From the host of the Travel Channel’s “The Wild Within.” A hunt for the American buffalo—an adventurous, fascinating examination of an animal that has haunted the American imagination. In 2005, Steven Rinella won a lottery permit to hunt for a wild buffalo, or American bison, in the Alaskan wilderness. Despite the odds—there’s only a 2 percent chance of drawing the permit, and fewer than 20 percent of those hunters are successful—Rinella managed to kill a buffalo on a snow-covered mountainside and then raft the meat back to civilization while being trailed by grizzly bears and suffering from hypothermia. Throughout these adventures, Rinella found himself contemplating his own place among the 14,000 years’ worth of buffalo hunters in North America, as well as the buffalo’s place in the American experience. At the time of the Revolutionary War, North America was home to approximately 40 million buffalo, the largest herd of big mammals on the planet, but by the mid-1890s only a few hundred remained. Now that the buffalo is on the verge of a dramatic ecological recovery across the West, Americans are faced with the challenge of how, and if, we can dare to share our land with a beast that is the embodiment of the American wilderness. American Buffalo is a narrative tale of Rinella’s hunt. But beyond that, it is the story of the many ways in which the buffalo has shaped our national identity. Rinella takes us across the continent in search of the buffalo’s past, present, and future: to the Bering Land Bridge, where scientists search for buffalo bones amid artifacts of the New World’s earliest human inhabitants; to buffalo jumps where Native Americans once ran buffalo over cliffs by the thousands; to the Detroit Carbon works, a “bone charcoal” plant that made fortunes in the late 1800s by turning millions of tons of buffalo bones into bone meal, black dye, and fine china; and even to an abattoir turned fashion mecca in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District, where a depressed buffalo named Black Diamond met his fate after serving as the model for the American nickel. Rinella’s erudition and exuberance, combined with his gift for storytelling, make him the perfect guide for a book that combines outdoor adventure with a quirky blend of facts and observations about history, biology, and the natural world. Both a captivating narrative and a book of environmental and historical significance, American Buffalo tells us as much about ourselves as Americans as it does about the creature who perhaps best of all embodies the American ethos.
“Revelatory . . . With every chapter, you get a history lesson, a hunting lesson, a nature lesson and a cooking lesson. . . . Meat Eater offers an overabundance to savor.”—The New York Times Book Review Steven Rinella grew up in Twin Lake, Michigan, the son of a hunter who taught his three sons to love the natural world the way he did. As a child, Rinella devoured stories of the American wilderness, especially the exploits of his hero, Daniel Boone. He began fishing at the age of three and shot his first squirrel at eight and his first deer at thirteen. He chose the colleges he went to by their proximity to good hunting ground, and he experimented with living solely off wild meat. As an adult, he feeds his family from the food he hunts. Meat Eater chronicles Rinella’s lifelong relationship with nature and hunting through the lens of ten hunts, beginning when he was an aspiring mountain man at age ten and ending as a thirty-seven-year-old Brooklyn father who hunts in the remotest corners of North America. He tells of having a struggling career as a fur trapper just as fur prices were falling; of a dalliance with catch-and-release steelhead fishing; of canoeing in the Missouri Breaks in search of mule deer just as the Missouri River was freezing up one November; and of hunting the elusive Dall sheep in the glaciated mountains of Alaska. Through each story, Rinella grapples with themes such as the role of the hunter in shaping America, the vanishing frontier, the ethics of killing, the allure of hunting trophies, the responsibilities that human predators have to their prey, and the disappearance of the hunter himself as Americans lose their connection with the way their food finds its way to their tables. Hunting, he argues, is intimately connected with our humanity; assuming responsibility for acquiring the meat that we eat, rather than entrusting it to proxy executioners, processors, packagers, and distributors, is one of the most respectful and exhilarating things a meat eater can do. A thrilling storyteller with boundless interesting facts and historical information about the land, the natural world, and the history of hunting, Rinella also includes after each chapter a section of “Tasting Notes” that draws from his thirty-plus years of eating and cooking wild game, both at home and over a campfire. In Meat Eater he paints a loving portrait of a way of life that is part of who we are as humans and as Americans. Praise for Meat Eater “Full of empathy and intelligence . . . In some sections of the book, the author’s prose is so engrossing, so riveting, that it matches, punch for punch, the best sports writing.”—The Wall Street Journal “Steven Rinella is one of the best nature writers of the last decade. . . . This book was a page-turner.”—Tim Ferris “Rinella’s writing is unerringly smart, direct, and sharply detailed.”—The Boston Globe “A unique and valuable alternate view of where our food comes from.”—Anthony Bourdain
