investigation that can be carried out, including techniques required, equipment needed and likely sources of information. Extra investigations and a full list of sources of information to help with projects are available on the accomanying website.
Geography, environment, sustainability, culture and education standing alone or in any combination, provide the ingredients for a variety of stews. They are all difficult to define and they generate endless debates for theoreticians and practitioners about their meaning and significance. The editors have divided the chapters that follow into two parts in an effort to unit these diverse disciplines. Part 1 is concerned with cultural foundations and curriculum issues related to geographical and environmental education for sustainability. Part 2 comprises a series of chapters presenting education for sustainability in the contexts of national cultures.
The last text on the geography of Uganda was written in 1975 by Professor Brian Langlands. Since the last publication, Uganda has undergone numerous changes. The population has more than tripled from less than 10 million to almost 30 million. The district boundaries have changed and the number of districts increases every year. New districts are created every year. Economic productivity has also shifted over the years. Furthermore, new and emerging diseases have surfaced in Uganda. This book addresses the need for an updated document on the geography of Uganda. This book was written by a joint group of Ugandan geographers. The contributors authored chapters in their areas of specialization. There are a total of twelve chapters in the book. These chapters are based on the most current data available.
Maximise every student's grade potential with a step-by-step approach to learning, improving and applying the geographical and fieldwork skills they need to achieve stand-out success under the reformed OCR A and B GCSE Geography specifications. - Provides a complete, tailor-made solution to teaching the cartographic, graphical, numerical and statistical skills emphasised in the 2016 OCR A and B GCSE Geography specifications - Helps you prepare students for the changed fieldwork assessments and new question formats with a dedicated section on geographical enquiries - Supports students of varying abilities by moving from clear explanations of each skill to easy-to-follow guidance on applying the skills in an examination context - Offers plenty of opportunities to put newly-acquired skills into practice through a range of activities for all learners, as well as extension tasks designed for students targeting the top grades - Boosts students' confidence tackling terminal assessment with skills-focused exam-style questions and insider tips on common question types and topics - Cuts down your marking time and enables students to monitor their own progress by including answers for every activity and exam-style question
New Directions in Geographical Fieldwork is for advanced level and undergraduate students. It provides a succinct review of recent changes in geographical and environmental thinking, and it considers their influence on the focus of practical geographical investigations and on how the findings are used. New developments in learning through field experience are outlined, illustrating the shift from traditional field work methods, through quantitative methods, to more recent humanistic approaches. Topics covered include considering range from the importance of social values and the opportunities available for extending the outcomes of fieldwork into environmental action.
An updated and revised third edition of this popular and well established text, designed for the AS/A-level specifications.
Fieldwork is widely practiced but little written about, yet accounts of the exotic, mundane, complex, and often dangerous are central to not only sociology and anthropology but also geography, social psychology, and criminology. This handbook presents the first major overview of this method in all its variety, introducing the reader to the strengths, weaknesses, and "real world" applications of fieldwork techniques.
Research and Fieldwork in Development explores both traditional and cutting edge research methods, from interviews and ethnography to spatial data and digital methods. Each chapter provides the reader with an understanding of the theoretical basis of research methods, reflects upon their practice and outlines appropriate analysis techniques. The text also provides a cutting edge focus on the role of new media and technologies in conducting research. The final chapters return to a set of broader concerns in development research, providing a new and dynamic set of engagements with ethics and risk in fieldwork, integrating methods and engaging development research methods with knowledge exchange practices. Each chapter is supported by several case studies written by global experts within the field, documenting encounters and experiences and linking theory to practice. Each chapter is also complimented by an end of chapter summary, suggestions for further reading and websites, and questions for further reflection and practice. The text critically locates development research within the field of international development to give an accessible and comprehensive introduction to development research methods. This book provides an invaluable overview to the practice of international development research and serves as an essential resource for undergraduate and postgraduate student embarking of development fieldwork. It is supported by online resources including extended bibliographies for each chapter, example risk and ethic forms, example policy briefing notes, research reports, links to websites and data sources.
