The most gripping, intimate, and inspiring account of Pearl Harbor. The first memoir ever published by a USS Arizona survivor. At 8:10 a.m. on December 7, 1941, Seaman First Class Donald Stratton was consumed by an inferno. A million pounds of explosives had detonated beneath his battle station aboard the USS Arizona, barely fifteen minutes into Japan’s surprise attack on American forces at Pearl Harbor. Near death and burned across two thirds of his body, Don, a nineteen-year-old Nebraskan who had been steeled by the Great Depression and Dust Bowl, summoned the will to haul himself hand over hand across a rope tethered to a neighboring vessel. Forty-five feet below, the harbor’s flaming, oil-slick water boiled with enemy bullets; all around him the world tore itself apart. In this extraordinary, never-before-told eyewitness account of the Pearl Harbor attack—the only memoir ever written by a survivor of the USS Arizona—ninety-four-year-old veteran Donald Stratton finally shares his unforgettable personal tale of bravery and survival on December 7, 1941, his harrowing recovery, and his inspiring determination to return to the fight. Don and four other sailors made it safely across the same line that morning, a small miracle on a day that claimed the lives of 1,177 of their Arizona shipmates—approximately half the American fatalaties at Pearl Harbor. Sent to military hospitals for a year, Don refused doctors’ advice to amputate his limbs and battled to relearn how to walk. The U.S. Navy gave him a medical discharge, believing he would never again be fit for service, but Don had unfinished business. In June 1944, he sailed back into the teeth of the Pacific War on a destroyer, destined for combat in the crucial battles of Leyte Gulf, Luzon, and Okinawa, thus earning the distinction of having been present for the opening shots and the final major battle of America’s Second World War. As the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack approaches, Don, a great-grandfather of five and one of six living survivors of the Arizona, offers an unprecedentedly intimate reflection on the tragedy that drew America into the greatest armed conflict in history. All the Gallant Men is a book for the ages, one of the most remarkable—and remarkably inspiring—memoirs of any kind to appear in recent years.
THE FIRST MEMOIR BY A USS ARIZONA SURVIVOR: Donald Stratton, one of the battleship's five living heroes, delivers a "powerful" and "intimate"* eyewitness account of Pearl Harbor and his unforgettable return to the fight At 8:10 a.m. on December 7, 1941, Seaman First Class Donald Stratton was consumed by an inferno. A million pounds of explosives had detonated beneath his battle station aboard the USS Arizona, barely fifteen minutes into Japan’s surprise attack on American forces at Pearl Harbor. Near death and burned across two thirds of his body, Don, a nineteen-year-old Nebraskan who had been steeled by the Great Depression and Dust Bowl, summoned the will to haul himself hand over hand across a rope tethered to a neighboring vessel. Forty-five feet below, the harbor’s flaming, oil-slick water boiled with enemy bullets; all around him the world tore itself apart. In this extraordinary, never-before-told eyewitness account of the Pearl Harbor attack—the only memoir ever written by a survivor of the USS Arizona—ninety-four-year-old veteran Donald Stratton finally shares his unforgettable personal tale of bravery and survival on December 7, 1941, his harrowing recovery, and his inspiring determination to return to the fight. Don and four other sailors made it safely across the same line that morning, a small miracle on a day that claimed the lives of 1,177 of their Arizona shipmates—approximately half the American fatalaties at Pearl Harbor. Sent to military hospitals for a year, Don refused doctors’ advice to amputate his limbs and battled to relearn how to walk. The U.S. Navy gave him a medical discharge, believing he would never again be fit for service, but Don had unfinished business. In June 1944, he sailed back into the teeth of the Pacific War on a destroyer, destined for combat in the crucial battles of Leyte Gulf, Luzon, and Okinawa, thus earning the distinction of having been present for the opening shots and the final major battle of America’s Second World War. As the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack approaches, Don, a great-grandfather of five and one of six living survivors of the Arizona, offers an unprecedentedly intimate reflection on the tragedy that drew America into the greatest armed conflict in history. All the Gallant Men is a book for the ages, one of the most remarkable—and remarkably inspiring—memoirs of any kind to appear in recent years. *Library Journal
War is uncomfortable for Christians, and worldwide war is unfamiliar for today’s generations. Jim Downing reflects on his illustrious military career, including his experience during the bombing of Pearl Harbor, to show how we can be people of faith during troubled times. The natural human impulse is to run from attack. Jim Downing—along with countless other soldiers and sailors at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941—ran toward it, fighting to rescue his fellow navy men, to protect loved ones and civilians on the island, and to find the redemptive path forward from a devastating war. We are protected from war these days, but there was a time when war was very present in our lives, and in The Other Side of Infamy we learn from a veteran of Pearl Harbor and World War II what it means to follow Jesus into and through every danger, toil, and snare.