Ein Bullshit-Job ist eine Beschäftigungsform, die so völlig sinnlos, unnötig oder schädlich ist, dass selbst der Arbeitnehmer ihre Existenz nicht rechtfertigen kann. Es geht also gerade nicht um Jobs, die niemand machen will, sondern um solche, die eigentlich niemand braucht. Im Zuge des technischen Fortschritts sind zahlreiche Arbeitsplätze durch Maschinen ersetzt worden. Trotzdem ist die durchschnittliche Arbeitszeit nicht etwa gesunken, sondern auf durchschnittlich 41,5 Wochenstunden gestiegen. Wie konnte es dazu kommen? David Graeber zeigt in seinem bahnbrechenden neuen Buch, warum immer mehr überflüssige Jobs entstehen und welche verheerenden Konsequenzen diese Entwicklung für unsere Gesellschaft hat. Im Jahr 1930 sagte der britische Ökonom John Maynard Keynes voraus, dass durch den technischen Fortschritt heute niemand mehr als 15 Stunden pro Woche arbeiten müsse. Fast ein Jahrhundert danach stellt David Graeber fest, dass die Gegenwart anders aussieht: Die durchschnittliche Arbeitszeit ist gestiegen und immer mehr Menschen üben Tätigkeiten aus, die unproduktiv und daher eigentlich überflüssig sind – als Immobilienmakler, Investmentbanker oder Unternehmensberater. Es sind Jobs, die keinen sinnvollen gesellschaftlichen Beitrag leisten. Es sind Bullshit-Jobs. Warum bezahlt eine Ökonomie solche Tätigkeiten, die sie nicht braucht? Wie ist es zu dieser Entwicklung gekommen? Und was können wir dagegen tun? David Graeber, einer der radikalsten politischen Denker unserer Zeit, geht diesem Phänomen auf den Grund. Ein packendes Plädoyer gegen die Ausweitung sinnloser Arbeit, die die moralischen Grundfesten unserer Gesellschaft ins Wanken bringt.
A comprehensive big-game hunting guide for hunters ranging from first-time novices to seasoned experts, with more than 400 full-color photographs, including work by renowned outdoor photographer John Hafner Steven Rinella was raised in a hunting family and has been pursuing wild game his entire life. In this first-ever complete guide to hunting—from hunting an animal to butchering and cooking it—the host of the popular hunting show MeatEater shares his own expertise with us, and imparts strategies and tactics from many of the most experienced hunters in the United States as well. This invaluable book includes • recommendations on what equipment you will need—and what you can do without—from clothing to cutlery to camping gear to weapons • basic and advanced hunting strategies, including spot-and-stalk hunting, ambush hunting, still hunting, drive hunting, and backpack hunting • how to effectively use decoys and calling for big game • how to find hunting locations, on both public and private land, and how to locate areas that other hunters aren’t using • how and when to scout hunting locations for maximum effectiveness • basic information on procuring hunting tags, including limited-entry “draw” tags • a species-by-species description of fourteen big-game animals, from their mating rituals and preferred habitats to the best hunting techniques—both firearm and archery—for each species • how to plan and pack for backcountry hunts • instructions on how to break down any big-game animal and transport it from your hunting site • how to butcher your own big-game animals and select the proper cuts for sausages, roasts, and steaks, and how to utilize underappreciated cuts such as ribs and shanks • cooking techniques and recipes, for both outdoor and indoor preparation of wild game
Moskau: Ein vierjähriger Junge erwacht in einer kalten leeren Wohnung. Er wartet auf den Onkel, doch der kommt nicht nach Hause. Auch seine Mutter nicht, deren Ermahnungen er im Ohr hat. Der Junge hat Angst vor dem Onkel, der ihm verboten hat, sein Zimmer zu verlassen. Doch er ist hungrig, faßt Mut und verläßt die Wohnung. Der Junge, Romochka, ist allein. Es schneit, die Menschen beachten ihn nicht, nur ein Hund nähert sich ihm, aggressiv, dann neugierig. Romochka folgt dem Hund, und der Hund – die Hündin – gestattet ihm zu folgen. Hin zu ihrer Höhle in einem verlassenen Gebäude. Zu seiner neuen Familie. Romochkas Leben als Hund beginnt. „Dog Boy befasst sich intensiv mit der Frage, was das Menschsein ausmacht, wie wir zu Menschen werden und wie wir es schaffen, an unserer Menschlichkeit, wenn wir sie einmal besitzen, festzuhalten.“ Donna Leon
Durch die unberührte Wildnis streifen, der Beute auf der Spur – die Jagd fasziniert seit Urzeiten und führt heute zu einer Ursprünglichkeit zurück, nach der wir uns umso dringlicher sehnen, je mehr wir sie in unserem Alltag verlieren. Das Einssein mit der Natur, der Wunsch nach einer direkten Beziehung zum eigenen Essen und das Abenteuer sind nur einige Motive, die immer mehr Jäger in den Wald locken. Anhand von zehn spannenden und außergewöhnlichen Jagdabenteuern beschreibt der passionierte Jäger Steven Rinella seine Entwicklung vom zehnjährigen Naturburschen zum Großstadtvater, der seine Familie von der Jagd ernährt. Dabei thematisiert er die Hintergründe der Jagd, ethische Gesichtspunkte des Tötens, den Reiz von Jagdtrophäen, die Verantwortung, die der menschliche Räuber seiner Beute gegenüber besitzt, und die Herabsetzung des Jägers in der Gesellschaft, seit den Menschen die Verbindung zur Herkunft ihrer Nahrung zunehmend verloren ging.