Choosing to do fieldwork overseas, particularly in the Global South, is a challenge in itself. The researcher faces logistical complications, health and safety issues, cultural differences, language barriers, and much more. But permeating the entire fieldwork experience are a range of intermediating ethical issues. While many researchers seek to follow institutional and disciplinary guidelines on ethical research practice, the reality is that each situation is unique and the individual researcher must negotiate their own path through a variety of ethical challenges and dilemmas. This book was created to share such experiences, to serve not as a manual for ethical practice but rather as a place for reflection and mutual learning. Since ethical issues face the researcher at every turn and cannot be compartmentalized into one part of the research process, this book puts them at the very center of the discussion and uses them as the lens with which to view different stages of fieldwork. The book covers four thematic areas: ethical challenges in the field; ethical dimensions of researcher identity; ethical issues relating to research methods; and ethical dilemmas of engagement with a variety of actors. This volume also provides fresh insights by drawing on the experiences of research students rather than those of established academics. The contributors describe research conducted for their master’s degrees and doctorates, offering honest and self-critical reflections on how they negotiated ethical challenges and dilemmas. The chapters cover fieldwork carried out in countries across Africa, Asia, and Latin America on a broad sweep of development-related topics. This book should have wide appeal to undergraduates, postgraduates, and early-career researchers working under the broad umbrella of development studies. Although focused on fieldwork in the Global South, the discussions and reflections are relevant to field research in many other countries and contexts.
Geographers regard fieldwork as a vital instrument for understanding our world through direct experience, for gathering basic data about this world, and as a fundamental method for enacting geographical education. The range of international geography and educational experts who contributed to this volume has demonstrated that the concept of fieldwork has a considerable history in the field of geography. They have demonstrated that the theoretical aspects of fieldwork have been interpreted differently in regions around the world, but the importance of fieldwork remains strong globally. A fresh look at the pedagogic implications for fieldwork in formal education offers ideas both for promoting it in geographical education and for maintaining its place in the geography curriculum. Audience: Forward-looking geographers and educators now recognise that alternative strategies, especially those involving the use of information technology, should be developed to reaffirm the centrality of fieldwork in geographical and wider education.
In A Level syllabuses students must undertake personal investigative work based on first-hand and secondary data. This element of the exam accounts for between 16.7 and 20 per cent of the total mark in the case of all examining boards. Fieldwork itself has also changed in recent years, moving away from the traditional fieldwork day/week attended by the whole class, to personal investigation where students select an enquiry and are responsible for assessing methodologies, gathering data and writing up a report. This text tackles these areas, giving particular guidance to self-study. It explores skills and techniques, constructing questionnaires, using statistical analysis and gives advice on selecting a title. Sections relate to all the main themes of the syllabus.
In recent years ever-increasing concerns about ethical dimensions of fieldwork practice have forced anthropologists and other social scientists to radically reconsider the nature, process, and outcomes of fieldwork: what should we be doing, how, for whom, and to what end? In this volume, practitioners from across anthropological disciplines-social and biological anthropology and primatology-come together to question and compare the ethical regulation of fieldwork, what is common to their practices, and what is distinctive to each discipline. Contributors probe a rich variety of contemporary questions: the new, unique problems raised by conducting fieldwork online and via email; the potential dangers of primatological fieldwork for locals, primates, the environment, and the fieldworkers themselves; the problems of studying the military; and the role of ethical clearance for anthropologists involved in international health programs. The distinctive aim of this book is to develop of a transdisciplinary anthropology at the methodological, not theoretical, level.
Debates in Geography Education encourages student and practising teachers to engage with and reflect on key issues, concepts and debates in their specialist subject teaching. It aims to enable geography teachers to reach their own informed judgements and argue their point of view with deeper theoretical knowledge and understanding. Expert editors and contributors provide a balance of experience and perspectives and offer international, historical and policy contexts, evidence informed classroom debates and a glimpse of the subject's expanding horizons. Debates considered include: what constitutes knowledge in geography? constructing the curriculum; how do we link assessment to making progress in geography? the contribution of fieldwork and outdoor experiences; technology and media; how we use Geographical Information; how geography contributes to 'global learning'; sustainable development and geography education. The comprehensive, rigorous coverage of these key issues, together with carefully annotated selected further reading, reflective questions and a range of specific web-based resources, will help support shape your own research and writing. Debates in Geography Education is a source of knowledge, experience and debate that will be essential reading for all students studying at Masters level, practising teachers who want to develop a better understanding of the issues that shape their practice, and Education Studies students considering in-depth subject teaching.
A new series of full-coverage resources developed for the AQA 2016 A/AS Level Geography specification. This full-colour Student Book covers all core and optional units for the AQA AS and A Level Geography specification for first teaching from September 2016. Students are encouraged to develop links between physical and human topics, understand systems, processes, and acquire geographical skills. Helping to bridge the gap from GCSE to A Level, it also provides support for fieldwork skills and for the geographical investigation at A Level. A 'Maths for geographers' feature helps students develop and apply their mathematical and statistical skills, and a range of assessment-style questions support students in developing their exam skills.

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