While the death of a parent is always painful, losing both is life-altering. When author Allison Gilbert lost both parents at age 32, she could not find any books that spoke to her with the same level of compassion and reassurance that she found in the support group she belonged to, so she decided to write one of her own. The result is a sensitive and candid portrayal of loss that brings together experiences from famous and ordinary grief-stricken sons and daughters that explores the regrets, heartache and sometimes, relief, that accompanies pain and healing. Always Too Soon provides a range of intimate conversations with those — famous and not — who have lost both parents, providing readers with a source of comfort and inspiration as they learn to negotiate their new place in the world. Contributors include Hope Edelman, Geraldine Ferraro, Dennis Franz, Barbara Ehrenreich, Yogi Berra, Rosanne Cash, and Ice-T, as well as those who lost parents to the Oklahoma City bombing, the World Trade Center bombings, drunk driving, and more.
Through observation and experience, Lewis Timberlake has discovered the dynamics of prevailing over failure. This book offers six steps to stand on when you are overwhelmed by difficulties and reveals the secrets of conquering defeatist attitudes. Timberlake also shows that people who seem to have all the "breaks" have actually made their own breaks through diligence and patience. Book jacket.
With over 4 million volumes in print and used worldwide, these timeless books have provided invaluable insight into the history, meaning, and context of virtually every book in the Bible. Revised with a new look and added content, these commentaries now include study questions at the end of each chapter for further reflection and application.
Do you want God’s best for your life? Do you want to feel special to Him? Do you want some answers in some very difficult situations? Do you want to hear how others have “walked on the water?” Do you want to “touch the hem of His garment?” Do you want to drink from the “well that never shall run dry?” Are you walking in the sunshine or the dark shadows of life? Whatever your circumstances might be, this book is for you. This book is for your daughter. This book is one that you and your husband could read together It is not about the author or her opinion, but the universal and not optional principles of God. It demonstrates living illustrations of the consequences of their application or the failure to employ them. You can laugh, you can cry, you can sympathize with those that wept, and you can learn to forgive. Life is on a moving walkway taking you steadily toward a door marked “death”. There are all sorts of varying circumstances en route. God says, “This is the Way, walk ye in it.” Often in the dark shadows of life, or even in the sunlight we ask “What is the Way?” The people in this book asked that question. They found the “Way.” Our God answered their cry, and they chose to follow His directions, even though it sometimes seemed against their common sense. You’ll find answers that can change your whole perspective on life. Those that took the challenge to pray a very simple short prayer “Lord, change me” are living examples of changed lives. The results were not dependent upon God changing the circumstances. They were willing for God to change them in their circumstances. If you’re reading this and you have an irregular person in your life, let me encourage you. That irregular person has hurts and they have walked into your life because God has trusted you to be a big part of their “healing.” Perhaps they have never heard that God loves them just the way they are, but He loves them too much to leave them that way. You can be a very strong link between them and God. You decide. “Do you want God’s best for your life.?”
When doctors told Art Buchwald that his kidneys were kaput, the renowned humorist declined dialysis and checked into a Washington, D.C., hospice to live out his final days. Months later, “The Man Who Wouldn’t Die” was still there, feeling good, holding court in a nonstop “salon” for his family and dozens of famous friends, and confronting things you usually don’t talk about before you die; he even jokes about them. Here Buchwald shares not only his remarkable experience–as dozens of old pals from Ethel Kennedy to John Glenn to the Queen of Swaziland join the party–but also his whole wonderful life: his first love, an early brush with death in a foxhole on Eniwetok Atoll, his fourteen champagne years in Paris, fame as a columnist syndicated in hundreds of newspapers, and his incarnation as hospice superstar. Buchwald also shares his sorrows: coping with an absent mother, childhood in a foster home, and separation from his wife, Ann. He plans his funeral (with a priest, a rabbi, and Billy Graham, to cover all the bases) and strategizes how to land a big obituary in The New York Times (“Make sure no head of state or Nobel Prize winner dies on the same day”). He describes how he and a few of his famous friends finagled cut-rate burial plots on Martha’s Vineyard and how he acquired a Picasso drawing without really trying. What we have here is a national treasure, the complete Buchwald, uncertain of where the next days or weeks may take him but unfazed by the inevitable, living life to the fullest, with frankness, dignity, and humor. “[Art Buchwald] has given his friends, their families, and his audiences so many laughs and so much joy through the years that that alone would be an enduring legacy. But Art has never been just about the quick laugh. His humor is a road map to essential truths and insights that might otherwise have eluded us.” –Tom Brokaw From the Hardcover edition.
