In recent years the study of nursing history in Britain has been transformed by the application of concepts and methods from the social sciences to original sources. The myths and legends which have grown up through a century of anecdotal writing have been chipped away to reveal the complex story of an occupation shaped and reshaped by social and technological change. Most of the work has been scattered in monographs, journals and edited collections. The skills of a social historian, a sociologist and a graduate nurse have been brought together to rethink the history of modern nursing in the light of the latest scholarship. The account starts by looking at the type of nursing care available in 1800. This was usually provided by the sick person's family or household servants. It traces the interdependent growth of general nursing and the modern hospital and examines the separate origins and eventual integration of mental nursing, district nursing, health visiting and midwifery. It concludes with reflections on the prospects for nursing in the year 2000.
From the colonial period through to the 20th century, this text examines the intersection of medical science, social theory and cultural practices as they shaped relations among wet nurses, physicians and families. It explores how Americans used wet nursing to solve infant feeding problems, shows why wet nursing became controversial as motherhood slowly became medicalized, and elaborates how the development of scientific infant feeding eliminated wet nursing by the beginning of the 20th century. Janet Golden's study contributes to our understanding of the cultural authority of medical science, the role of physicians in shaping child rearing practices, the social construction of motherhood, and the profound dilemmas of class and culture that played out in the private space of the nursery.
Nurses who conduct research have a longstanding interest in questions of nursing knowledge. Nursing Knowledge is a clear and well-informed exposition of the philosophical background to nursing theory and research. Nursing Knowledge answers such fundamental questions as: How is nursing theory related to nursing practice? What are the core elements of nursing knowledge? What makes nursing research distinctive as nursing research? It examines the history of the philosophical debates within nursing, critiques the arguments, explains the implications and sets out to rethink the philosophical foundation of nursing science. Nursing Knowledge begins with philosophical problems that arise within nursing science. It then considers various solutions with the help of philosophical ideas arguingargues that nurses ought to adopt certain philosophical positions because they are the best solutions to the problems that nurses encounter. The book argues claims that the nursing standpoint has the potential to disclose a more complete understanding of human health than the common disease-and-dysfunction views. Because of the relationship to practice, nursing science may freely draw theory from other disciplines and nursing practice unifies nursing research. By redefining theory and philosophy,With a new philosophical perspective on nursing science, the so-called relevance gap between nursing theory and practice can be closed. The final chapter of the book ‘redraws the map’, to create a new picture of nursing science based on the following principles: Problems of practice should guide nursing research Practice and theory are dynamically related Theory research must provide the knowledge base necessary for nurse interventions, training, patient education, etc. Nursing research should develop midrange theories and its results are nursing theory is strengthened when it uses theories confirmed by is integrated with other disciplines Key features Clear and accessibly written Accurate and philosophically well-informed, Discusses philosophical problems in contexts familiar to nurses Systematically examines the philosophical issues involved in nursing research Examines epistemology (how we know what we know), theory development, and the philosophical foundations of scientific methodology. Develops a new model of nursing knowledge Dr. Mark Risjord is Associate Professor in Philosophy at Emory University, and has a faculty appointment in the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing. His main research areas have been in the philosophy of social science and the philosophy of medicine. He was invited to has been teaching philosophy of science and theory development in the new PhD program in the Nell Hodgson School of Nursing at Emory University insince 1999. He has been awarded two competitive teaching prizes: Emory Williams Distinguished Teaching Award (2004) and the Excellence in Teaching Award (1997). He is presently serving as the Masse-Martin/NEH Distinguished Teaching Chair (2006-2010).
This book takes a fresh look at community nursing history in Great Britain, examining the essentially generalist and low profile, domiciliary end of the professional nursing spectrum throughout the twentieth century. It charts the most significant changes affecting the nurse’s work on the district including compulsory registration for general nursing, changes in organization, training, conditions of service, and workload. A strong oral history component provides a unique insight into the professional images of district nursing and the complexities of inter- and intra-professional relationships as well as into the changing day-to-day working experiences of the district nurse at ‘grass-roots’ level. Use of oral history and records of individual nurses attempts to rectify the tendency of nursing history to view nurses as if they were a homogenous group of professionals, thereby recognizing the different experiences of nurses in different regions and environments. The book also considers the degree of influence of medically related technologies and of developments in drugs, materials, communications, and transport on the professional development of district nursing. The work addresses issues of gender relationships central to a nursing profession largely composed of women (throughout much of the period) working alongside a largely male-dominated medical profession.
