Taken literally, the title "All of Statistics" is an exaggeration. But in spirit, the title is apt, as the book does cover a much broader range of topics than a typical introductory book on mathematical statistics. This book is for people who want to learn probability and statistics quickly. It is suitable for graduate or advanced undergraduate students in computer science, mathematics, statistics, and related disciplines. The book includes modern topics like non-parametric curve estimation, bootstrapping, and classification, topics that are usually relegated to follow-up courses. The reader is presumed to know calculus and a little linear algebra. No previous knowledge of probability and statistics is required. Statistics, data mining, and machine learning are all concerned with collecting and analysing data.
This book surveys a broad range of topics in probability and mathematical statistics. It provides the statistical background that a computer scientist needs to work in the area of machine learning.
This text provides the reader with a single book where they can find accounts of a number of up-to-date issues in nonparametric inference. The book is aimed at Masters or PhD level students in statistics, computer science, and engineering. It is also suitable for researchers who want to get up to speed quickly on modern nonparametric methods. It covers a wide range of topics including the bootstrap, the nonparametric delta method, nonparametric regression, density estimation, orthogonal function methods, minimax estimation, nonparametric confidence sets, and wavelets. The book’s dual approach includes a mixture of methodology and theory.
This book offers a brief course in statistical inference that requires only a basic familiarity with probability and matrix and linear algebra. Ninety problems with solutions make it an ideal choice for self-study as well as a helpful review of a wide-ranging topic with important uses to professionals in business, government, public administration, and other fields. 2011 edition.
This thoroughly updated second edition combines the latest software applications with the benefits of modern resampling techniques Resampling helps students understand the meaning of sampling distributions, sampling variability, P-values, hypothesis tests, and confidence intervals. The second edition of Mathematical Statistics with Resampling and R combines modern resampling techniques and mathematical statistics. This book has been classroom-tested to ensure an accessible presentation, uses the powerful and flexible computer language R for data analysis and explores the benefits of modern resampling techniques. This book offers an introduction to permutation tests and bootstrap methods that can serve to motivate classical inference methods. The book strikes a balance between theory, computing, and applications, and the new edition explores additional topics including consulting, paired t test, ANOVA and Google Interview Questions. Throughout the book, new and updated case studies are included representing a diverse range of subjects such as flight delays, birth weights of babies, and telephone company repair times. These illustrate the relevance of the real-world applications of the material. This new edition: • Puts the focus on statistical consulting that emphasizes giving a client an understanding of data and goes beyond typical expectations • Presents new material on topics such as the paired t test, Fisher's Exact Test and the EM algorithm • Offers a new section on "Google Interview Questions" that illustrates statistical thinking • Provides a new chapter on ANOVA • Contains more exercises and updated case studies, data sets, and R code Written for undergraduate students in a mathematical statistics course as well as practitioners and researchers, the second edition of Mathematical Statistics with Resampling and R presents a revised and updated guide for applying the most current resampling techniques to mathematical statistics.
This outstanding text by a foremost econometrician combines instruction in probability and statistics with econometrics in a rigorous but relatively nontechnical manner. Unlike many statistics texts, it discusses regression analysis in depth. And unlike many econometrics texts, it offers a thorough treatment of statistics. Although its only mathematical requirement is multivariate calculus, it challenges the student to think deeply about basic concepts. The coverage of probability and statistics includes best prediction and best linear prediction, the joint distribution of a continuous and discrete random variable, large sample theory, and the properties of the maximum likelihood estimator. Exercises at the end of each chapter reinforce the many illustrative examples and diagrams. Believing that students should acquire the habit of questioning conventional statistical techniques, Takeshi Amemiya discusses the problem of choosing estimators and compares various criteria for ranking them. He also evaluates classical hypothesis testing critically, giving the realistic case of testing a composite null against a composite alternative. He frequently adopts a Bayesian approach because it provides a useful pedagogical framework for discussing many fundamental issues in statistical inference. Turning to regression, Amemiya presents the classical bivariate model in the conventional summation notation. He follows with a brief introduction to matrix analysis and multiple regression in matrix notation. Finally, he describes various generalizations of the classical regression model and certain other statistical models extensively used in econometrics and other applications in social science.