This illustrated book describes how to forgive in a healthy way by moving through the five stages of forgiveness. This is a forgiveness that renounces vengeance and retaliation, but does not passively acquiesce to abuse in any form.
In a competition of the most hated memes of modern times, "Hipster" has now caught up with "Hitler." Artists James Carr and Archana Kumar thought, why not combine the two? After all, Hitler was indeed a hipster of his time, a failed artist in Vienna scrounging up extra dollars or kroner painting quick architecture scenes for the tourists. In their heavily trafficked website, "hipsterhitler.com," these comic artists posit a new sort of history in which Hitler, wears Silverlake-trendy glasses, thrift store sweaters, and outspoken T-shirts, and the reader begins to quickly understand the history of Hitler in a new and strangely engaging way. The Feral House book of Hipster Hitler includes a few dozen pages of comics heretofore unseen online.
A micro-preemie fights for survival in this extraordinary and gorgeously told memoir by her parents, both award-winning journalists. Juniper French was born four months early, at 23 weeks' gestation. She weighed 1 pound, 4 ounces, and her twiggy body was the length of a Barbie doll. Her head was smaller than a tennis ball, her skin was nearly translucent, and through her chest you could see her flickering heart. Babies like Juniper, born at the edge of viability, trigger the question: Which is the greater act of love -- to save her, or to let her go? Kelley and Thomas French chose to fight for Juniper's life, and this is their incredible tale. In one exquisite memoir, the authors explore the border between what is possible and what is right. They marvel at the science that conceived and sustained their daughter and the love that made the difference. They probe the bond between a mother and a baby, between a husband and a wife. They trace the journey of their family from its fragile beginning to the miraculous survival of their now thriving daughter.
Anna thinks it is too early to go to bed, but her grandfather leads her one step at a time.
What is happening to me? Why am I constantly terrified? Why are these strange and scary feelings plaguing me and robbing me of lifes joys? Why wont they go away? What is wrong? Why Lord? Why wont you rescue me? Jeanne Svobodny asked these questions during a very difficult time in her life. Jeanne had experienced what she describes as an idyllic life as a Christian wife, mother, daughter, teacher, and athlete until she unexpectedly experienced overwhelming fear. The physical sensations she repeatedly felt as a result of horrific fear including rapid heartbeats, nausea, dizziness, sweating, chills, and loud ringing in her ears were petrifying and shook her confidence to the core. In Its Too Soon to Quit, this determined woman describes her journey coping with an unexpected season in her life which was filled with dreadful panic attacks. By writing her story, Jeanne hopes the lessons she learned will bring hope to others who may be going through a similar season of suffering. Jeanne vulnerably shares her early experiences with extreme anxiety and her later diagnosis of panic disorder. Because of the severity of the attacks, she thought she was going crazy. Functioning through simple, routine daily tasks became extremely challenging for her. After many years of living with excruciating fear while searching for answers, relief finally arrived. Read about the amazing promises of God and His personal whispers which sustained Jeanne during this season of her life. Take heart and Run with perseverance, the race that is set before you (Hebrews 12:1-3) and Let the peace of God guard your hearts and minds (Colossians 3:15).
A collection of topical essays revealing the acclaimed writer at his wittiest deals with matters of the family, educational issues, world affairs, and language in short takes that offer a humorous look at the quirks of society. 25,000 first printing. Tour.
Ready to quit? You’re not the only one. Flip through the pages of Scripture— you’re in good company. Warren Wiersbe unfolds the stories of fifteen Bible characters who struggled just like you, and tells how you can gain the strength to survive—and thrive—when the road gets rocky.
Andrew, You Died Too Soon is the poignant, painfully honest reflection of a mother who lost a son to suicide, and the account of the family's journey through grief in the company of faith.
After service in Vietnam, as a surgeon for the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment in 1968-69, at the height of the war, Dr. Gordon Livingston returned to the U.S. and began work as a psychiatrist. In that capacity, he has listened to people talk about their lives-what works, what doesn't, and the limitless ways (many of them self-inflicted) that people find to be unhappy. He is also a parent twice bereaved; in one thirteen-month period, he lost his eldest son to suicide, his youngest to leukemia. Out of a lifetime of experience, Gordon Livingston has extracted thirty bedrock truths: We are what we do. Any relationship is under the control of the person who cares the least. The perfect is the enemy of the good. Only bad things happen quickly. Forgiveness is a form of letting go, but they are not the same thing. The statute of limitations has expired on most of our childhood traumas. Livingston illuminates these and twenty-four others in a series of carefully hewn, perfectly calibrated essays, many of which focus on our closest relationships and the things that we do to impede or, less frequently, enhance them. Again and again, these essays underscore that “we are what we do,” and that while there may be no escaping who we are, we have the capacity to face loss, misfortune, and regret and to move beyond them-that it is not too late. Full of things we may know but have not articulated to ourselves, Too Soon Old, Too Late Smart offers solace, guidance, and hope to everyone ready to become the person they'd most like to be.
