Unlike many other texts on differential geometry, this textbook also offers interesting applications to geometric mechanics and general relativity. The first part is a concise and self-contained introduction to the basics of manifolds, differential forms, metrics and curvature. The second part studies applications to mechanics and relativity including the proofs of the Hawking and Penrose singularity theorems. It can be independently used for one-semester courses in either of these subjects. The main ideas are illustrated and further developed by numerous examples and over 300 exercises. Detailed solutions are provided for many of these exercises, making An Introduction to Riemannian Geometry ideal for self-study.
In recent years the methods of modern differential geometry have become of considerable importance in theoretical physics and have found application in relativity and cosmology, high-energy physics and field theory, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics and mechanics. This textbook provides an introduction to these methods - in particular Lie derivatives, Lie groups and differential forms - and covers their extensive applications to theoretical physics. The reader is assumed to have some familiarity with advanced calculus, linear algebra and a little elementary operator theory. The advanced physics undergraduate should therefore find the presentation quite accessible. This account will prove valuable for those with backgrounds in physics and applied mathematics who desire an introduction to the subject. Having studied the book, the reader will be able to comprehend research papers that use this mathematics and follow more advanced pure-mathematical expositions.
This textbook delves into the theory behind differentiable manifolds while exploring various physics applications along the way. Included throughout the book are a collection of exercises of varying degrees of difficulty. Differentiable Manifolds is intended for graduate students and researchers interested in a theoretical physics approach to the subject. Prerequisites include multivariable calculus, linear algebra, and differential equations and a basic knowledge of analytical mechanics.
“General Relativity Without Calculus” offers a compact but mathematically correct introduction to the general theory of relativity, assuming only a basic knowledge of high school mathematics and physics. Targeted at first year undergraduates (and advanced high school students) who wish to learn Einstein’s theory beyond popular science accounts, it covers the basics of special relativity, Minkowski space-time, non-Euclidean geometry, Newtonian gravity, the Schwarzschild solution, black holes and cosmology. The quick-paced style is balanced by over 75 exercises (including full solutions), allowing readers to test and consolidate their understanding.
From the coauthor of Differential Geometry of Curves and Surfaces, this companion book presents the extension of differential geometry from curves and surfaces to manifolds in general. It provides a broad introduction to the field of differentiable and Riemannian manifolds, tying together the classical and modern formulations. The three appendices provide background information on point set topology, calculus of variations, and multilinear algebra—topics that may not have been covered in the prerequisite courses of multivariable calculus and linear algebra. Differential Geometry of Manifolds takes a practical approach, containing extensive exercises and focusing on applications of differential geometry in physics, including the Hamiltonian formulation of dynamics (with a view toward symplectic manifolds), the tensorial formulation of electromagnetism, some string theory, and some fundamental concepts in general relativity.
This is the second edition of this best selling problem book for students, now containing over 400 completely solved exercises on differentiable manifolds, Lie theory, fibre bundles and Riemannian manifolds. The exercises go from elementary computations to rather sophisticated tools. Many of the definitions and theorems used throughout are explained in the first section of each chapter where they appear. A 56-page collection of formulae is included which can be useful as an aide-mémoire, even for teachers and researchers on those topics. In this 2nd edition: • 76 new problems • a section devoted to a generalization of Gauss’ Lemma • a short novel section dealing with some properties of the energy of Hopf vector fields • an expanded collection of formulae and tables • an extended bibliography Audience This book will be useful to advanced undergraduate and graduate students of mathematics, theoretical physics and some branches of engineering with a rudimentary knowledge of linear and multilinear algebra.
Manifolds, the higher-dimensional analogs of smooth curves and surfaces, are fundamental objects in modern mathematics. Combining aspects of algebra, topology, and analysis, manifolds have also been applied to classical mechanics, general relativity, and quantum field theory. In this streamlined introduction to the subject, the theory of manifolds is presented with the aim of helping the reader achieve a rapid mastery of the essential topics. By the end of the book the reader should be able to compute, at least for simple spaces, one of the most basic topological invariants of a manifold, its de Rham cohomology. Along the way, the reader acquires the knowledge and skills necessary for further study of geometry and topology. The requisite point-set topology is included in an appendix of twenty pages; other appendices review facts from real analysis and linear algebra. Hints and solutions are provided to many of the exercises and problems. This work may be used as the text for a one-semester graduate or advanced undergraduate course, as well as by students engaged in self-study. Requiring only minimal undergraduate prerequisites, 'Introduction to Manifolds' is also an excellent foundation for Springer's GTM 82, 'Differential Forms in Algebraic Topology'.