From the host of the television series and podcast MeatEater, the long-awaited definitive guide to cooking wild game, including fish and fowl, featuring more than 100 new recipes “As a MeatEater fan who loves to cook, I can tell you that this book is a must-have.”—Andrew Zimmern When Steven Rinella hears from fans of his MeatEater show and podcast, it’s often requests for more recipes. One of the most respected and beloved hunters in America, Rinella is also an accomplished wild game cook, and he offers recipes here that range from his takes on favorite staples to more surprising and exotic meals. Big Game: Techniques and strategies for butchering and cooking all big game, from whitetail deer to moose, wild hogs, and black bear, and recipes for everything from shanks to tongue. Small Game: How to prepare appetizers and main courses using common small game species such as squirrels and rabbits as well as lesser-known culinary treats like muskrat and beaver. Waterfowl: How to make the most of available waterfowl, ranging from favorites like mallards and wood ducks to more challenging birds, such as wild geese and diving ducks. Upland Birds: A wide variety of butchering methods for all upland birds, plus recipes, including Thanksgiving wild turkey, grilled grouse, and a fresh take on jalapeño poppers made with mourning dove. Freshwater Fish: Best practices for cleaning and cooking virtually all varieties of freshwater fish, including trout, bass, catfish, walleye, suckers, northern pike, eels, carp, and salmon. Saltwater Fish: Handling methods and recipes for common and not-so-common species of saltwater fish encountered by anglers everywhere, from Maine to the Bahamas, and from Southern California to northern British Columbia. Everything else: How to prepare great meals from wild clams, crabs, crayfish, mussels, snapping turtles, bullfrogs, and even sea cucumbers and alligators. Whether you’re cooking outdoors or in the kitchen, at the campfire or on the grill, this cookbook will be an indispensable guide for both novices and expert chefs. “Rinella goes to the next level and offers some real deal culinary know-how to make sure that your friends and family will dig what you put on the table.”—Guy Fieri “[A] must-read cookbook for those seeking a taste of the wild.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)
Unser Trauma: eine Gesellschaft ohne Gemeinschaft. »Entbehrungen machen dem Menschen nichts aus, er ist sogar auf sie angewiesen; worunter er jedoch leidet, ist das Gefühl, nicht gebraucht zu werden. Die moderne Gesellschaft hat die Kunst perfektioniert, Menschen das Gefühl der Nutzlosigkeit zu geben. Es ist an der Zeit, dem ein Ende zu setzen.« Sebastian Junger Warum beschließen Soldaten nach ihrer Rückkehr aus dem Krieg und in die Heimat, sich zu neuen Einsätzen zu melden? Warum sind Belastungsstörungen und Depressionen in unserer modernen Gesellschaft so virulent? Warum erinnern sich Menschen oft sehnsüchtiger an Katastrophenerfahrungen als an Hochzeiten oder Karibikurlaube? Mit Tribe hat Sebastian Junger eines der meistdiskutierten Werke des Jahres vorgelegt. Er erklärt, was wir von Stammeskulturen über Loyalität, Gemeinschaftsgefühl und die ewige Suche des Menschen nach Sinn lernen können.