Too High, Too Far, Too Soon is the humorous, tragic and searingly honest memoir of a man who survived childhood tragedy, Catholic boarding school and chronic drug addiction. Simon Mason graphically details his experience of teenage angst in a tatty seaside town before he ran away to London and then onwards to the crack-infested streets of LA. He recounts his numerous decadent adventures at Glastonbury Festival and the notoriety that came during his stint as personal chemist to the biggest bands of the '90s, before he himself descended into a helpless period of heroin addiction. After several incidents of petty crime stemming from his drug problem, Simon launched numerous failed attempts to become a bona fide rock 'n' roll star and even more failed attempts to get clean, finally being ‘rescued’ by Banksy from a stolen camper van, covered in blood in the Spanish countryside. Too High, Too Far, Too Soon is a rock 'n' roll memoir with a difference, written by a man who lived the life and attained the drug habits of the most extreme rock stars, yet whose attempts to break through to the big time always eluded him.
When a forty-seven-foot sailboat disappears in the Gulf Stream in the throes of a disastrous storm, it leaves behind three weary passengers struggling to stay alive. This middle-grade adaptation of an adult nonfiction book tells the story of the four intrepid Coast Guardsmen who braved this ruthless storm in the hopes of saving them. A spellbinding tale of courage and survival from the author of The Finest Hours, now a major motion picture.
The Dolls, peddling trans-gender posturing and incendiary rock 'n' roll, were dumped by the record business after making just two albums. But their influence lived on when Malcolm McLaren injected the last of The Dolls' life blood into the Sex Pistols and changed pop forever. From punk to grunge, practically every new sensation in contemporary rock has been a delayed reaction to The New York Dolls.Too Much Too Soon celebrates all the glorious sleaze and excess of the Dolls' brief auto-destruct career through interviews with the survivors, including band members, managers, roadies, groupies and hangers-on. The result is the ultimate saga of unrepentant rock 'n' roll and debauchery.This updated edition includes details of the band's reunion for Morrissey's Meltdown event in 2004, as well as the tragic death of Arthur Cane shortly afterwards.
Based on author David A. Grier's column "In Our Time," which runs monthly in Computer magazine, Too Soon To Tell presents a collection of essays skillfully written about the computer age, an era that began February 1946. Examining ideas that are both contemporary and timeless, these chronological essays examine the revolutionary nature of the computer, the relation between machines and human institutions, and the connections between fathers and sons to provide general readers with a picture of a specific technology that attempted to rebuild human institutions in its own image.
Kieron Dyer's memoir, Old Too Soon, Smart Too Late, is the first intimate and unsparing portrait of the failures and excesses of the generation of English footballers made rich beyond their wildest dreams by the post-1990 World Cup boom in the game and the explosion of the Premier League. It shares the same brutal honesty and self-awareness of the bestselling No Nonsense by Joey Barton and GoodFella by Craig Bellamy. In the public mind, Kieron Dyer came to symbolise so much of what was self-destructive about a group of football players known collectively as the 'Baby Bentley generation'. Nicknamed 'The King of Bling' by the tabloid press, Dyer was caught up in many of the scandals that characterised the history of a talented crop of players who promised so much and delivered so little, a generation whose wages and lavish lifestyles began to alienate them from the fans who once worshipped them. The brash young man is gone now, and in his place is the quiet, caring, wise man who was such a favourite on I'm a Celebrity, Get me Out of Here! in 2015. Dyer narrates, in uncompromising detail, how a generation of talented English footballers, taken out of working class childhoods and presented with a world of glitz, glamour, wealth and temptation, failed to cope with the riches that were presented to them and often fell apart. Old Too Soon, Smart Too Late is about a moment in time, a social and historical record of English football at the start of its gold rush. For Dyer, the end of the book brings a measure of personal redemption and peace but for the English game, there is only a lingering sense of waste and regret for an opportunity lost.

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