Casella and Berger's new edition builds the theoretical statistics from the first principals of probability theory. Thoroughly and completely, the authors start with the basics of probability and then move on to develop the theory of statistical inference using techniques, definitions, and statistical concepts.
In this classic of statistical mathematical theory, Harald Cramér joins the two major lines of development in the field: while British and American statisticians were developing the science of statistical inference, French and Russian probabilitists transformed the classical calculus of probability into a rigorous and pure mathematical theory. The result of Cramér's work is a masterly exposition of the mathematical methods of modern statistics that set the standard that others have since sought to follow. For anyone with a working knowledge of undergraduate mathematics the book is self contained. The first part is an introduction to the fundamental concept of a distribution and of integration with respect to a distribution. The second part contains the general theory of random variables and probability distributions while the third is devoted to the theory of sampling, statistical estimation, and tests of significance.
A text that stresses the general concepts of the theory of statistics Theoretical Statistics provides a systematic statement of the theory of statistics, emphasizing general concepts rather than mathematical rigor. Chapters 1 through 3 provide an overview of statistics and discuss some of the basic philosophical ideas and problems behind statistical procedures. Chapters 4 and 5 cover hypothesis testing with simple and null hypotheses, respectively. Subsequent chapters discuss non-parametrics, interval estimation, point estimation, asymptotics, Bayesian procedure, and deviation theory. Student familiarity with standard statistical techniques is assumed.
This textbook is designed to give an engaging introduction to statistics and the art of data analysis. The unique scope includes, but also goes beyond, classical methodology associated with the normal distribution. What if the normal model is not valid for a particular data set? This cutting-edge approach provides the alternatives. It is an introduction to the world and possibilities of statistics that uses exercises, computer analyses, and simulations throughout the core lessons. These elementary statistical methods are intuitive. Counting and ranking features prominently in the text. Nonparametric methods, for instance, are often based on counts and ranks and are very easy to integrate into an introductory course.​ The ease of computation with advanced calculators and statistical software, both of which factor into this text, allows important techniques to be introduced earlier in the study of statistics. This book's novel scope also includes measuring symmetry with Walsh averages, finding a nonparametric regression line, jackknifing, and bootstrapping​. Concepts and techniques are explored through practical problems. Quantitative reasoning is at the core of so many professions and academic disciplines, and this book opens the door to the most modern possibilities.
Developed from lecture notes and ready to be used for a course on the graduate level, this concise text aims to introduce the fundamental concepts of nonparametric estimation theory while maintaining the exposition suitable for a first approach in the field.
​This book is for students and researchers who have had a first year graduate level mathematical statistics course. It covers classical likelihood, Bayesian, and permutation inference; an introduction to basic asymptotic distribution theory; and modern topics like M-estimation, the jackknife, and the bootstrap. R code is woven throughout the text, and there are a large number of examples and problems. An important goal has been to make the topics accessible to a wide audience, with little overt reliance on measure theory. A typical semester course consists of Chapters 1-6 (likelihood-based estimation and testing, Bayesian inference, basic asymptotic results) plus selections from M-estimation and related testing and resampling methodology. Dennis Boos and Len Stefanski are professors in the Department of Statistics at North Carolina State. Their research has been eclectic, often with a robustness angle, although Stefanski is also known for research concentrated on measurement error, including a co-authored book on non-linear measurement error models. In recent years the authors have jointly worked on variable selection methods. ​
Statistics is a subject with a vast field of application, involving problems which vary widely in their character and complexity.However, in tackling these, we use a relatively small core of central ideas and methods. This book attempts to concentrateattention on these ideas: they are placed in a general settingand illustrated by relatively simple examples, avoidingwherever possible the extraneous difficulties of complicatedmathematical manipulation.In order to compress the central body of ideas into a smallvolume, it is necessary to assume a fair degree of mathematicalsophistication on the part of the reader, and the book is intendedfor students of mathematics who are already accustomed tothinking in rather general terms about spaces and functions
This textbook provides a coherent introduction to the main concepts and methods of one-parameter statistical inference. Intended for students of Mathematics taking their first course in Statistics, the focus is on Statistics for Mathematicians rather than on Mathematical Statistics. The goal is not to focus on the mathematical/theoretical aspects of the subject, but rather to provide an introduction to the subject tailored to the mindset and tastes of Mathematics students, who are sometimes turned off by the informal nature of Statistics courses. This book can be used as the basis for an elementary semester-long first course on Statistics with a firm sense of direction that does not sacrifice rigor. The deeper goal of the text is to attract the attention of promising Mathematics students.