"Ich spreche Spanisch zu Gott, Italienisch zu den Frauen, Französisch zu den Männern und Deutsch zu meinem Pferd.' Die scherzhafte Vermutung Karls V., dass verschiedene Sprachen nicht in allen Situationen gleich gut zu gebrauchen sind, findet wohl auch heute noch breite Zustimmung. Doch ist sie aus sprachwissenschaftlicher Sicht haltbar? Sind alle Sprachen gleich komplex, oder ist Sprache ein Spiegel ihrer kulturellen Umgebung - sprechen 'primitive' Völker 'primitive' Sprachen? Und inwieweit sieht die Welt, wenn sie 'durch die Brille' einer anderen Sprache gesehen wird, anders aus? Das neue Buch des renommierten Linguisten Guy Deutscher ist eine sagenhafte Tour durch Länder, Zeiten und Sprachen. Auf seiner Reise zu den aktuellsten Ergebnissen der Sprachforschung geht Guy Deutscher mit Captain Cook auf Känguruh-Jagd, prüft mit William Gladstone die vermeintliche Farbblindheit der Griechen zur Zeit Homers und verfolgt Rudolf Virchow in Carl Hagenbecks Zoo auf dem Kurfürstendamm im Berlin des 19. Jahrhunderts. Mitreisende werden nicht nur mit einer glänzend unterhaltsamen Übersicht der Sprachforschung, mit humorvollen Highlights, unerwarteten Wendungen und klugen Antworten belohnt. Sie vermeiden auch einen Kardinalfehler, dem Philologen, Anthropologen und - wer hätte das gedacht - auch Naturwissenschaftler allzu lange aufgesessen sind: die Macht der Kultur zu unterschätzen." -- Publisher's website.
»Ich erinnere mich, daß ich in einer amerikanischen ›Pferdebahn‹ saß, als ich plötzlich merkte, wie ich voller Enthusiasmus die Situation eines robusten, aber hinterhältig betrogenen und verratenen, eines grausam gekränkten Landsmannes in einem fremden Lande und in einer aristokratischen Gesellschaft als Thema einer Erzählung erwog; dabei kam es insbesondere darauf an, daß er durch diejenigen Personen leiden müßte, die vorgaben, die höchstmögliche Kultur zu repräsentieren und einem ihm in jeder Weise überlegenen Rang anzugehören. Was würde er in jener Zwangslage ›tun‹, wie würde er sich Recht verschaffen, oder wie würde er, falls keine Abhilfe möglich war, sich angesichts dieses ihm zugefügten Unrechtes benehmen?«Henry James
He was complex, quirky, pugnacious, and difficult. He seemed to create enemies wherever he went, even among his friends. A fireplug of a man who stood only five feet eight inches in his stocking feet, he had an outsized ambition to make his mark on the world. And he did. William Temple Hornaday (1854-1937) was probably the most famous conservationist of the nineteenth century, second only to his great friend and ally Theodore Roosevelt. Hornaday's great passion was protecting wild things and wild places, and he spent most of his adult life in a state of war on their behalf, as a taxidermist and museum collector; as the founder and first director of the National Zoo in Washington, DC; as director of the Bronx Zoo for thirty years; and as the author of nearly two dozen books on conservation and wildlife. But in Mr. Hornaday's War, the long-overdue biography of Hornaday by journalist Stefan Bechtel, the grinding contradictions of Hornaday's life also become clear. Though he is credited with saving the American bison from extinction, he began his career as a rifleman and trophy hunter who led "the last buffalo hunt" into the Montana Territory. And what happened in 1906 at the Bronx Zoo, when Hornaday displayed an African man in a cage, shows a side of him that is as baffling as it is repellent. This gripping new book takes an honest look at a fascinating and enigmatic man.
Winner of the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for History Encounters at the Heart of the World concerns the Mandan Indians, iconic Plains people whose teeming, busy towns on the upper Missouri River were for centuries at the center of the North American universe. We know of them mostly because Lewis and Clark spent the winter of 1804-1805 with them, but why don't we know more? Who were they really? In this extraordinary book, Elizabeth A. Fenn retrieves their history by piecing together important new discoveries in archaeology, anthropology, geology, climatology, epidemiology, and nutritional science. Her boldly original interpretation of these diverse research findings offers us a new perspective on early American history, a new interpretation of the American past. By 1500, more than twelve thousand Mandans were established on the northern Plains, and their commercial prowess, agricultural skills, and reputation for hospitality became famous. Recent archaeological discoveries show how these Native American people thrived, and then how they collapsed. The damage wrought by imported diseases like smallpox and the havoc caused by the arrival of horses and steamboats were tragic for the Mandans, yet, as Fenn makes clear, their sense of themselves as a people with distinctive traditions endured. A riveting account of Mandan history, landscapes, and people, Fenn's narrative is enriched and enlivened not only by science and research but by her own encounters at the heart of the world.
