Most people engage in crime at some point in their lives, but why does almost everybody stop soon after? And, why do a small number of offenders persist in crime? These two questions constitute the core of the field often known as life-course criminology. This book provides a comprehensive introduction to life-course criminology. It covers the dominant theories and methodologies in the field and equips you with all you need to succeed in your studies on the subject. The book: Discusses the methodologies of life-course and longitudinal research Explains and critiques the major theories of life-course criminology Considers the issues of risk, prediction, onset, persistence and desistance of criminal activity Draws on research from studies in Europe, the UK, US and Australia, including the Stockholm Life-Course Project Written by two leading figures in the field, this is an authoritative text that will guide you through your studies in life-course criminology, criminal career research, and developmental criminology.
In recent years, the lifecourse perspective has become a popular theoretical orientation toward crime. Yet despite its growing importance in the field of criminology, most textbooks give it only cursory treatment. Crime and the Lifecourse: An Introduction by Michael L. Benson provides a comprehensive overview of contemporary research and theory on the life-course approach to crime. The book emphasizes a conceptual understanding of this approach. A special feature is the integration of qualitative and quantitative research on criminal life histories. This book: provides an overview of the life course approach and describes the major concepts and issues in lifecourse theory as it applies to criminology reviews evidence on biological and genetic influences on crime reviews research on the role of the family in crime and juvenile delinquency provides a detailed discussion of the criminological lifecourse theories of Moffitt, Hagan, Sampson and Laub, and others discusses the connections between youthful crime and adult outcomes in education, occupation, and marriage presents an application of the lifecourse approach to white-collar crime discusses how macro sociological and historical developments have influenced the shape of the lifecourse in American society as it relates to patterns in crime.
"After reviewing dozens of books, this text provided the best basic foundation and the study website is excellent." -Michelle Ronda, Marymount Manhattan College The Sixth Edition of Introduction to Criminology: Theories, Methods, and Criminal Behavior is a comprehensive introduction to the study of criminology, with a chapter devoted to the criminal justice system. Valued and admired for the author's easy-to-read writing style and the text's overall accessibility, this book concentrates on the vital core of criminological theory-theory, method, and criminal behavior-and successfully avoids an overly legal or crime control orientation. Updated throughout and with a visually engaging new two-color design, the Sixth Edition investigates all major forms of criminal activity, including organized crime, white collar crime, political crime, and environmental crime. Author Frank E. Hagan explains the methods of operation, the effects on society, and how various theories account for criminal behavior. New to the Sixth Edition Offers expanded treatment of theory: An additional theory chapter (Chapter 5) explores psychological and biological theories, and the author has provided additional coverage of Developmental/Life Course theory in Chapter 6. Presents expanded detail on many types of crime: The book features comprehensive treatment of all crime typologies. Provides broader coverage of crime in its various forms: With major coverage of white collar, political, and organized crime, the text fully addresses topics such as Warez software piracy, spies, assassins, new organized crime groups, and major corporate scandals. Incorporates updated and new "Crime Files" and "In the News" boxes: New captivating examples include the Virginia Tech shootings; the BTK killer; Washington, DC snipers; Red Lake Massacre; and the Hanssen Spy case. Includes a new final chapter on the criminal justice system (Chapter 14): This chapter provides a brief overview to acquaint students who have not had a separate course on the justice system. Features an updated photo program: Contemporary visual representations bring to life the theories and crime typologies covered in the text. Accompanied by High Quality Ancillaries Student Study Site at www.sagepub.com/haganstudy: The study site includes self-quizzes, links to interesting and useful audio and video files (NPR and PBS radio archives, Frontline videos), carefully selected journal articles, Web research exercises, E-flashcards, and more. Instructors' Resources on CD-ROM: include a computerized test bank, PowerPoint slides for each chapter, classroom activities, and more. Qualified instructors can request a copy by contacting SAGE Customer Care at 1.800.818.7243 (6am-5pm PT). Intended Audience This is an excellent text for undergraduate courses such as Criminology, Deviant Behavior, and Crime and Society in departments of criminal justice, criminology, and sociology.
