Originally published: Thrupp, Stroud, Gloucestershire: Sutton Pub. Ltd.; London: Society of Genealogists, 1997. 2nd ed. published in Great Britain in 2004.
Ancestral trails
Hans Greve (1851-1925)--son of Johan Heinrich Greve and Wiebke Greve-- immigrated from Kropp, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany to Clinton, Clinton County, Iowa and married Catharina Mathilda Jens in 1874. Descendants and relatives lived in Iowa, Illinois, Michigan, Nevada, California and elsewhere. Includes some ancestry in Germany.
"Harry Potter," "Lord of the Rings," "Lion, Witch & the Wardrobe" Looking for something else TOTALLY UNIQUE" to read? Let your mind run riot with this Epic Trilogy of Myths, Magic and Monsters stories. Now out in Kindle and Printed Book Format. The Ancestral Trail Trilogy has it all and guarantees that "different story" without even a Dragon, or a Werewolf anywhere in sight. The Ancestral Trail was first published in beautifully pictured set of magazine format in 1993. (The complete readable history on the same stories and also shows those fantastic drawings - Google www.theancestraltrail.com). The three books in the trilogy are: - 1) Long Ago & Far Away (Ancient World) 2) New Time & Time Again (Cyber World) 3) Once Upon a Time & Time Again (Today World) The Ancestral Trail Trilogy is the proper book of the first set of stories in a three-book format now being published. It tells the story of a boy that is suddenly plucked from his home world and sent to a new place, known as the Ancestral World. There, he learns that he is The Chosen One, appointed to save this world of mythical beasts from a great evil being known simply as The Evil One. A pig-like soldier and an intellectual waif-like female scribe throughout the journey ably accompany the boy to the first of three totally different worlds, the Ancient World, Cyber World and Modern Day World of Today Said Evil One has already conquered the Ancestral World by stealing six pods from the "Tree Of Life" and imprisoning six Ancestral Guardians. Since the beginning of time, creatures of the air, land and water have lived in peace in the Ancestral World. Landsmen, common beasts, birds and fishes have dwelt in harmony with insects, reptiles and mythical beasts. Ruled with fairness and wisdom by the Council of Guardians, they have known neither suffering nor the ravages of war. Now an evil spirit has come to this land and is laying waste to all that is good. The Forces of Evil have gained ground fast and many of these peaceful creatures have been killed or have fallen under the Evil One's power. The Life Force of the Ancestral World is almost at an end.
The new edition of the essential family history title: the only exhaustive guide to The National Archives holdings.
A beautiful debut novel set in the Outer Hebrides, The House Between Tides strips back layers of the past to reveal a dark mystery. In the present day, Hetty Deveraux returns to the family home of Muirlan House on a remote Hebridean island estate following the untimely death of her parents. Torn between selling the house and turning it into a hotel, Hetty undertakes urgent repairs, accidentally uncovering human remains. Who has been lying beneath the floorboards for a century? Were they murdered? Through diaries and letters she finds, Hetty discovers that the house was occupied at the turn of the century by distant relative Beatrice Blake, a young aristocratic woman recently married to renowned naturalist and painter, Theodore Blake. With socialist and suffragist leanings Beatrice is soon in conflict with her autocratic new husband, who is distant, and wrapped up in Cameron, a young man from the island. As Beatrice is also drawn to Cameron, life for them becomes dangerous, sparking a chain of events that will change many lives, leaving Hetty to assemble the jigsaw of clues piece by piece one hundred years later, as she obsessively chases the truth. In The House Between Tides, author Sarah Maine uses her skills as a storyteller to create an utterly compelling historical mystery set in a haunting and beautifully evoked location. 'Last night, debut author Maine dreamed of a contemporary spin on classic Gothic tropes. Orphan Hetty Deveraux has inherited a crumbling, wind-battered mansion on a remote Muirland Island in western Scotland, "on the edge of the world." The day she arrives to inspect her new property, however, local assessor James Cameron has found a skeleton beneath the floorboards. Who is it, and how long has it been there? Abandoned since the war, the house was the refuge of Theo Blake, a Turner-esque painter-turned-mad recluse and a distant relative of Hetty's. At loose ends since the deaths of her parents, Hetty hopes restoring the house will serve as a new beginning. Meanwhile, in 1910, Theo Blake brings his new bride to Muirland House, whose landscapes have inspired some of his most famous paintings. Maine skillfully balances a Daphne du Maurier atmosphere with a Barbara Vine-like psychological mystery as she guides the reader back and forth on these storylines. The two narrative threads are united by the theme of conservation versus exploitation: Muirland is a habitat for several species of rare birds, threatened in the 1910 plot by Blake's determination to kill and mount them for his collection and in the 2010 story by Hetty's half-formed plans to transform Muirland House into a luxury hotel. Local man Cameron wants to see the island preserved as "a precious place, wild and unspoiled, a sanctuary for more than just the birds." The setting emerges as the strongest personality in this compelling story, evoking passion in the characters as fierce as the storms which always lurk on the horizon. A debut historical thriller which deftly blends classic suspense with modern themes.' Kirkus 'Muirlan Island in Scotland's Outer Hebrides provides the sensuous setting for British author Maine's impressive debut, which charts the parallel quests of two women a century apart. [...] Vivid descriptions of the island's landscape and weather enhance this beautifully crafted novel.' Publisher's Weekly 'There is an echo of Daphne du Maurier's Rebeca in Sarah Maine's appealing debut noel, when human remains are found beneath the floorboards of a derelict mansion on a Scottish island... a highly readable debut.' Independent 'A tremendous accomplishment. So assured, so well-judged, and with such an involving story to tell, this might be the author's fifth or sixth novel, not her first. A literary star is born!' Ronald Frame, author of The Lantern Bearers and Havisham