This is a self-contained introductory textbook on the calculus of differential forms and modern differential geometry. The intended audience is physicists, so the author emphasises applications and geometrical reasoning in order to give results and concepts a precise but intuitive meaning without getting bogged down in analysis. The large number of diagrams helps elucidate the fundamental ideas. Mathematical topics covered include differentiable manifolds, differential forms and twisted forms, the Hodge star operator, exterior differential systems and symplectic geometry. All of the mathematics is motivated and illustrated by useful physical examples.
Comprehensive treatment of the essentials of modern differential geometry and topology for graduate students in mathematics and the physical sciences.
This graduate-level monographic textbook treats applied differential geometry from a modern scientific perspective. Co-authored by the originator of the world's leading human motion simulator ? ?Human Biodynamics Engine?, a complex, 264-DOF bio-mechanical system, modeled by differential-geometric tools ? this is the first book that combines modern differential geometry with a wide spectrum of applications, from modern mechanics and physics, via nonlinear control, to biology and human sciences. The book is designed for a two-semester course, which gives mathematicians a variety of applications for their theory and physicists, as well as other scientists and engineers, a strong theory underlying their models.
Accessible, concise, and self-contained, this book offers an outstanding introduction to three related subjects: differential geometry, differential topology, and dynamical systems. Topics of special interest addressed in the book include Brouwer's fixed point theorem, Morse Theory, and the geodesic flow. Smooth manifolds, Riemannian metrics, affine connections, the curvature tensor, differential forms, and integration on manifolds provide the foundation for many applications in dynamical systems and mechanics. The authors also discuss the Gauss-Bonnet theorem and its implications in non-Euclidean geometry models. The differential topology aspect of the book centers on classical, transversality theory, Sard's theorem, intersection theory, and fixed-point theorems. The construction of the de Rham cohomology builds further arguments for the strong connection between the differential structure and the topological structure. It also furnishes some of the tools necessary for a complete understanding of the Morse theory. These discussions are followed by an introduction to the theory of hyperbolic systems, with emphasis on the quintessential role of the geodesic flow. The integration of geometric theory, topological theory, and concrete applications to dynamical systems set this book apart. With clean, clear prose and effective examples, the authors' intuitive approach creates a treatment that is comprehensible to relative beginners, yet rigorous enough for those with more background and experience in the field.
This reference book, which has found wide use as a text, provides an answer to the needs of graduate physical mathematics students and their teachers. The present edition is a thorough revision of the first, including a new chapter entitled ``Connections on Principle Fibre Bundles'' which includes sections on holonomy, characteristic classes, invariant curvature integrals and problems on the geometry of gauge fields, monopoles, instantons, spin structure and spin connections. Many paragraphs have been rewritten, and examples and exercises added to ease the study of several chapters. The index includes over 130 entries.
This volume presents a collection of problems and solutions in differential geometry with applications. Both introductory and advanced topics are introduced in an easy-to-digest manner, with the materials of the volume being self-contained. In particular, curves, surfaces, Riemannian and pseudo-Riemannian manifolds, Hodge duality operator, vector fields and Lie series, differential forms, matrix-valued differential forms, Maurer–Cartan form, and the Lie derivative are covered. Readers will find useful applications to special and general relativity, Yang–Mills theory, hydrodynamics and field theory. Besides the solved problems, each chapter contains stimulating supplementary problems and software implementations are also included. The volume will not only benefit students in mathematics, applied mathematics and theoretical physics, but also researchers in the field of differential geometry. Request Inspection Copy
This text presents differential forms from a geometric perspective accessible at the undergraduate level. It begins with basic concepts such as partial differentiation and multiple integration and gently develops the entire machinery of differential forms. The subject is approached with the idea that complex concepts can be built up by analogy from simpler cases, which, being inherently geometric, often can be best understood visually. Each new concept is presented with a natural picture that students can easily grasp. Algebraic properties then follow. The book contains excellent motivation, numerous illustrations and solutions to selected problems.
