By offering both a comprehensive update and new material reflecting the continuing development of the subject, this continues to be the leading textbook on international criminal law. Its experienced author team draws on its combined expertise as teachers, scholars and practitioners to offer an authoritative survey of the field. The third edition contains new material on the theory of international criminal law, the practice of international criminal tribunals, the developing case law on principles of liability and procedures and new practice on immunities. It offers valuable supporting online materials such as case studies, worked examples and study guides. Retaining its comprehensive coverage, clarity and critical analysis, it remains essential reading for all in the field.
This market-leading textbook gives an authoritative account of international criminal law, and focuses on what the student needs to know - the crimes that are dealt with by international courts and tribunals as well as the procedures that police the investigation and prosecution of those crimes. The reader is guided through controversies with an accessible, yet sophisticated approach by the author team of four international lawyers, with experience both of teaching the subject, and as negotiators at the foundation of the International Criminal Court and the Rome conference. It is an invaluable introduction for all students of international criminal law and international relations, and now covers developments in the ICC, victims' rights, and alternatives to international criminal justice, as well as including extended coverage of terrorism. Short, well chosen excerpts allow students to familiarise themselves with primary material from a wide range of sources. An extensive package of online resources is also available.
This market-leading textbook gives an authoritative account of international criminal law, and the investigation and prosecution of crime, and guides the reader through controversies with an accessible and sophisticated approach. Now covers developments in the ICC, victims' rights, alternatives to international criminal justice, and has extended coverage of terrorism.
National borders are permeable to all types of illicit action and contraband goods, whether it is trafficking humans, body parts, digital information, drugs, weapons, or money. Whilst criminals exist in a borderless world where territorial boundaries allow them to manipulate different markets in illicit goods, the authorities who pursue them can remain constrained inside their own jurisdictions. In a new edition of his ground-breaking work, Boister examines how states must cooperate to tackle some of the greatest security threats in this century so far, analyses to what extent vested interests have determined the course of global policy and law enforcement, and illustrates how responding to transnational crime itself becomes a form of international relations which reorders global political power and becomes, at least in part, an end in itself. Arguing that transnational criminal law is currently geared towards suppressing criminal activity, but is not as committed to ensuring justice, Boister suggests that it might be more strongly influenced by individual moral panics and a desire for criminal retribution than an interest in ensuring a proportional response to offences, protection of human rights, and the preservation of the rule of law.
The International Criminal Court has ushered in a new era in the protection of human rights. Protecting against genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, the Court acts when national justice systems are unwilling or unable to do so. Written by the leading expert in the field, the fourth edition of this seminal text considers the Court in action: its initial rulings, cases it has prosecuted and cases where it has decided not to proceed, such as Iraq. It also examines the results of the Review Conference, by which the crime of aggression was added to the jurisdiction of the Court and addresses the political context, such as the warming of the United States to the Court and the increasing recognition of the inevitability of the institution.
Revised edition of: International criminal law, second edition, 2008.
This major reference work identifies and crystallizes the common rules and principles underlying international criminal procedure, as developed by international courts and tribunals since the Second World War. It covers the whole of the international criminal process, from initial investigations to the role of victims and the final appeal.
'International Criminal Procedure, edited by two insiders to international criminal proceedings, Professor Linda Carter and Professor Fausto Pocar, a judge at the ICTY and a former President of this Tribunal, is a coherently organized, well-researched, very informative and not the least elegantly-written contribution to a young and rapidly developing legal sub-discipline. The book provides its reader with a highly accessible and up-to date introduction into key elements of international criminal procedure as well as with critical commentary and rich inspiration for improvements of current practices.' – Claus Kreß LL.M. (Cantab.), University of Cologne, Germany and Institute for International Peace and Security Law 'This book addresses compelling issues that have come before international criminal tribunals. They include the self-representation of accused persons, plea bargaining and victim participation. It usefully approaches all of the issues and problems from a comparative law perspective. This excellent and accessible work is essential reading for practitioners, faculty and students of international criminal law.' – Richard Goldstone, Retired Justice of the Constitutional Court of South Africa and for Chief Prosecutor of the United Nations International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda The emergence of international criminal courts, beginning with the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and including the International Criminal Court, has also brought an evolving international criminal procedure. In this book, the authors examine selected issues that reflect a blending of, or choice between, civil law and common law models of procedure. The issues include background on civil law and common law legal systems; plea bargaining; witness proofing; written and oral evidence; self-representation and the use of assigned, standby, and amicus counsel; the role of victims; and the right to appeal. International Criminal Procedure will appeal to academics, students, researchers, lawyers and judges working in the field of international criminal law.
