At the beginning of the 1995 football season, Hans van der Meer set out to take a series of football photographs that avoided the clichéd traditions of modern sports photography. In an attempt to record the game in its original form--a field, two goals and 22 players--he sought matches at the bottom end of the amateur leagues, the opposite end of the scale to the Champions' League. And he avoided the enclosed environment of the stadium and tight telescopic details and hyperbole of action photography. Preferring neutral lighting, framing and camera angles, he chose instead to pull back from the central subject of the pitch, locating the playing field and its unfolding action within a specific landscape and context. He was heavily influenced by the old tradition of photography in which a wide view of the action often resulted in elements of the locality being present in the image. Van der Meer began by focusing on sites within the Netherlands and in 1998 he published Dutch Fields, followed by a DVD, Flemish Fields, in 2000. His European odyssey has since taken him from small towns in the remote regions of Europe--from Bihariain in Romania to Björkö in Sweden, from Torp in Norway to Alcsóörs in Hungary, from Bartkowo in Poland to Beire in Portugal--and to the fringes of the major conurbations of Greece, Finland, England, France, Germany, Scotland, Switzerland, Holland, Slovakia, Denmark, Ireland, Wales, the Czech Republic, Belgium, Spain and Italy. These acute and subtle observations of the poetry and absurdity of human behavior connect the game of football to the basic futility of the human condition. The small tragicomedies are dwarfed by the serenity and permanence of the natural or manmade world that surrounds them but in their pathos can be found the original passion and humanity of the game.
Die Entdeckung des völlig im Verborgenen entstandenen Werks der 2009 im Alter von 83 Jahren verstorbenen Vivian Maier ist eine photohistorische Sensation. Aus Frankreich stammend, verdiente Vivian Maier ihren Lebensunterhalt in den 50er und 60er Jahren als Kindermädchen in Chicago und New York. Auf eigene Rechnung und Gefahr und außerhalb jeder Öffentlichkeit führte sie eine Art Doppelleben als Street Photographer. Ihr Entdecker John Maloof legt ihr Werk in unserem Buch erstmals einer staunenden internationalen Öffentlichkeit vor. Einige der Photographien wurden kürzlich in Deutschland in der Galerie von Hilaneh von Kories in Hamburg gezeigt.
Cold War Kids bassist and visual artist Maust and wordsmith Maziar collaborate to offer a book that's a guided tour through places they've been, both actual and abstract.
What a sketch is for the painter is a Polaroid for the photographer, namely the first formulation of a concept, the raw material of the imagination, as it were. When Helmut Newton published a selection of his Polaroids in Pola Woman in 1992, the subculture called it a stroke of genius. It was the first time that the master let people look directly over his shoulder. We became witnesses to the magic and often intense process by which erotic fantasies become finished images; the preliminary stages of a perfectly styled Newton photograph. It is remarkable, if not astonishing, that even this "raw material" possesses very original qualities and a charm of its own.
In the Face of History brings together 22 photographers whose work is rooted in a sense of time and place, and who collectively map out a century of European experience. Some are caught up in moments of epic conflict, while others reflect subtler currents of social change. Intensely personal chronicles of community, family and love sit alongside, and at times overlap with, documents of historical record. The images range from the trenches of the First World War to the Jewish ghetto of Lodz; from the Paris of Atget, Brassai and Doisneau to the Berlin of Michael Schmidt and Wolfgang Tillmans; and from cities and suburbs to tiny villages. They document a vast range of experience, but all are distinguished by the photographers' compulsion to record the world as they find it, a world refracted through the prism of their own experience. Often uplifting, sometimes shocking, In the Face of History depicts a past that is fundamentally a part of our present, and in doing so provides a moving new take on what it means to be European.
Café Lehmitz, a beer joint at the Reeperbahn, was a meeting point for many who worked in Hamburg's red-light district: prostitutes, pimps, transvestites, workers, and petty criminals. Anders Petersen was 18 years old when he first visited Hamburg in 1962, chanced upon Cafe Lehmitz, and established friends that made an impact on his life. In 1968 he returned to Lehmitz, found new "regulars," renewed contact, and began to take pictures. His photographs, which we first published in book form in 1978, have become classics of their genre--Tom Waits used our cover picture for his LP Raindogs. Their candidness and authenticity continue to move the viewer. The solidarity evident in them prevents voyeurism or false pity arising vis-a-vis a milieu generally referred to as "asocial." The "other" world of Cafe Lehmitz, which no longer exists in this form, becomes visible as a lively community with its own self-image and dignity.

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