"Lucid and well-researched." --The New Yorker In order to win the famous battle of New Orleans, Andrew Jackson believed that it was necessary to declare martial law and suspend the writ of habeas corpus. In doing so, he achieved both a great victory and the notoriety of being the first American general to ever suspend civil liberties in America. Andrew Jackson and the Politics of Martial Law tells the history of Jackson's use of martial law and how the controversy surrounding it followed him throughout his life. The work engages the age-old controversy over if, when, and who should be able to subvert the Constitution during times of national emergency. It also engages the continuing historical controversy over Jackson's political prowess and the importance of the rise of party politics during the early republic. As such, the book contributes to both the scholarship on Jackson and the legal and constitutional history of the intersection between the military and civilian spheres. To fully understand the history of martial law and the subsequent evolution of a theory of emergency powers, Matthew Warshauer asserts, one must also understand the political history surrounding the discussion of civil liberties and how Jackson's stature as a political figure and his expertise as a politician influenced such debates. Warshauer further explains that Abraham Lincoln cited Jackson's use of the military and suspension of civil liberties as justification for similar decisions during the Civil War. During both Jackson's and Lincoln's use of martial law, critics declared that such an action stood in opposition to both the Constitution and the nation's cherished republican principles of protecting liberty from dangerous power, especially that of the military. Supporters of martial law insisted that saving the nation became the preeminent cause when the republic was endangered. At the heart of such arguments lurked the partisan maneuvering of opposing political parties. Andrew Jackson and the Politics of Martial Law is a powerful examination of the history of martial law, its first use in the United States, and the consequent development of emergency powers for both military commanders and presidents. Matthew Warshauer is associate professor of history at Central Connecticut State University. He is the author of the forthcoming Andrew Jackson: First Men, America's Presidents. His articles have appeared in Tennessee Historical Quarterly, Connecticut History, Louisiana History, and New York History.
John M. Collins presents the first comprehensive history of martial law in the early modern period. He argues that rather than being a state of exception from law, martial law was understood and practiced as one of the King's laws. Further, it was a vital component of both England's domestic and imperial legal order. It was used to quell rebellions during the Reformation, to subdue Ireland, to regulate English plantations like Jamestown, to punish spies and traitors in the English Civil War, and to build forts on Jamaica. Through outlining the history of martial law, Collins reinterprets English legal culture as dynamic, politicized, and creative, where jurists were inspired by past practices to generate new law rather than being restrained by it. This work asks that legal history once again be re-integrated into the cultural and political histories of early modern England and its empire.
Die seit 1971 wieder erscheinende, interdisziplinäre, internationale Rezensionsbibliographie IBR ist eine einmalige Informationsquelle. Die Datenbank weist über 1,1 Millionen vornehmlich die Geistes- und Sozialwissenschaften berücksichtigende Buchrezensionen in 6.000 vorwiegend europäischen wissenschaftlichen Zeitschriften nach. 60.000 Eintragungen kommen jedes Jahr hinzu, bieten dem Benutzer Daten zum rezensierten Werk und zur Rezension.
The War of 1812 is etched into American memory with the burning of the Capitol and the White House by British forces, The Star-Spangled Banner, and the decisive naval battle of New Orleans. Now a respected British military historian offers an international perspective on the conflict to better gauge its significance. In The War of 1812 in the Age of Napoleon, Jeremy Black provides a dramatic account of the war framed within a wider political and economic context than most American historians have previously considered. In his examination of events both diplomatic and military, Black especially focuses on the actions of the British, for whom the conflict was, he argues, a mere distraction from the Napoleonic War in Europe. Black describes parallels and contrasts to other military operations throughout the world. He stresses the domestic and international links between politics and military conflict; in particular, he describes how American political unease about a powerful executive and strong army undermined U.S. military efforts. He also offers new insights into the war in the West, amphibious operations, the effects of the British blockade, and how the conflict fit into British global strategy. For those who think the War of 1812 is a closed book, this volume brims with observations and insights that better situate this “American” war on the international stage.
Connecticut in the American Civil War offers readers a remarkable window into the state’s involvement in a conflict that challenged and defined the unity of a nation. The arc of the war is traced through the many facets and stories of battlefield, home front, and factory. Matthew Warshauer masterfully reveals the varied attitudes toward slavery and race before, during, and after the war; Connecticut’s reaction to the firing on Fort Sumter; the dissent in the state over whether or not the sword and musket should be raised against the South; the raising of troops; the sacrifice of those who served on the front and at home; and the need for closure after the war. This book is a concise, amazing account of a complex and troubling war. No one interested in this period of American history can afford to miss reading this important contribution to our national and local stories. The paperback edition includes a reading guide, which is also available at http://www.wesleyan.edu/wespress/e-books/materials/warshauer_reading_guide.pdf
For over a century historians have been unable to agree about Andrew Jackson. Was he as Robert Remini has insisted for more than forty years a masterful politician who shaped the modern presidency and ushered in an era of new democratic politics? Or was he, as James C. Curtis and Andrew Burstein have argued, a loose cannon who possessed no vision for the American republic? What historians do not doubt is Jackson's significant and lasting impact on American politics and the nation. To fully assess his role and legacy, one must explore the interaction between his personal and political motivations and the larger developments of the early republic and antebellum period. In Andrew Jackson in Context, Matthew Warshauer, Professor of History at Central Connecticut State University and author of Andrew Jackson and the Politics of Martial Law, offers a detailed look at differing historians' views on Jackson and places these perspectives within an accessible biography of the seventh president. Warshauer insists that any study of Jackson must place him within the context of his time and that his motivations regarding such pivotal issues as economics and the preservation of the Union cannot be divorced from the very real and turbulent politics of the Jacksonian period. The author discounts the psychological driven theories of authors like Curtis and Burstein, though recognises that Jackson was often a vain, blustering, power-driven man who when he deemed it necessary had no qualms about violating the Constitution. This is an engaging, well-written biography that is perfect for students and those who want to understand not only Jackson and his era, but what historians have written about him.
Literary Thoughts edition presents The Gilded Age by Mark Twain ------ The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today is an 1873 novel by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner that satirizes greed and political corruption in post-Civil War America in the era now referred to as the Gilded Age. It is the only novel Twain wrote with a collaborator, and its title very quickly became synonymous with graft, materialism, and corruption in public life. All books of the Literary Thoughts edition have been transscribed from original prints and edited for better reading experience. Please visit our homepage www.literarythoughts.com to see our other publications.
Im November 1959 wird in Holcomb, Kansas, die vierköpfige Familie Clutter brutal ermordet. Wenige Wochen später werden die Täter Dick Hickock und Perry Smith auf der Flucht geschnappt. Truman Capote erfährt aus der New York Times von dem Verbrechen und beschließt, am Tatort zu recherchieren. Er spricht mit Bekannten und Freunden der Familie, mit der Polizei. Schließlich erhält er Gelegenheit, mit den beiden Mördern zu reden. Mit der Zeit gelingt es ihm, so viel Nähe zu ihnen herzustellen, dass sie ihm präzise Innenansichten ihrer Seele erlauben. Fast sechs Jahre nach ihrer Tat begleitet er sie bis an den Galgen. Capotes herausragende Rekonstruktion eines Mordes wurde eine Sensation und begründete ein neues literarisches Genre: die "non-fiction novel", den Tatsachenroman. In einer atemberaubenden Sprache erzählt er, wie aus Menschen Mörder werden. Mit Kaltblütig landete Capote einen internationalen Bestseller.

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