Since its introduction in the latter half of the 1980s, the meticulous study of distinct criminal career dimensions, like onset, frequency, and crime mix, has yielded a wealth of information on the way crime develops over the life-span. Policymakers in turn have used this information in their efforts to tailor criminal justice interventions to be both effective and efficient. Life-course criminology studies the ways in which the criminal career is embedded in the totality of the individual life-course and seeks to clarify the causal mechanisms governing this process. The Routledge International Handbook of Life-Course Criminology provides an authoritative collection of international theoretical and empirical research into the way that criminal behavior develops over the life-span, which causal mechanisms are involved in shaping this development, and to what degree criminal justice interventions are successful in redirecting offenders’ criminal trajectories. Drawing upon qualitative and quantitative research this handbook covers theory, describes and compares criminal career patterns across different countries, tests current explanations of criminal development, and using cutting-edge methods, assesses the intended and unintended effects of formal interventions. This book is the first of its kind to offer a comprehensive overview of state-of-the-art developments in criminal career and life-course research, providing unique perspectives and exclusive local knowledge from over 50 international scholars. This book is an ideal companion for teachers and researchers engaged in the field of developmental and life-course criminology.
Developmental and life-course criminology aims to provide information about how offending and antisocial behavior develops, about risk and protective factors at different ages, and about the effects of life events on the course of development. This volume advances knowledge about these theories of offender behavior, many of which have been formulated only in the last twenty years. It also integrates knowledge about individual, family, peer, school, neighborhood, community, and situational influences on offender behavior, and combines key elements of earlier theories such as strain, social learning, differential association, and control theory. Contributors Benjamin B. Lahey and Irwin D. Waldman focus on antisocial propensity and the importance of biological and individual factors. Alex R. Piquero and Terrie E. Moffitt distinguish between life-course-persistent and adolescent-limited offenders. David P. Farrington presents the Integrated Cognitive Antisocial Potential (ICAP) theory, which distinguishes between long-term and short-term influences on antisocial potential. Richard F. Catalano, J. David Hawkins, and their colleagues test the Social Development Model (SDM). Marc Le Blanc proposes an integrated multi-layered control theory, in which criminal behavior depends on bonding to society, psychological development, modeling, and constraints. Robert J. Sampson and John H. Laub hypothesize that offending is inhibited by the strength of bonding to family, peers, schools, and later adult social institutions such as marriage and jobs. Terence P. Thornberry and Marvin D. Krohn propose an interactional theory, of antisocial behavior. Per-Olof H. Witkstr�m's developmental ecological action theory emphasizes the importance of situational factors: opportunities cause temptation, friction produces provocation, and monitoring and the risk of sanctions have deterrent effects.
This book provides a comprehensive and up-to-date introduction to criminological theory for students taking courses in criminology at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. Building on previous editions, which broadened the debate on criminological theory, this book presents the latest research and theoretical developments. The text is divided into five parts, the first three of which address ideal type models of criminal behaviour: the rational actor, predestined actor and victimized actor models. Within these, the various criminological theories are located chronologically in the context of one of these different traditions, and the strengths and weaknesses of each theory and model are clearly identified. The fourth part of the book looks closely at more recent attempts to integrate theoretical elements from both within and across models of criminal behaviour, while the fifth part addresses a number of key recent concerns of criminology: postmodernism, cultural criminology, globalization and communitarianism. All major theoretical perspectives are considered, including: classical criminology, biological and psychological positivism, labelling theories, feminist criminology, critical criminology and left realism, social control theories, the risk society. The new edition also features comprehensive coverage of recent developments in criminology, including situation action theory, desistance theory, peacemaking criminology, Loïc Wacquant’s thesis of the penal society, critical race theory and Southern theory. This revised and expanded fourth edition of An Introduction to Criminological Theory includes chapter summaries, critical thinking questions, a full glossary of terms and theories and a timeline of criminological theory, making it essential reading for those studying criminology.