This book is a collection of original sources for studying the social history of medicine in England from around 1700 to the end of the 19th century. The sources illustrate the main themes in the relationship of medicine to society, especially from the patient's viewpoint. The extracts from diaries, accounts and correspondence include material from record offices and private owners. Material is included from all the English counties and London, as well as national surveys. Topics covered include medical practice and practitioners; nurses and midwives; patients' own accounts of illness; diseases and treatments; mortality; institutions; charities; and the welfare state. Each section has an introduction to the topic, followed by the extracts and suggestions for further reading. A general introduction discusses the sources, where they are to be found, recent research and how to interpret the material.
Focusing on the nurse researcher's dual role as practitioner and researcher, as well as research ethics and the relationship between practitioner and academic agendas, The Reality of Nursing Research helps to: locate the practical dilemmas of nursing research in historical and policy context prepare those about to embark on research for some of the issues they will face reassure researchers that they are not the only ones to encounter the complexity of real life research support the research teacher or supervisor in preparing and mentoring their students share experiences of others who have encountered similar issues and provide some practical advice on their solution. With illustrative case studies and practical advice, this book looks at the real life dilemmas faced by nurse researchers at key stages of the research process from developing a research question through to disseminating the findings. It is an essential text for nurse researchers, teachers of research, research supervisors and nurses undertaking research at diploma through to doctoral level.
A CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title 2014! 2014 winner of the American Association for the History of Nursing’s Mary M. Roberts Award for Exemplary Historical Research and Writing! The Routledge Handbook on the Global History of Nursing brings together leading scholars and scholarship to capture the state of the art and science of nursing history, as a generation of researchers turn to the history of nursing with new paradigms and methodological tools. Inviting readers to consider new understandings of the historical work and worth of nursing in a larger global context, this ground-breaking volume illuminates how research into the history of nursing moves us away from a reductionist focus on diseases and treatments and towards more inclusive ideas about the experiences of illnesses on individuals, families, communities, voluntary organizations, and states at the bedside and across the globe. An extended introduction by the editors provides an overview and analyzes the key themes involved in the transmission of ideas about the care of the sick. Organized into four parts, and addressing nursing around the globe, it covers: New directions in the history of nursing; New methodological approaches; The politics of nursing knowledge; Nursing and its relationship to social practice. Exploring themes of people, practice, politics and places, this cutting edge volume brings together the best of nursing history scholarship, and is a vital reference for all researchers in the field, and is also relevant to those studying on nursing history and health policy courses.
This book presents a new examination of Victorian nurses which challenges commonly-held assumptions about their character and motivation. Nineteenth century nursing history has, until now, concentrated almost exclusively on nurse leaders, on the development of nursing as a profession and the politics surrounding registration. This emphasis on big themes, and reliance on the writings of nursing’s upper stratum, has resulted in nursing history being littered with stereotypes. This book is one of the first attempts to understand, in detail, the true nature of Victorian nursing at ground level. Uniquely, the study views nursing through an economic lens, as opposed to the more usual vocational focus. Nursing is placed in the wider context of women’s role in British society, and the changing prospects for female employment in the high Victorian period. Using St George’s Hospital, London as a case study, the book explores the evolution of nurse recruitment, training, conditions of employment and career development in the second half of the nineteenth century. Pioneering prosopographical techniques, which combined archival material with census data to create a database of named nurses, have enabled the generation – for the first time – of biographies of ordinary nurses. Sue Hawkins’ findings belie the picture of nursing as a profession dominated by middle class women. Nursing was a melting pot of social classes, with promotion and opportunity extended to all women on the basis of merit alone. This pioneering work will interest students and researchers in nursing history, the social and cultural history of Victorian England and women’s studies.