An essential tool for assisting leisure readers interested in topics surrounding food, this unique book contains annotations and read-alikes for hundreds of nonfiction titles about the joys of comestibles and cooking.
Wenn der schwarze König fällt ... Als der geachtete Richter Oliver Garland überraschend stirbt, ist sein Sohn Talcott überzeugt, dass ein schwaches Herz die Ursache war. Doch warum wird Talcott ständig nach den «Vorkehrungen» gefragt, die sein Vater für den Todesfall getroffen habe? Warum wird er verfolgt? Und warum fehlen zwei Schachfiguren auf dem sonst so sorgsam gehüteten Schachbrett des Richters? Bald darauf wird ein zweiter Toter aus dem Umfeld Oliver Garlands aufgefunden. Und Talcott sieht sich hineingezogen in die dunkle Vergangenheit seines Vaters. Er muss alles aufs Spiel setzen: seine Ehre, seinen Ruf – und sein Leben. «Seit Tom Wolfe habe ich keinen so vielschichtigen, mitreißenden und bereichernden Roman gelesen wie ‹Schachmatt›.» (USA Today) «Ein prall erzähltes, anekdoten- und facettenreiches Werk.» (Der Spiegel) «Dieses Buch kann man einfach nicht aus der Hand legen.» (New York Times Book Review) «Wunderbar erzählt und clever konstruiert. ‹Schachmatt› ist eine lebendige und vielschichtige Familiensaga, die geschickt verbunden ist mit der Spannung eines Thrillers ... Ein wirklicher Genuss!» (John Grisham) «Man kann dieses Buch einfach nicht aus der Hand legen ... Ein ebenso außergewöhnlicher wie überzeugender Roman.» (New York Times) «Ein unterhaltsamer, eleganter und ideenreicher Roman mit einem wunderbaren Kosmos von Figuren.» (The New York Review of Books) «Scharfsichtige Beobachtungen, gepaart mit einem ernsthaften sozialen Gewissen, das den meisten Büchern dieser Art fehlt ... Ein sprachliches Meisterwerk.» (Time)
Von den Bergen Idahos nach Cambridge – der unwahrscheinliche »Bildungsweg« der Tara Westover. Tara Westover ist 17 Jahre alt, als sie zum ersten Mal eine Schulklasse betritt. Zehn Jahre später kann sie eine beeindruckende akademische Laufbahn vorweisen. Aufgewachsen im ländlichen Amerika, befreit sie sich aus einer ärmlichen, archaischen und von Paranoia und Gewalt geprägten Welt durch – Bildung, durch die Aneignung von Wissen, das ihr so lange vorenthalten worden war. Die Berge Idahos sind Taras Heimat, sie lebt als Kind im Einklang mit der grandiosen Natur, mit dem Wechsel der Jahreszeiten – und mit den Gesetzen, die ihr Vater aufstellt. Er ist ein fundamentalistischer Mormone, vom baldigen Ende der Welt überzeugt und voller Misstrauen gegenüber dem Staat, von dem er sich verfolgt sieht. Tara und ihre Geschwister gehen nicht zur Schule, sie haben keine Geburtsurkunden, und ein Arzt wird selbst bei fürchterlichsten Verletzungen nicht gerufen. Und die kommen häufig vor, denn die Kinder müssen bei der schweren Arbeit auf Vaters Schrottplatz helfen, um über die Runden zu kommen. Taras Mutter, die einzige Hebamme in der Gegend, heilt die Wunden mit ihren Kräutern. Nichts ist dieser Welt ferner als Bildung. Und doch findet Tara die Kraft, sich auf die Aufnahmeprüfung fürs College vorzubereiten, auch wenn sie quasi bei null anfangen muss ... Wie Tara Westover sich aus dieser Welt befreit, überhaupt erst einmal ein Bewusstsein von sich selbst entwickelt, um den schmerzhaften Abnabelungsprozess von ihrer Familie bewältigen zu können, das beschreibt sie in diesem ergreifenden und wunderbar poetischen Buch. » Befreit wirft ein Licht auf einen Teil unseres Landes, den wir zu oft übersehen. Tara Westovers eindringliche Erzählung — davon, einen Platz für sich selbst in der Welt zu finden, ohne die Verbindung zu ihrer Familie und ihrer geliebten Heimat zu verlieren — verdient es, weithin gelesen zu werden.« J.D. Vance Autor der »Hillbilly-Elegie«

Best Books