Laying where she sank, in the silt of Pearl Harbor, the USS Arizona has impacted millions of lives since the milli-second BOOM! that split her hull and snuffed out the lives of 1177 men aboard her. This book pays tribute to the ship and her crews, telling of the fascinating life she led before her demise with rarely-before-seen pictures and poignant stories of her symbolism throughout the years.
Mark Cutter is now an orphan. Someday, he wants to become a cop like his father. When he finds that a drug dealing murderer works right next door, Mark and his friends set out to catch the bad guys. But it won't be easy. A nutty aunt and rude cousins hinder them. But raw courage can't be stopped. In this exciting story, Mark Cutter will discover the courage he's had all along while facing dangers at every turn.
"A Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter chronicles the 12 days leading up to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, examining the miscommunications, clues, missteps and racist assumptions that may have been behind America's failure to safeguard against the tragedy,"--NoveList.
A Navy salvage diver recounts his experience in the effort to save the lives of sailors trapped in sinking ships after the attack on Pearl Harbor.
On political conditions in Punjab, India, with particular reference to the role of Santa Jaranaila Siṅgha, 1947-1984, who died in Golden Temple (Amritsar) Assault.
The Dogra Regiment traces its ancestry primarily to three Regiments of the East India Company's Bengal Army. These three Regiments were the 37m, the 38m and the 41" Regiment of Bengal Infantry. Over the years, these Regiments were to undergo many vicissitudes but the bloodlines of today's proud Dogra Regiment are clearly traceable to those early days. Interestingly, there were Dogra companies in many other North Indian regiments of the John Company. The Dogra kings of Jammu and Kashmir and other Princely States also maintained a sizable force of Dogra soldiers as State Forces, which have, upon Independence, been absorbed into the Indian Army, as were the forces of some of the lesser Princely States. Although the Dogras are an agricultural people, their martial traditions run deep and they carry with them the habits and attitudes of a martial clan. The Dogras are well known for their courtly manners, great courage and strong powers of physical endurance. The military commanders, over the years, have had nothing but unstinted praise for the Dogra soldiers, making them highly desirable recruits for the Armed Forces. From the mud and mire of Givenchy to the dreary desert sands of Mesopotamia during World War I, from the plantations of Malaya to the leech infested jungles of Burma during World War II, the brave Dogra soldier won the admiration and respect of one and all. The dawn of Independence saw this veteran Regiment grow from strength to strength, giving an unrivaled account of itself in every skirmish and encounter, whether on the borders of the Motherland or in counter terrorism operations. The intrepid Dogra went on to win international acclaim on many an occasion whilewearing the coveted blue berets of the United Nations. This illustrated history presents an insight into the ethos of the Dogras and traces the growth of the Dogra Regiment over the last 117 years and more. Numerous rare and historic photographs and maps, that have been painstakingly restored, embellish this book, which shall be of great interest to the military historian and indeed to all those connected with the Indian Armed Forces.
Willie Stark's obsession with political power leads to the ultimate corruption of his gubernatorial administration.
Kirkus Indie Review: "A convincing analysis of Japan's role in World War II and a reasonable argument for a logic process that led to the attack on Pearl Harbor." US Review of Books: "RECOMMENDED" Foreword Clarion Review : "FOUR STARS" "offers genuine insight on how and why the events of December 7, 1941, took place. [The] description of the personalities involved, such as Admiral Yamamoto and Navy Chief of Staff Nagano, and the political relationship between them and the warlords is riveting." It was an audacious attack. The Sunday morning bombing of Pearl Harbor by the Imperial Japanese Navy tore the heart out of the proud Pacific Fleet and dealt the Americans a stunning defeat. It was a futile attack, made against a nation the Japanese could not defeat, and done in such a way as could only enrage the Americans. No military goal was advanced by the operation. The Japanese were well aware of all this, none more so than Admiral Yamamoto, Commander of the Imperial Fleet. Yet in 1941, against the advice of the entire Japanese naval command, this adamant opponent of conflict with the United States insisted on beginning a war against the British and Dutch with a surprise attack on the Americans. Why? Not oil. Yes, the Americans had stopped selling oil to Japan, cutting off 80% of their supply, but the Japanese could have countered the embargo in several ways.The book details the alternative paths Japan could have taken to obtain oil without getting into a war with the United States. Japan has been a polity for seventeen hundred years, Precedent counts for much. Getting to a good account for the Pearl attack requires a bit of background material. This includes a recapitulation of Japan's past, including relations with its neighbors. The real story behind the Pearl attack is deeply rooted in the history of Japan and East Asia. It is a result of the struggle to protect Japan's modern liberal democracy from foes both within and without. Pearl Harbor: The Missing Motive details the compelling logic that drove Yamamoto and others to this difficult choice. Bonus: This book's long term scope makes it a good background brief for today's Pacific hemisphere headlines, from Washington to Tokyo to Singapore.