Offers advice on conducting genealogical research on the Internet through e-mail, mailing lists and newsgroups, and the World Wide Web
In the heart of Australia, on the cracked red earth, among wild vegetation, weathered bush, and dried-up creeks, hundreds of invisible pathways exist that become entangled on the earth's surface, underground, and in the sky, clouds, and wind. The Aboriginal people call them Jukurrpa: “the Dreamings.” This web is the Warlpiri land. Practicing the Dreaming, by ritual art, is for the Warlpiri a way to reactivate their ancestral traditions to connect with the cosmos and respond to current social and political issues. In 1979, anthropologist Barbara Glowczewski embarked on a journey to study the Warlpiri in the Australian outback. Struggling at once to maintain their traditions and cultural heritage as well as adapting to the continuing secularization and techno-progress of their European Australian counterparts, she takes us into the landscape, artistic rituals, and turmoil of the Warlpiri over three decades. Becoming accepted among Aboriginal families as a translator, and at the same time a negotiator of two vastly different visions of the earth, contemporary Western culture and the ancient indigenous dreaming culture, Glowczewski created a singular document of ethnological fieldwork and of self-transformation and discovery.
This book is the ideal companion for anybody researching their family tree. It provides advice and inspiration on methods and problem-solving and helps the amateur family historian understand what successful professionals do to get results, and why we should copy them. Over ten chapters, it examines the various themes that affect the success or failure of all genealogy research. This begins with an overview of common challenges genealogists encounter and continues with an examination of how to both search effectively and find the right documentary sources. Using examples from her own family history as well as client work, teacher and professional genealogist Helen Osborn demonstrates how to get the most from documents, analyse problems and build research plans. These subjects lead on to recording results, how to ensure relationships are correctly proved, organizing information and presenting your findings. This book will be particularly valuable to anyone who is stuck with their research, in addition to those who are keen to learn about advanced skills and methods used by genealogists.
Tamil Nadu, southern India, 1765. Maya plays among the towering granite temples in the ancient city of Tanjore. Like her mother before her, she is destined to become a devadasi, a dancer for the temple. On the day of her initiation, a stranger arrives in town. Walter Sutcliffe, a black-frocked clergyman, strives to offer moral guidance to the British troops stationed in Tanjore, but is beset by his own demons. When the British tear apart her princely kingdom, Maya heads to the steamy port city of Madras, where Thomas Pearce, an ambitious young Englishman, is entranced from the moment he first sees her. The Pagoda Tree takes us deep into the heart of a country struggling under brutal occupation. As East and West collide, Walter Sutcliffe unknowingly plays the decisive card in Maya's destiny.
The night I’m released from prison, she’s in my bed. It’s been eight years since I touched a woman, and the Native American beauty is half-dressed, beaten, bruised, and devastatingly exquisite. We’re toxic together, but we want the same things. Blood. Vengeance. Violent relief in a warm body. Beneath her touch, I’m alive. Against her skin, I’m redeemed. Buried inside her, I forget the past. Until the past takes her from me. Prison made me cold, but losing Raina makes me cruel. Ruthless. Unforgiving. I killed before. For her, I’ll kill again. I’ll end this once and for all or die in my boots. TRAILS OF SIN series (HEAs with no cliffhangers - must be read in order): Knotted #1 - Jake and Conor Buckled #2 - Jarret and Maybe Booted #3 - Lorne and Raina Contains: dark cowboy, alpha, dark romance, dominance, country music, western, Oklahoma, rural, small town, ranch, contemporary romance, suspense, murder, abuse, musician, guitar, enemies to lovers, country boy, ex-convict, prison
An exuberant, hands-on fly-on-the-wall account that combines the thrill of canyoneering and rock climbing with the intellectual sleuthing of archaeology to explore the Anasazi. David Roberts describes the culture of the Anasazi—the name means “enemy ancestors” in Navajo—who once inhabited the Colorado Plateau and whose modern descendants are the Hopi Indians of Arizona. Archaeologists, Roberts writes, have been puzzling over the Anasazi for more than a century, trying to determine the environmental and cultural stresses that caused their society to collapse 700 years ago. He guides us through controversies in the historical record, among them the haunting question of whether the Anasazi committed acts of cannibalism. Roberts’s book is full of up-to-date thinking on the culture of the ancient people who lived in the harsh desert country of the Southwest.

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