Nursing Before Nightingale is a study of the transformation of nursing in England from the beginning of the nineteenth century until the emergence of the Nightingale nurse as the standard model in the 1890s. From the nineteenth century on historians have considered Florence Nightingale, with her training school established at St. Thomas's Hospital in 1860, the founder of modern nursing. This book investigates two major earlier reforms in nursing: a doctor-driven reform which came to be called the 'ward system,' and the reforms of the Anglican Sisters, known as the 'central system' of nursing. Rather than being the beginning of nursing reform, Nightingale nursing was the culmination of these two earlier reforms. Recent historians of nursing have ascribed the nineteenth century makeover of nursing to two causes: medicalization by hospital doctors who found the old independent nurse practitioners a threat, and the inculcation of middle class values by philanthropists. By contrast this volume demonstrates that the real cause of nursing reform was the development of the new scientific medicine which emphasized supportive therapeutics and, as a result, became heavily dependent on skilled nursing for successful implementation of these treatments. The pre-industrial work ethic of the old hospital nurses could not meet the requirements of the new medicine. Recruitment and retention of working-class persons was also extremely difficult because nursing in the early nineteenth century formed the lowest rung of the occupation of domestic service and was a job of last resort. It was still more difficult to recruit educated women or 'ladies.' There were intricate interactions between the requirements of clinical nursing under hospital medicine's new regime on the one hand, and on the other, the contemporary ideal of a lady, class structure, economic realities, the reformation of manners, and the detrimental impact of violent denominational controversies in a very religious society. This book, therefore, will be of great value to those studying the history of medicine, labour, religion, gender studies and the rise of a respectable society in the nineteenth century.
Florence Nightingale: An Introduction to Her Life and Family introduces the Collected Works by giving an overview of Nightingale’s life and the faith that guided it and by outlining the main social reform concerns on which she worked from her “call to service’’ at age sixteen to old age. This volume reports correspondence (selected from the thousands of surviving letters) with her mother, father and sister and a wide extended family. There is material on Nightingale’s “domestic arrangements,’’ from recipes, cat care and relations with servants to her contributions to charities, church and social reform causes. Much new and original material comes to light, and a remarkably different portrait of Nightingale, one with a more nuanced view of her family relationships, emerges. The Series In the Collected Works of Florence Nightingale all the surviving writing of Florence Nightingale will be published, much of it for the first time. Known as the heroine of the Crimean War and the major founder of the modern profession of nursing, Florence Nightingale (1820-1910) will be revealed also as a scholar, theorist and social reformer of enormous scope and importance. Original material has been obtained from over 150 archives and private collections worldwide. This abundance of material will be reflected in the series, revealing a significant amount of new material on her philosophy, theology and personal spiritual journey, as well as on her vision of a public health care system, her activism to achieve the difficult early steps of nursing for the sick poor in workhouse infirmaries and her views on health promotion and women’s control over midwifery. Nightingale’s more than forty years of work for public health in India, particularly in famine prevention and for broader social reform, will be reported in detail. The Collected Works of Florence Nightingale demonstrates Nightingale’s astute use of the political process and reports on her extensive correspondence with royalty, viceroys, cabinet ministers and international leaders, including such notables as Queen Victoria and W. E. Gladstone. Much new material on Nightingale’s family is reported, including some that will challenge her standard portrayal in the secondary literature. Sixteen printed volumes are scheduled and will record her enormous and largely unpublished correspondence, previously published books, articles and pamphlets, many of which have long been out of print. There will be full publication in electronic form, permitting readers to easily pursue their particular interests. Extensive databases, notably a chronology and a names index, will also be published in electronic form, again permitting convenient access to persons interested not only in Nightingale but in other figures of the time.