This book covers the topics of differential manifolds, Riemannian metrics, connections, geodesics and curvature, with special emphasis on the intrinsic features of the subject. It treats in detail classical results on the relations between curvature and topology. The book features numerous exercises with full solutions and a series of detailed examples are picked up repeatedly to illustrate each new definition or property introduced.
The Standard Model is the foundation of modern particle and high energy physics. This book explains the mathematical background behind the Standard Model, translating ideas from physics into a mathematical language and vice versa. The first part of the book covers the mathematical theory of Lie groups and Lie algebras, fibre bundles, connections, curvature and spinors. The second part then gives a detailed exposition of how these concepts are applied in physics, concerning topics such as the Lagrangians of gauge and matter fields, spontaneous symmetry breaking, the Higgs boson and mass generation of gauge bosons and fermions. The book also contains a chapter on advanced and modern topics in particle physics, such as neutrino masses, CP violation and Grand Unification. This carefully written textbook is aimed at graduate students of mathematics and physics. It contains numerous examples and more than 150 exercises, making it suitable for self-study and use alongside lecture courses. Only a basic knowledge of differentiable manifolds and special relativity is required, summarized in the appendix.
A development of the basic theory and applications of mechanics with an emphasis on the role of symmetry. The book includes numerous specific applications, making it beneficial to physicists and engineers. Specific examples and applications show how the theory works, backed by up-to-date techniques, all of which make the text accessible to a wide variety of readers, especially senior undergraduates and graduates in mathematics, physics and engineering. This second edition has been rewritten and updated for clarity throughout, with a major revamping and expansion of the exercises. Internet supplements containing additional material are also available.
This book provides an introduction to Riemannian geometry, the geometry of curved spaces, for use in a graduate course. Requiring only an understanding of differentiable manifolds, the author covers the introductory ideas of Riemannian geometry followed by a selection of more specialized topics. Also featured are Notes and Exercises for each chapter, to develop and enrich the reader's appreciation of the subject. This second edition, first published in 2006, has a clearer treatment of many topics than the first edition, with new proofs of some theorems and a new chapter on the Riemannian geometry of surfaces. The main themes here are the effect of the curvature on the usual notions of classical Euclidean geometry, and the new notions and ideas motivated by curvature itself. Completely new themes created by curvature include the classical Rauch comparison theorem and its consequences in geometry and topology, and the interaction of microscopic behavior of the geometry with the macroscopic structure of the space.
Elementary Differential Geometry presents the main results in the differential geometry of curves and surfaces suitable for a first course on the subject. Prerequisites are kept to an absolute minimum – nothing beyond first courses in linear algebra and multivariable calculus – and the most direct and straightforward approach is used throughout. New features of this revised and expanded second edition include: a chapter on non-Euclidean geometry, a subject that is of great importance in the history of mathematics and crucial in many modern developments. The main results can be reached easily and quickly by making use of the results and techniques developed earlier in the book. Coverage of topics such as: parallel transport and its applications; map colouring; holonomy and Gaussian curvature. Around 200 additional exercises, and a full solutions manual for instructors, available via www.springer.com ul>
Intended for a one year course, this text serves as a single source, introducing readers to the important techniques and theorems, while also containing enough background on advanced topics to appeal to those students wishing to specialize in Riemannian geometry. This is one of the few Works to combine both the geometric parts of Riemannian geometry and the analytic aspects of the theory. The book will appeal to a readership that have a basic knowledge of standard manifold theory, including tensors, forms, and Lie groups. Important revisions to the third edition include: a substantial addition of unique and enriching exercises scattered throughout the text; inclusion of an increased number of coordinate calculations of connection and curvature; addition of general formulas for curvature on Lie Groups and submersions; integration of variational calculus into the text allowing for an early treatment of the Sphere theorem using a proof by Berger; incorporation of several recent results about manifolds with positive curvature; presentation of a new simplifying approach to the Bochner technique for tensors with application to bound topological quantities with general lower curvature bounds. From reviews of the first edition: "The book can be highly recommended to all mathematicians who want to get a more profound idea about the most interesting achievements in Riemannian geometry. It is one of the few comprehensive sources of this type." ―Bernd Wegner, ZbMATH

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