This book brings together prominent investigators to provide a comprehensive guide to doing life course research, including an “inside view” of how they designed and carried out influential longitudinal studies. Using vivid examples, the contributors trace the connections between early and later experience and reveal how researchers and graduate students can discover these links in their own research. Well-organized chapters describe the best and newest ways to: *Use surveys, life records, ethnography, and data archives to collect different types of data over years or even decades. *Apply innovative statistical methods to measure dynamic processes that result in improvement, decline, or reversibility in economic fortune, stress, health, and criminality. *Explore the micro- and macro-level explanatory factors that shape individual trajectories, including genetic and environmental interactions, personal life history, interpersonal ties, and sociocultural institutions.
Why do individuals exposed to the same environment turn out so differently, with some engaging in crime and others abiding by societal rules and norms? Why are males involved in violent crime more often than females? And why do the precursors of serious pathological behavior typically emerge in childhood? Criminals in the Making: Criminality Across the Life Course, Second Edition, by John Paul Wright, Stephen G. Tibbetts, and Leah E. Daigle, addresses key questions surrounding criminal propensity by discussing studies of the life-course perspective—criminological research that links biological factors associated with criminality with the social and environmental agents thought to cause, facilitate, or otherwise influence a tendency towards criminal activity. The book provides comprehensive, interdisciplinary coverage of the current thinking in the field about criminal behavior over the course of a lifetime. Additionally, it highlights interventions proven effective and illustrates how the life-course perspective has contributed to a greater understanding of the causes of crime.
A unique text/reader that takes a comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach to the study of criminology Providing an affordable alternative to the standard textbook, this new edition of the authors’ popular text/reader provides instructors and students the best of both worlds – authored text with carefully selected accompanying readings. Now thoroughly updated with new articles, new content, and new statistics, tables, and figures, this Second Edition provides an interdisciplinary perspective on crime and criminality that incorporates the latest theories, concepts, and research from sociology, psychology, genetics, evolutionary biology, and the neurosciences. The new edition is divided into 15 sections that mirror chapters in a typical criminology textbook. New to This Edition: A new Section 11 on Mass Murder and Terrorism makes coverage of these high-interest topics even more accessible. Section 10 now focuses only on murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, and domestic violence, making it easier for students to absorb the material. New articles appear in the structural theories section, the sections devoted to violent crime, and throughout the text/reader as needed. The authors now more closely link sections on types of crime to sections on theory to give readers a more cohesive understanding of the connections between the two. Contemporary criminologists’ favored theories (drawn from a survey of 770 criminologists) now appear in a table to give readers insight into the professional opinion today on criminological theories. Features: Each Section has a 15-page introduction (a "mini-chapter”) that contains vignettes, photos, tables and graphs, end-of-chapter questions, and Web exercises, followed by three to four supporting readings. Theory Section introductions contain a unique table that compares and contrasts the theories presented, while theory concluding sub-sections focus on policy and crime prevention. A "How to Read a Research Article" guide (which appears prior to the first reading) illustrates key aspects of a research article. The book’s readings are drawn from carefully selected, edited journal articles appropriate for an undergraduate audience.
An Introduction to Crime & Criminology 4e, continues to bring together some of Australia’s most widely respected authorities on criminology. The text explores popular knowledge and understanding about crime, contrasting it with what we know about crime from official sources as well as from crime victims. The authors present and analyse the various ways that crime is defined and measured, the many and varied dimensions of crime, the broad range of theories offered to explain crime as well as some of the main ways governments and other agencies respond to and attempt to prevent crime.
An Introduction to Critical Criminology offers an accessible introduction to foundational and contemporary theories and perspectives in critical criminology which introduces students to theories and perspectives about the causes of crime, and the operation of the criminal justice system.