The book presents a critical assessment on the use of human rights case law by international criminal tribunals. Based on the inadequacies highlighted though this analysis, the book propounds a coherent method to transfer human rights standards into international criminal justice.
International Criminal Law in Context provides a critical and contextual introduction to the fundamentals of international criminal law. It goes beyond a doctrinal analysis focused on the practice of international tribunals to draw on a variety of perspectives, capturing the complex processes of internationalisation that criminal law has experienced over the past few decades. The book considers international criminal law in context and seeks to account for the political and cultural factors that have influenced – and that continue to influence – this still-emerging body of law. Considering the substance, procedures, objectives, justifications and impacts of international criminal law, it addresses such topics as: • the history of international criminal law; • the subjects of international criminal law; • transitional justice and international criminal justice; • genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and the crime of aggression; • sexual and gender-based crimes; • international and hybrid criminal tribunals; • sentencing under international criminal law; and • the role of victims in international criminal procedure. The book will appeal to those who want to study international criminal law in a critical and contextualised way. Presenting original research, it will also be of interest to scholars and practitioners already familiar with the main legal and policy issues relating to this body of law.
This title covers the history, nature, and sources of international criminal law; the ratione personae; ratione materiae - sources of substantive international criminal law; the indirect enforcement system; the direct enforcement system; and much more.
Now newly updated and expanded, the Second Edition of this popular book provides a concise, realistic, hands-on guide to the fascinating and rewarding practice of criminal law. CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE FOR THE PARALEGAL offers a highly practical introduction to the field, exploring essential legal principles and their applications through a series of real-world cases, including prosecution, defense, and appellate processes. Drawing on his extensive experience as a criminal defense attorney, an assistant district attorney, and a college instructor, the author brings the world of prosecutors, defense attorneys, and paralegals to life with a uniquely engaging, reader-friendly style ideal for today's learners. The book also addresses relevant Supreme Court decisions and their ramifications and offers insights from actual paralegals and examples from real cases. This trusted text is an ideal resource to prepare you for success in the dynamic, high-demand field of criminal law. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE, 7th edition delivers extensive coverage of every aspect of the law and details the duties a paralegal is expected to perform when working within criminal law. High-level, comprehensive coverage is combined with cutting-edge developments, foundational concepts, and emerging trends, such as terrorism, treason, and national security crimes; cyber stalking; virtual child pornography; corporate crime, racial profiling, and more. Case excerpts help you develop your case analysis skills, while a variety of built-in learning aids sharpen your problem solving and analytical skills. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
This unique textbook provides an accessible introduction to a fascinating subject area. Written with student needs at its heart, innovative features such as 'Counterpoint' and 'Pause for reflection' boxes highlight current debates and areas worthy of more detailed analysis, providing students with the tools they need to develop their knowledge and start thinking critically about the law. Learning outcomes open each chapter, and are complemented by closing summaries to further support student understanding. Structured in four parts, the book first sets out the key international law principles which assume special significance in relation to international criminal law before going on to consider international criminal tribunals, the prosecution of international crimes, and the 'core' international crimes which have been prosecuted to date. Finally, consideration is given to issues such as legal defences and immunities under international law. Written by an outstanding scholar and teacher, this user-friendly text offers a unique approach to the subject area, making it the ideal choice for those new to the subject area. Online Resource Centre This book is accompanied by a free Online Resource Centre hosting links to key international law documents, additional material on the victims of crime, and updates on important developments within the subject area.
International Criminal Procedure: Principles and Rules is a comprehensive study of international criminal proceedings written by over forty leading experts in the field. The book offers a systematic overview and detailed comparison of the standards governing the conduct of proceedings in all major international and internationalized criminal courts from the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals to the recently established Cambodian Extraordinary Chambers and the Special Tribunal for Lebanon. Based on a major research project, the study covers all procedural phases from the initiation of investigation to the appeals process. It pays special attention to the crosscutting themes which shape the contemporary discourse on international criminal justice, including the law of evidence, the defence issues, the procedural role of victims, and negotiated dismissal of international crime cases. The book not only takes stock of the procedural legacy of the UN ad hoc Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda and the International Criminal Court, but also reflects on the future directions of international criminal procedure. Investigating the tribunals' procedural law and practice through the prism of human rights law, domestic legal traditions, and tribunals' special objectives, the expert group puts forth proposals on how the challenges facing international criminal jurisdictions can best be met. International Criminal Procedure will be an indispensable work for practitioners involved in the adjudication of serious crimes on both national and international level, as well as international law students and academics.
CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURES, 1/e bridges the gap between theoretical presentations of criminal law and procedure and the practical realities of working in the criminal justice field. It covers the essential principles, doctrines, and rules of criminal law and procedure, carefully balancing them with numerous “In the Field” special features offering insights drawn from real-world experiences. Students will find many examples and assignments drawn from both federal and state criminal cases, as well as many features and scenarios illuminating ethical standards for criminal justice professionals. Throughout, the text provides maximum flexibility to instructors teaching a wide range of pre-law, paralegal, and criminal justice students.
This book aims to honour the work of Professor Mirjan Damaška, Sterling Professor of Law at Yale Law School and a prominent authority for many years in the fields of comparative law, procedural law, evidence, international criminal law and Continental legal history. Professor Damaška 's work is renowned for providing new frameworks for understanding different legal traditions. To celebrate the depth and richness of his work and discuss its implications for the future, the editors have brought together an impressive range of leading scholars from different jurisdictions in the fields of comparative and international law, evidence and criminal law and procedure. Using Professor Damaška's work as a backdrop, the essays make a substantial contribution to the development of comparative law, procedure and evidence. After an introduction by the editors and a tribute by Harold Koh, Dean of Yale Law School, the book is divided into four parts. The first part considers contemporary trends in national criminal procedure, examining cross-fertilisation and the extent to which these trends are resulting in converging practices across national jurisdictions. The second part explores the epistemological environment of rules of evidence and procedure. The third part analyses human rights standards and the phenomenon of hybridisation in transnational and international criminal law. The final part of the book assesses Professor Damaška 's contribution to comparative law and the challenges faced by comparative law in the twenty first century.
Crimmigration Law provides readers with a fundamental understanding of this developing area of law, tracks the legal developments that have created crimmigration law, and explains the many ways that the line between criminal law and immigration law has melted away.
It is often said that criminal procedure should ensure that the defendant is a subject, not just an object, of proceedings. This book asks to what extent this can be said to be true of international criminal trials. The first part of the book aims to find out the extent to which defendants before international criminal courts are able to take an active part in their trials. It takes an in-depth look at the procedural regimes of international courts, viewed against a benchmark provided by national provisions representing the main traditions of criminal procedure and by international human rights law. The results of this comparative endeavour are then used to shed light, from a practical point of view, on the oft-debated question whether (international) criminal trials should be used as a tool for writing history or whether, as claimed by Martti Koskenniemi, pursuing this goal leads to a danger of "show trials†?.
International criminal law has seen significant developments in recent years, as the jurisprudence of the International Criminal Court has expanded, alongside the practice of other international criminal tribunals. International criminal law is increasingly a concern of domestic courts as well, with international legal issues arising from domestic cases. This book presents a comprehensive overview of the field, assessing the subject in the context of wider public international law. In particular, this book complements discussion of the 'core crimes' of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, with a full treatment of wider issues that arise. These include the international rules governing national criminal jurisdiction; the crime of piracy; the raft of multilateral treaties defining and creating obligations in respect of international crimes, including terrorist crimes, and of the so-far unsuccessful attempts to conclude a comprehensive convention on terrorism; the prosecution and punishment of international crimes at the national level; and the activities of the United Nations Security Council in relation to international crimes.This book provides an in-depth study of the ways in which domestic courts prosecute international crimes. Its analysis encompasses the international rules on the permissible reach of national criminal jurisdiction; the substantive law of international crimes; the prosecution and punishment of international crimes, and the prosecution and punishment of municipal crimes by international criminal courts or by municipal courts with international elements; and the involvement of international organs, such as the United Nations Security Council, in the suppression of international and municipal criminal wrongdoing. The book also includes more formal conceptual analysis of the very notion of an 'international crime' and of an 'international criminal tribunal', as well as a detailed account of the rise of individual criminal responsibility under international law. The book is written in a direct, concise, and precise style, making it a perfect resource for ICL practitioners, as well as scholars and advanced students.

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