Illustrations and rhymes celebrate what makes each season special, from baby chicks in the spring through a snowman in the winter.
Illustrations and rhymes celebrate what makes each season special, from baby chicks in the spring through a snowman in the winter.
An introduction to the growing process, harvesting, types, and uses for apples.
Brown bear politely offers to surrender his den to nosy skunk Twelve nature-themed haiku accompanied by lush illustrations take the reader from January to December. A great way to introduce children to the traditional Japanese poetry form.
Follows a young girl named Lilly as she enjoys different activities during each season of the year, from dancing in the park in the spring to throwing snowballs in the winter.
Documents the award-winning writer's experiences of living, working, and raising twin sons in Rome during the year following his receipt of a prestigious Rome Prize stipend, a period during which he attended the vigil of the dying John Paul II, brought his children on a snowy visit to the Pantheon, and befriended numerous locals. Reprint. 35,000 first printing.
Some little ones want to be princesses; others want to be dragons. The message of this book is that you can actually be both! There are lots of things you can be: a little wild, a little sweet. A little polite, a little troublesome. A little dainty, a little dragony. There's nothing stopping you from being just what you want to be . . . so which would you rather be: a princess or a dragon? Here's just the book to help you sort through that difficult question. You might be surprised at what you decide by its end.
Examines how fall brings observable changes in weather, nature, and people.
A guide to reconnecting holidays to the rhythms of nature instructs readers on how to use myths, folklore, and poetry from around the world to create life-giving, nature-based rituals and ceremonies for their own unique celebrations of a range of international holidays. Original.
For millennia, the passing seasons and their rhythms have marked our progress through the year. But what do they mean to us now that we lead increasingly atomized and urban lives and our weather becomes ever more unpredictable or extreme? Will it matter if we no longer hear, even notice, the first cuckoo call of spring or rejoice in the mellow fruits of harvest festival? How much will we lose if we can no longer find either refuge or reassurance in the greater natural—and meteorological—scheme of things? Nick Groom's splendidly rich and encyclopedic book is an unabashed celebration of the English seasons and the trove of strange folklore and often stranger fact they have accumulated over the centuries. Each season and its particular history are given their full due, and these chapters are interwoven with others on the calendar and how the year and months have come to be measured, on important dates and festivals such as Easter, May Day and, of course, Christmas, on that defining first cuckoo call, on national attitudes to weather, our seasonal relationship with the land and horticulture and much more. The author expresses the hope that his book will not prove an elegy: only time will tell.
An interactive follow-up to the unique and inspiring Beautiful Oops! art activity book encourages young readers to turn every mistake into something beautiful. The friendly, frolicsome alligator from the original book guides readers through the various folded, crumpled, torn, die-cut, bent, smudged, and lift-the flap spreads, prompting them to see what beautiful art they can make out a material that many would consider trash: Finish the words on a torn piece of paper to make a poem. Turn this ink spill into a piece of art. Rip a picture out of the book, tear it into pieces, and use the scraps to create a new piece of art. The sky is the limit!
Given blank books by their mother, Seymour, Fiona, and Wilbur let their imaginations fly, then put their stories, poems, and pictures together in a single, shared book.
Pictures depict busy people in a town throughout the year.
A wise, passionate account of the pleasures of travelling solo In our increasingly frantic daily lives, many people are genuinely fearful of the prospect of solitude, but time alone can be both rich and restorative, especially when travelling. Through on-the-ground reporting and recounting the experiences of artists, writers, and innovators who cherished solitude, Stephanie Rosenbloom considers how being alone as a traveller--and even in one's own city--is conducive to becoming acutely aware of the sensual details of the world--patterns, textures, colors, tastes, sounds--in ways that are difficult to do in the company of others. Alone Time is divided into four parts, each set in a different city, in a different season, in a single year. The destinations--Paris, Istanbul, Florence, New York--are all pedestrian-friendly, allowing travelers to slow down and appreciate casual pleasures instead of hurtling through museums and posting photos to Instagram. Each section spotlights a different theme associated with the joys and benefits of time alone and how it can enable people to enrich their lives--facilitating creativity, learning, self-reliance, as well as the ability to experiment and change. Rosenbloom incorporates insights from psychologists and sociologists who have studied solitude and happiness, and explores such topics as dining alone, learning to savor, discovering interests and passions, and finding or creating silent spaces. Her engaging and elegant prose makes Alone Time as warmly intimate an account as the details of a trip shared by a beloved friend--and will have its many readers eager to set off on their own solo adventures.
For fifty seasons Lute Olson has been teaching young athletes the skills of basketball---and life. Starting as a high school coach, he worked his way to the top of the basketball world, winning more than a thousand games, a national championship, and a wo
The sun shines down on us, giving warmth and light. But did you know that the sun also makes the seasons? As the earth makes one complete rotation around the sun every year, the seasons on the earth change -- from winter to spring to summer to fall and back to winter again. Find out how the light from the sun affects life on the earth for all living things in this look at the only star in our solar system.
A landmark work of environmental philosophy that seeks to transform the debate about climate change. As the icecaps melt and the sea levels rise around the globe—threatening human existence as we know it—climate change has become one of the most urgent and controversial issues of our time. For most people, however, trying to understand the science, politics, and arguments on either side can be dizzying, leading to frustrating and unproductive debates. Now, in this groundbreaking new work, two of our most renowned thinkers present the realities of global warming in the most human of terms—everyday conversation—showing us how to convince even the most stubborn of skeptics as to why we need to act now. Indeed, through compelling Socratic dialogues, Philip Kitcher and Evelyn Fox Keller tackle some of the thorniest questions facing mankind today: Is climate change real? Is climate change as urgent as the “scientists” make it out to be? How much of our current way of life should we sacrifice to help out a generation that won’t even be born for another hundred years? Who would pay for the enormous costs of making the planet "green?" What sort of global political arrangement would be needed for serious action? These crucial questions play out through familiar circumstances, from an older husband and wife considering whether they should reduce their carbon footprint, to a first date that evolves into a passionate discussion about whether one person can actually make a difference, to a breakfast that becomes an examination over whether or not global warming is really happening. Entertaining, widely accessible, and thoroughly original, the result promises to inspire dialogue in many places, while also giving us a line of reasoning that explodes the so-far impenetrable barriers of obfuscation that have surrounded the discussion. While the Paris Agreement was an historic achievement that brought solutions within the realm of possibility, The Seasons Alter is a watershed book that will show us how to make those possibilities a reality.
Once again, Plough has brought together a winning collection of old and new songs from around the globe. This time the theme is the four seasons, and the joys of childhood associated with each - robins and kites, seashells and fireflies, pumpkins and leaf piles, snowmen and ice skates. Swinger herself composed several of the tunes, but most are time-tested folk melodies. Gathered from dozens of countries - including Finland, Japan, Sweden, Jamaica, Poland, China, Russia, Germany, England, and Peru - they represent a broad spectrum of traditions that will suit the multi-cultural sensibilities of almost any home or school. the lyrics include poems by such well-known children's authors as Kate Greenaway, Robert Louis Stevenson, Eleanor Farjeon, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Lois Lenski.
No matter how far apart they are, a little girl and her grandfather share a cup of tea every day at half past three.

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