Introduction to Criminology, Why Do They Do It?, Second Edition, by Pamela J. Schram Stephen G. Tibbetts, offers a contemporary and integrated discussion of the key theories that help us understand crime in the 21st century. With a focus on why offenders commit crimes, this bestseller skillfully engages students with real-world cases and examples to help students explore the fundamentals of criminology. To better align with how instructors actually teach this course, coverage of violent and property crimes has been integrated into the theory chapters, so students can clearly understand the application of theory to criminal behavior. Unlike other introductory criminology textbooks, the Second Edition discusses issues of diversity in each chapter and covers many contemporary topics that are not well represented in other texts, such as feminist criminology, cybercrime, hate crimes, white-collar crime, homeland security, and identity theft. Transnational comparisons regarding crime rates and the methods other countries use to deal with crime make this edition the most universal to date and a perfect companion for those wanting to learn about criminology in context.
An Introduction to Crime & Criminology 4e, continues to bring together some of Australia’s most widely respected authorities on criminology. The text explores popular knowledge and understanding about crime, contrasting it with what we know about crime from official sources as well as from crime victims. The authors present and analyse the various ways that crime is defined and measured, the many and varied dimensions of crime, the broad range of theories offered to explain crime as well as some of the main ways governments and other agencies respond to and attempt to prevent crime.
An Introduction to Crime and Crime Causation is a student-friendly textbook that defines and explains the concepts of crime, criminal law, and criminology. Ideal for a one-semester course, the book compares and contrasts early criminal behavior and today’s modern forms of crime. It also explores society’s responses to criminal behavior in the past and in the present day. It covers both major and lesser-known crime causation theories and their impact on society. Topics covered include: The importance of understanding crime data The goals of punishment The history of criminology, including the influence of social Darwinism on early trait theorists Crime causation theories, including a comparison of mainstream and critical theories The relationship between crime and biology, including the influence of genetics, substance use, and mental illness The social structural approach to crime, including a consideration of the changing contexts of urban criminality The nature and function of the justice system at the local, state, and federal levels, and basic categories of crimes Drug trafficking crimes, drug court efforts, and perceived weaknesses in current antidrug efforts Each chapter begins with a set of objectives and concludes with a summary. Interactive questions promote classroom discussion and practicum sections facilitate contextual learning. Drawn from different and distinct backgrounds, the authors each have unique perspectives on crime, making for a particularly well-rounded text that explores crime from several angles. The book attempts to educate readers in the development of new insights on crime and crime causation and provides a greater understanding of the steps that need to be taken before a significant reduction in crime can occur.
"...what makes the book stand out is the inclusion of real research into various criminal justice institutions that have actually been undertaken by the authors. In doing so, what is produced is a book that stimulates interest and injects research passion, as well as offering research ‘know how’ into what can often be a difficult and sometimes dry area of research." Tina Patel, Liverpool John Moores University "This book provides an essential tool for undergraduate students embarking upon their own research projects in Criminology. It provides clear and informative guidance on a range of research methods and designs to assist students in their own criminological endeavours." Jacki Tapley, University of Portsmouth How do criminologists go about studying crime and its consequences? How are programmes for offenders and communities evaluated? How can you collect and analyse criminological material? Research on crime and criminality is often referred to by the media, policy makers and practitioners, but where does this research come from and how reliable is it? Designed especially for students on criminology and criminal justice courses, and professionals working in the field,Researching Criminologyemphasises the importance of research as an integrated process. It looks at the ways in which a mixture of investigative methods can be used to analyze a criminological question. Written by two experienced researchers and lecturersResearching Criminologyis a comprehensive introduction to the aims, principles and methods of doing criminological research. The book covers all the key topics that you will encounter when researching crime. Individual chapters include material on: The research process Principles of researching criminology How to design criminological research Evaluation research Researching ethically A glossary of essential key concepts Structured in three parts, addressing the principles of criminological research, how to collect and analyse material and providing detailed examples of real world research,Researching Criminologywill be of benefit to all students of criminology and criminal justice, for practitioners interested in criminological research, and for those undertaking criminological research for the first time.