"This is a comprehensive resource for anyone interested in integrating gaming and simulation into a course or the entire curricula. It presents the theory and the associated practical application. The extensive reference list and resource/product list encourage and support readers with implementation." Score: 98, 5 Stars.--Doody's Medical Reviews "Game-Based Teaching and Simulation in Nursing and Healthcare is a timely, exhaustive look at how emerging technologies are transforming clinical education. Anyone looking for firsthand, direct account of how game-based learning technologies are reshaping clinical practice needs this book." Kurt Squire, PhD Associate Professor Games+Learning+Society [GLS] School of Education University Of Wisconsin - Madison This innovative text provides practical strategies for developing, integrating, and evaluating new and emerging technology, specifically game-based learning methods, useful in nursing and clinical health sciences education. The text draws upon existing models of experiential learning such as Benner's "thinking-in-action" and "novice-to-expert" frameworks, and introduces current theories supporting the phenomenon of the created learning environment. Chapters explain how simulation and game-based learning strategies can be designed, implemented, and evaluated to improve clinical educational thinking and outcomes and increase exposure to critical experiences to inform clinicians during the journey from novice to expert. The text also describes how game-based learning methods can support the development of complex decision-making and critical thinking skills. Case studies throughout demonstrate the practical application of harnessing technology as a teaching/learning device. Key Features: Provides strategies for developing, integrating, and evaluating game-based learning methods for nursing and healthcare educators Prepares teachers for the paradigm shift from static "e-learning" to dynamic distance experiential learning in virtual and game-based environments Illustrates how to integrate game-based learning into existing curricula Offers theoretical and practical examples of how game-based learning technologies can be used in nursing and clinical education
This well researched book provides an interesting study of the development of fever hospitals and fever nursing, mainly in nineteenth and twentieth century Britain. It provides new insights into the development of nursing roles and nurse education and looks at the lives of key figures at that time. The text examines how this once important branch of the nursing profession emerged in the nineteenth century, only to be discarded in the second half of the following century. Drawing on the work of Goffman and Foucault, the study shows how, aided by medical advances, fever nurses transformed their custodial duties into a therapeutic role and how training schemes were implemented to improve the recruitment and retention of nurses. As standards of living improved and patient’s chances of recovery increased, many fever hospitals became redundant and fever nurses were no longer required. The wisdom of creating fever hospitals and then disbanding them is questioned in the light of changing disease patterns, international travel and the threat posed by biological warfare.
This title is directed primarily towards health care professionals outside of the United States. It is written specifically to meet the needs of nursing students undertaking the common foundation programme. It aims to explain how and why sensitive, holistic and evidence-based nursing care is carried out. Therefore it is relevant to students who will enter all branches of nursing and includes material that is both common to all and specific to each branch. The book aims to provide all students on foundation nursing and health care programmes with material of sufficient depth/breadth to achieve the NMC outcomes required for entry into the branch programmes. There is an emphasis not only on the theory that underpins nursing practice in the common foundation programme but also on nursing skills which form an increasingly emphasized part of the programme. The chapters have been reviewed by experts from each branch and also clinical skills to ensure the content reflects each branch accurately and appropriately. Emphasis on clinical skills & lifelong learning Realistic scenarios reinforce the need for patient/client-centred care with a holistic approach Activity boxes for all branches and age groups in each chapter ensure relevance to nurses in diverse settings An integrated approach to health promotion with activity boxes emphasises that health maintenance and promotion are central to contemporary nursing practice Reflection, critical thinking and research/appraisal skills are encouraged with a problem centred approach that will help to develop the skills needed to provide sensitive and effective, high quality care and to integrate theory with practice The emphasis on nursing/clinical skills underlines the importance of core skills - an integral part of the patient/client experience Cultural diversity is a core theme throughout The importance of evidence-based practice is highlighted and the text helps readers are assisted to acquire the skills to provide evidence-based care A wide range of general and branch-specific interactive boxes help to develop an understanding of some issues in other branches as well as the core issues that affect all nurses. Self- test questions and answers provide an opportunity for readers to take responsibility for and check their learning. Valuable learning tools are included: glossary of key terms, useful websites and references
