Essays discuss the history and practices of American journalism, covering such topics as ethics, sensationalism, women in journalism, and new technologies.
In a rapidly changing media landscape, what becomes of journalism? Designed to engage, inspire and challenge students while laying out the fundamental principles of the craft, Principles of American Journalism introduces students to the core values of journalism and its singularly important role in a democracy. From the First Amendment to Facebook, Stephanie Craft and Charles N. Davis provide a comprehensive exploration of the guiding principles of journalism—the ethical and legal foundations of the profession, its historical and modern precepts, the economic landscape, the relationships among journalism and other social institutions, and the key issues and challenges that contemporary journalists face. Case studies, discussion questions and field exercises help students to think critically about journalism’s function in society, creating mindful practitioners of journalism and more informed media consumers. With its bottom line under assault, its values being challenged from without and from within and its future anything but certain, it has never been more important to think about what’s unique about journalism. This text is ideal for use in introductory Principles of Journalism courses, and the companion website provides a full complement of student and instructor resources to enhance the learning experience and connect to the latest news issues and events.
For journalism to survive and flourish, it needs journalists who understand its importance to society, believe in and are committed to its core values, and can put those values into action. This goal is at the heart of Living Journalism, a highly readable, practical book where readers will learn the core values and principles needed to produce work that informs and enlightens an increasingly mobile and participatory audience. The advice and stories of professionals throughout the book allow veteran reporters to serve as mentors to today's journalists.
The authors outline the main principles of journalism, discussing the ethical and professional issues affecting the work of newspeople, the forces shaping the profession, and the future of journalism. 50,000 first printing.
Long-time peace journalist Steven Youngblood presents the foundations of peace journalism in this exciting new textbook, offering readers the methods, approaches, and concepts required to use journalism as a tool for peace, reconciliation, and development. Guidance is offered on framing stories, ethical treatment of sensitive subjects, and avoiding polarizing stereotypes through a range of international examples and case studies spanning from the Iraq war to the recent unrest in Ferguson, Missouri. Youngblood teaches students to interrogate traditional media narratives about crime, race, politics, immigration, and civil unrest, and to illustrate where—and how—a peace journalism approach can lead to more responsible and constructive coverage, and even assist in the peace process itself.
This book examines the significant changes in journalism that occurred after the mid-1960s, discussing how those changes contributed to the expanding reach of news, broadening definitions of news media, and diminishing trust in journalists.
"This is a volume of history validating the contributions of radio toward keeping America informed, and surveying radio's diminished effects in the wake of television in the 1950s. The U.S. was dependent on radio as a source of entertainment during the Great Depression and information gained from it during the Second World War had no parallel"--Provided by publisher.
Journalism, Ethics and Society provides a comprehensive overview and critical analysis of debates within media ethics in relation to the purpose of news and journalism for society. It assesses how the meaning of news and journalism is central to a discourse in ethics and further evaluates the continuing role of liberalism in helping to define both theory and practice. Its timely and topical analysis focuses on two of the most central concepts within media ethics and journalistic practice: the US based Public Journalism 'movement' and European Union media policies. It provides new ways of thinking about media ethics and will be of interest to students and researchers working within the field of media, cultural studies and journalism, as well as scholars of philosophy.
How Journalism Uses History examines the various ways in which journalism uses history and historical sources in order to better understand the relationships between journalists, historians and journalism scholars. It highlights the ambiguous overlap between the role of the historian and that of the journalist, and underlines that there no longer seems to be reason to accept that one begins only where the other ends. With Journalism Studies as a developing subject area throughout the world, journalism history is becoming a particularly vivacious field. As such, How Journalism Uses History argues that, if historical study of this kind is to achieve its full potential, there needs to be a fuller and more consistent engagement with other academics studying the past: political, social and cultural historians in particular, but also scholars working in politics, sociology, literature and linguistics. Contributors in this book discuss the core themes which inform history’s relationship with journalism from a wide range of geographical and methodological perspectives. They aim to create more ambitious conversations about using journalism both as a source for understanding the past, and for clarifying ideas about its role as constituent of the public sphere in using discourse and tradition to connect contemporary audiences with history. This book was originally published as a special issue of Journalism Practice.