The third edition of Testing Statistical Hypotheses updates and expands upon the classic graduate text, emphasizing optimality theory for hypothesis testing and confidence sets. The principal additions include a rigorous treatment of large sample optimality, together with the requisite tools. In addition, an introduction to the theory of resampling methods such as the bootstrap is developed. The sections on multiple testing and goodness of fit testing are expanded. The text is suitable for Ph.D. students in statistics and includes over 300 new problems out of a total of more than 760.
The exercises are grouped into seven chapters with titles matching those in the author's Mathematical Statistics. Can also be used as a stand-alone because exercises and solutions are comprehensible independently of their source, and notation and terminology are explained in the front of the book. Suitable for self-study for a statistics Ph.D. qualifying exam.
Core Statistics is a compact starter course on the theory, models, and computational tools needed to make informed use of powerful statistical methods.
In this definitive book, D. R. Cox gives a comprehensive and balanced appraisal of statistical inference. He develops the key concepts, describing and comparing the main ideas and controversies over foundational issues that have been keenly argued for more than two-hundred years. Continuing a sixty-year career of major contributions to statistical thought, no one is better placed to give this much-needed account of the field. An appendix gives a more personal assessment of the merits of different ideas. The content ranges from the traditional to the contemporary. While specific applications are not treated, the book is strongly motivated by applications across the sciences and associated technologies. The mathematics is kept as elementary as feasible, though previous knowledge of statistics is assumed. The book will be valued by every user or student of statistics who is serious about understanding the uncertainty inherent in conclusions from statistical analyses.
Machine learning allows computers to learn and discern patterns without actually being programmed. When Statistical techniques and machine learning are combined together they are a powerful tool for analysing various kinds of data in many computer science/engineering areas including, image processing, speech processing, natural language processing, robot control, as well as in fundamental sciences such as biology, medicine, astronomy, physics, and materials. Introduction to Statistical Machine Learning provides a general introduction to machine learning that covers a wide range of topics concisely and will help you bridge the gap between theory and practice. Part I discusses the fundamental concepts of statistics and probability that are used in describing machine learning algorithms. Part II and Part III explain the two major approaches of machine learning techniques; generative methods and discriminative methods. While Part III provides an in-depth look at advanced topics that play essential roles in making machine learning algorithms more useful in practice. The accompanying MATLAB/Octave programs provide you with the necessary practical skills needed to accomplish a wide range of data analysis tasks. Provides the necessary background material to understand machine learning such as statistics, probability, linear algebra, and calculus. Complete coverage of the generative approach to statistical pattern recognition and the discriminative approach to statistical machine learning. Includes MATLAB/Octave programs so that readers can test the algorithms numerically and acquire both mathematical and practical skills in a wide range of data analysis tasks Discusses a wide range of applications in machine learning and statistics and provides examples drawn from image processing, speech processing, natural language processing, robot control, as well as biology, medicine, astronomy, physics, and materials.

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