Winner of the 2008 AJN Book of the Year Award! Named an Outstanding Academic Title for 2008 byChoice! "This well written and well edited book fills a unique gap....[one of the] precious few [books] that focus on science or medicine and [one of] even fewer that cover the history of nursing."(Three Stars)--Doody's Book Review Service While there have been many research texts in the nursing literature, and nursing history is both taught in courses and of popular interest to practicing nurses, there has never been a hands-on text that describes the process of doing historical research in nursing. This book, contributed by well-known and respected nurse historians, provides the necessary direction, guidance, and examples needed to conduct historical research. It covers such topics as historiography, biographical research, using artifacts in historical research, doing archival and other data searches, doing international historical research, and locating funding sources for historical research. Case studies will be used throughout to illustrate various methods and describe how, why, when, and where historical research is used in nursing. Features of this edition: Provides direction and tools for conducting historical research Describes types of research, including biographical and oral histories Covers frameworks used to study historical events, such as social, political, feminist, intellectual, and cultural Addresses contemporary issues such as preserving and storing digitalized and tape-recorded data and obtaining institutional review board (IRB) approval for research, and addressing ethical and legal issues in historical research Includes case studies that provide a "how-to" guide to conducting research
With expanded coverage of Fleck and a new section on 'Transformations of the Medical Profession', this updated Third Edition provides students with a sociologically-focussed and theoretically informed introduction
Nurses and midwives, both qualified and in training, have a lively interest in how their professions have developed. A stimulating collection of research-based essays, this book explores and compares the distinct histories of nursing and midwifery in Britain from the beginning of the eighteenth century to the modern day.
Contexts of Nursing 3e builds on the strengths of previous editions and continues to provide nursing students with comprehensive coverage of core ideas and perspectives underpinning the practice of nursing. The new edition has been thoroughly revised and updated. New material on Cultural Awareness and Contemporary Approaches in Nursing has been introduced to reflect the realities of practice. Nursing themes are discussed from an Australian and New Zealand perspective and are supported by illustrated examples and evidence. Each chapter focuses on an area of study within the undergraduate nursing program and the new edition continues its discussions on history, culture, ethics, law, technology, and professional issues within the field of nursing. update and revised with strong contributions from a wide range of experienced educators from around Australia & New Zealand new Chapter 17 Becoming a Nurse Leader has been introduced into the third edition to highlight the ongoing need of management in practice Chapter 20 Cultural Awareness Nurses working with indigenous people is a new chapter which explores cultural awareness, safety and competence Chapter 22 Using informatics to expand awareness engages the reader on the benefits of using technology evidence-based approach is integrated throughout the text learning objectives, key words and reflective questions are included in all chapters
This book helps LPN/LVN students make the transition from nursing students to nursing professionals. By providing an overview of nursing leadership and management in today's changing health care delivery system, students develop the personal characteristics, traits and qualities of effective nurses. Supplements Instructor's Manual 0-7668-2276-1
"What Mukherjee attempts, and succeeds in doing, is to offer what many students -- undergraduates as well as students of medicine, nursing, and public health -- have long clamored for: a primer not only of recent developments in global health, but also a patient dissection of what has worked less well (and what hasn't worked at all)." --Paul Farmer, from the foreword The field of global health has roots in the AIDS pandemic of the late 20th century, when the installation of health care systems supplanted older, low-cost prevention programs to help stem the spread of HIV in low- and middle-income Africa. Today's global health is rooted the belief that health care is a human right, and that by promoting health we can cultivate equity and social justice in places where such values aren't always found. An Introduction to Global Health Delivery is a short but immersive introduction to global health's origins, actors, interventions, and challenges. Informed by physician Joia Mukherjee's quarter-century of experience fighting disease and poverty in more than a dozen countries, it delivers a clear-eyed overview of the movement underway to reduce global health disparities and establish sustainable access to care, including details of what has worked so far -- and what hasn't. Grounded in the historical and social factors that propagate health disparities and enriched with case studies and exercises that encourage readers to think critically about the subject matter, this text is the essential starting point for readers of any background seeking a practical grounding in global health's promise and progress.
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