"Herbert J. Gans is the Robert S. Lynd Professor of Sociology at Columbia University." --Book Jacket.
A study of the interaction of word and image in the creative work of the Harlem Renaissance.
Get 12 months FREE access to an interactive eBook* when you buy the paperback! (Print paperback version only, ISBN 9781446274095) To find out more and for a preview of the new edition visit https://study.sagepub.com/journalism Journalism: Principles & Practice remains the essential textbook for all students of journalism. With each print copy of the new third edition, you receive FREE access to the interactive eBook edition offering on-the-go access to a wealth of digital resources including video tutorials from the author. This book is the must-have guide to everything you need to know about how journalism works. The new edition is fully updated to cover the new essentials: social media, the impact of Twitter, and the need for an ethical approach. This book will equip you with all the skills and savvy you need to become the resourceful yet ethical journalists of the future. New and improved features will help you: Get to grips with the huge impact of social and mobile media on how we gather information and tell stories Grasp the rights and wrongs of journalism with a new chapter on ethics and regulation Learn how to make the most of your skills with tips from journalists such as Cathy Newman and Andrew Norfolk Think through ‘what would you do?' in a new feature that takes you into the real world of journalism at the end of every chapter This new edition retains its innovative two-column structure, stylishly blending theory and practice. As relevant to the newsroom as the seminar room, it is the one book you will need to take you through your degree and into your career as a journalist. *interactivity only available through Vitalsource eBook
The Year that Defined American Journalism explores the succession of remarkable and decisive moments in American journalism during 1897 – a year of significant transition that helped redefine the profession and shape its modern contours. This defining year featured a momentous clash of paradigms pitting the activism of William Randolph Hearst's participatory 'journalism of action' against the detached, fact-based antithesis of activist journalism, as represented by Adolph Ochs of the New York Times, and an eccentric experiment in literary journalism pursued by Lincoln Steffens at the New York Commercial-Advertiser. Resolution of the three-sided clash of paradigms would take years and result ultimately in the ascendancy of the Times' counter-activist model, which remains the defining standard for mainstream American journalism. The Year That Defined American Journalism introduces the year-study methodology to mass communications research and enriches our understanding of a pivotal moment in media history.
Handbook of the research methods used to study the history of mass communication.
Since September 11, Arab and American journalists have been trading barbs, accusing each other of bias and a lack of objectivity. But is news coverage in Arab countries all that different from American coverage? The Making of Arab News draws comparisons, including examples of Arabic news language and their English translations, to show how Arab news values have been Americanized and how these values are reflected in the language used in the Arab news. Visit our website for sample chapters!
The rapid growth of online media has led to new complications in journalism ethics and practice. While traditional ethical principles may not fundamentally change when information is disseminated online, applying them across platforms has become more challenging as new kinds of interactions develop between journalists and audiences. In Ethics for Digital Journalists, Lawrie Zion and David Craig draw together the international expertise and experience of journalists and scholars who have all been part of the process of shaping best practices in digital journalism. Drawing on contemporary events and controversies like the Boston Marathon bombing and the Arab Spring, the authors examine emerging best practices in everything from transparency and verification to aggregation, collaboration, live blogging, tweeting and the challenges of digital narratives. At a time when questions of ethics and practice are challenged and subject to intense debate, this book is designed to provide students and practitioners with the insights and skills to realize their potential as professionals.
"A compilation of essays that show how good journalistic practices enrich the daily lives of citizens, trace the development of free expression through American history, and enable citizens to play their own roles in the democracy, while also showing howthese principles are playing a revolutionary role in emerging democracies"--Provided by publisher.
Provides historical coverage of the United States and Canada from prehistory to the present. Includes information abstracted from over 2,000 journals published worldwide.
Current events and history both show that independent, self-appointed, and often caustic and partisan critics of the corporate press are essential to the functioning of American democracy.

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