Assuming no prior knowledge, this text provides a clear and user-friendly introduction to the key definitions and issues of crime. With an unrivalled combination of scope plus introductory pitch, this is a one-stop shop for undergraduates taking their first modules in criminology and criminal justice.
The developmental and life-course perspective in criminology came to prominence during the late 1980s and throughout the 1990s a number of theories were developed to explain offending behavior over the life-course. This volume brings together theoretical statements, empirical tests and debates of these major theories within the developmental and life-course criminology perspective. In the first section of the book, original theoretical statements are provided and this is followed by a section which includes empirical tests of each of these theories conducted by researchers other than the original theorists. The final section of the book provides a summary of the major debates both within the developmental and life-course perspective and also between this perspective and others within criminology. This comprehensive volume provides an informative overview of the developmental and life-course perspective in criminology.
What exactly is self-control, and what life outcomes does it affect? What causes a person to have high or low self-control to begin with? What effect does self-control have on crime and other harmful behavior? Using a clear, conversational writing style, Self-Control and Crime Over the Life Course answers critical questions about self-control and its importance for understanding criminal behavior. Authors Carter Hay and Ryan Meldrum use intuitive examples to draw attention to the close connection between self-control and the behavioral choices people make, especially in reference to criminal, deviant, and harmful behaviors that often carry short-term benefits but long-term costs. The text builds an overall theoretical perspective that conveys the multi-disciplinary nature of modern-day self-control research. Moreover, far from emphasizing only theoretical issues, the authors place public policy at the forefront, using self-control research to inform policy efforts that reduce the societal costs of low self-control and the behaviors it enables.
Crime is a topic that is of considerable interest to policy-makers, politicians and the public alike. We want to know what factors can explain the nature and prevalence of crime in society and use this knowledge to better develop approaches for managing criminal behaviour. This book provides a comprehensive overview of approaches to understanding crime and criminal behaviour, with a focus on psychological perspectives. A wide range of different types of criminal behaviour are considered, including juvenile crime, violent offending, sexual offending, collective violence and drug use. For each type of offence a clear overview of key conceptual and methodological issues is provided, along with a detailed consideration of the major theoretical approaches that have been developed. The book concludes by considering how our theoretical understanding of crime can inform our responses to criminal behaviour in terms of punishment, prevention and rehabilitation. Key features of the book include: • an in-depth coverage of a broad range of different types of criminal behaviour; • inclusion of a diverse range of different theoretical perspectives; • accessibly written, with extensive use of case studies, boxes and activities; • an extensive use of up-to-date references that highlight the current state of knowledge in the field of criminal psychology. This book should be of interest to students, academics, researchers and practitioners with an interest in criminal behaviour, and is particularly suitable for undergraduate courses in criminal psychology, forensic psychology and psychological criminology.
This new and expanded edition builds upon material from the highly successful first edition. A comprehensive textbook on the criminal justice system, the book assesses the main theories concerned with the causes of crime (including white-collar and corporate crime), discusses the operation of all key criminal justice agencies – including the police, probation and prison services and the legal and youth justice systems –and identifies the main themes underpinning contemporary criminal justice policy. Key additions include: updated material from the first edition, incorporating changes to criminal justice policy introduced by the 2010 Coalition government; a new chapter that presents an overview of the criminal justice system; discussions of the evolving EU criminal justice system and the implications of this for UK criminal justice policy. The book is an ideal text for students taking courses in criminal justice, or studying criminal justice as a component of a broader course in criminology or the social sciences and practitoners within these fields. It is written in a highly accessible manner and has a wide range of features that include questions, key chapter themes, a timeline of main events, a glossary of key terms, a website resource guide.

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