Send the Alabamians recounts the story of the 167th Infantry Regiment of the WWI Rainbow Division from their recruitment to their valiant service on the bloody fields of eastern France in the climactic final months of World War I. To mark the centenary of World War I, Send the Alabamians tells the remarkable story of a division of Alabama recruits whose service Douglas MacArthur observed had not “ been surpassed in military history.” The book borrows its title from a quip by American General Edward H. Plummer who commanded the young men during the inauspicious early days of their service. Impressed with their ferocity and esprit de corps but exasperated by their rambunctiousness, Plummer reportedly exclaimed: In time of war, send me all the Alabamians you can get, but in time of peace, for Lord’ s sake, send them to somebody else! The ferocity of the Alabamians, so apt to get them in trouble at home, proved invaluable in the field. At the climactic Battle of Croix Rouge, the hot-blooded 167th exhibited unflinching valor and, in the face of machine guns, artillery shells, and poison gas, sustained casualty rates over 50 percent to dislodge and repel the deeply entrenched and heavily armed enemy. Relying on extensive primary sources such as journals, letters, and military reports, Frazer draws a vivid picture of the individual soldiers who served in this division, so often overlooked but critical to the war’ s success. After Gettysburg, the Battle of Croix Rouge is the most significant military engagement to involve Alabama soldiers in the state’ s history. Families and geneologists will value the full roster of the 167th that accompanies the text. Richly researched yet grippingly readable, Nimrod T. Frazer’ s Send the Alabamians will delight those interested in WWI, the World Wars, Alabama history, or southern military history in general. Historians of the war, regimental historians, military history aficionados, and those interested in previously unexplored facets of Alabama history will prize this unique volume as well.
Pierre Teilhard de Chardin SJ. 1 May 1881 – 10 April 1955 was a French philosopher and Jesuit priest who trained as a paleontologist and geologist and took part in the discovery of Peking Man.
"The greatest and most convincing writer of 'invented worlds' that I have read." — J. R. R. Tolkien. Written in the best traditions of Homeric epics, Eddison's masterpiece recounts compelling tales of warriors and witches.
Memoirs of the author, former chief of Indian Naval Staff.
"I have no wish to play the pontificating fool, pretending that I've suddenly come up with the answers to all life's questions. Quite the contrary, I began this book as an exploration, an exercise in selfquestioning. In other words, I wanted to find out, as I looked back at a long and complicated life, with many twists and turns, how well I've done at measuring up to the values I myself have set." In this luminous memoir, a true American icon looks back on his celebrated life and career. His body of work is arguably the most morally significant in cinematic history, and the power and influence of that work are indicative of the character of the man behind the many storied roles. Sidney Poitier here explores these elements of character and personal values to take his own measure--as a man, as a husband and father, and as an actor. Poitier credits his parents and his childhood on tiny Cat Island in the Bahamas for equipping him with the unflinching sense of right and wrong and of selfworth that he has never surrendered and that have dramatically shaped his world. "In the kind of place where I grew up," recalls Poitier, "what's coming at you is the sound of the sea and the smell of the wind and momma's voice and the voice of your dad and the craziness of your brothers and sisters ... and that's it." Without television, radio, and material distractions to obscure what matters most, he could enjoy the simple things, endure the long commitments, and find true meaning in his life. Poitier was uncompromising as he pursued a personal and public life that would honor his upbringing and the invaluable legacy of his parents just a few years after his introduction to indoor plumbing and the automobile, Poitier broke racial barrier after racial barrier to launch a pioneering acting career. Committed to the notion that what one does for a living articulates who one is, Poitier played only forceful and affecting characters who said something positive, useful, and lasting about the human condition. Here, finally, is Poitier's own introspective look at what has informed his performances and his life. Poitier explores the nature of sacrifice and commitment, pride and humility, rage and forgiveness, and paying the price for artistic integrity, What emerges is a picture of a man seeking truth, passion, and balance in the face of limits--his own and the world's. A triumph of the spirit, The Measure of a Man captures the essential Poitier.
During the Great War, many boys went straight from the classroom to the most dangerous job in the world - that of junior officer on the Western Front. Although desperately aware of how many of their predecessors had fallen before them, nearly all stepped forward, unflinchingly, to do their duty. The average life expectancy of a subaltern in the trenches was a mere six weeks. In this remarkable book, John Lewis-Stempel focuses on the forgotten men who truly won Britain's victory in the First World War - the subalterns, lieutenants and captains of the Army, the leaders in the trenches, the first 'over the top', the last to retreat. Basing his narrative on a huge range of first-person accounts, including the poignant letters and diaries sent home or to their old schools, the author reveals what motivated these boy-men to act in such an extraordinary, heroic way. He describes their brief, brilliant lives in and out of the trenches, the tireless ways they cared for their men, and how they tried to behave with honour in a world where their values and codes were quite literally being shot to pieces.

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