Aristotle regarded law and education as the two fundamental and deeply interdependent tools of political art, making the use of education by the statesman a topic of the first importance in his practical philosophy. The present work develops the first comprehensive treatment of this neglected topic, and assesses the importance of Aristotle's defense of public education for current debates about school choice and privatization, and educational equality.
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Aristotle on EducationBy John Burnet
Aristotle on Teaching examines teaching in general, and analyzes the objects, procedures, and order found in all student learning, furnishing the guidelines for the culminating section on the inductive and deductive procedures underlying all teaching. It explores Aristotle's doctrine to discover its relevance for the art of teaching, defined as the act of explaining the truth to those being taught, through the lucid explanations of Thomas Aquinas on the writings of Aristotle. The book is divided into three sections, the first giving a general examination of the definition, purpose, materials, and procedure of teaching. It then discusses the student's natural procedure for acquiring knowledge by first treating the objects of knowledge, and then the procedure by which the student understands them. The third section examines the instructor's method of teaching, which is twofold because of the need to be patterned after the student's natural manner of acquiring knowledge.
Philosophers on Education offers us the most comprehensive available history of philosopher's views and impacts on the directions of education. As Amelie Rorty explains, in describing a history of education, we are essentially describing and gaining the clearest understanding of the issues that presently concern and divide us. The essays in this stellar collection are written by some of the finest comtemporary philosophers. Those interested in history of philosophy, epistemology, moral psychology and education, and political theory will find Philosophers on Education to be both an engaging and fascinating read.
What is education for? Should it produce workers or educate future citizens? Is there a place for faith schools - and should patriotism be taught? In this compelling and controversial book, Harry Brighouse takes on all these urgent questions and more. He argues that children share four fundamental interests: the ability to make their own judgements about what values to adopt; acquiring the skills that will enable them to become economically self-sufficient as adults; being exposed to a range of activities and experiences that will enable them to flourish in their personal lives; and developing a sense of justice. He criticises sharply those who place the interests of the economy before those of children, and assesses the arguments for and against the controversial issues of faith schools and the teaching of patriotism. Clearly argued but provocative, On Education draws on recent examples from Britain and North America as well as famous thinkers on education such as Aristotle and John Locke. It is essential reading for anyone interested in the present state of education and its future.
Aristotle regarded law and education as the two fundamental and deeply interdependent tools of political art, making the use of education by the statesman a topic of the first importance in his practical philosophy. The present work develops the first comprehensive treatment of this neglected topic, and assesses the importance of Aristotle's defense of public education for current debates about school choice and privatization, and educational equality.
Believing that transformation is possible and that it must come from within, Clar Doyle illustrates the vital connection between drama and critical pedagogy. Presuming that a practice informed by the theory of critical pedagogy is essential to achieve an emancipatory education, Doyle shows how well drama and aesthetic education can encourage a pedagogy that is critical. He explores the real as well as the perceived values and understandings given to the aesthetic in school settings, how tastes and awareness are produced and how students' backgrounds inform the way in which art and drama are experienced. Furthermore, Doyle shows the ways in which the dominant cultural agencies rob both teachers and students of creativity through their reproductive policies. The book explores such critical questions as: the nature of culture; the historical place of drama within education; and the debate between drama and theatre as it applies to schooling. With a critical perspective, he reviews the current status of drama education and suggests ways in which educators can redefine their mission and refine their practice. By examining the influence of the culture industry and the issues surrounding style choices, Doyle highlights the challenge that teachers must meet in order to use performance skills to tease out attitudes and understandings. He concludes by showing how drama can help students, not only to bring about change in their own lives, but to effect change in the world around them.
In this unique work some of today's greatest educators present concise, accessible summaries of the great educators of the past. Covering a time-span from 500 BC to the early twentieth century each essay gives key biographical information, an outline of the individual's principal achievements and activities, an assessment of their impact and influence, a list of their major writings and suggested further reading. Together with Fifty Modern Thinkers on Education, this book provides a unique reference guide for all students of education.
This work examines Aristotle’s discussions of definition in his logical works and the Metaphysics, and argues for the importance of definitions of simple substances, drawing the connection between definitions as first principles of demonstration and as statements of essence.
The two central emotions of pride and jealousy have long been held to have no role in moral judgements, and have been a source of controversy in both ethics and moral psychology. Kristjan Kristjansson challenges this common view and argues that emotions are central to moral excellence and that both pride and jealousy are indeed ingredients of a well-rounded virtuous life.
I may not be the Jesus Christ I once fondly imagined myself, but I think I must have a talent for journalism' James Joyce's non-fictional writings address diverse issues: aesthetics, the functions of the press, censorship, Irish cultural history, England's literature and empire. This collection includes newspaper articles, reviews, lectures, and propagandizing essays that are consciously public, direct, and communicative. It covers forty years of Joyce's life and maps important changes in his opinions about politics, especially Irish politics, about the relationship of literature to history, and about writers who remained important to him such as Mangan, Blake, Defoe, Ibsen, Wilde, and Shaw. These pieces also clarify and illuminate the transformations in Joyce's fiction, from Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man to the first drafts of Ulysses. Gathering together more than fifty essays, several of which have never been available in an English edition, this volume is the most complete and the most helpfully annotated collection.
Provides a comprehensive account of the socio-political role Aristotle attributes to traditional religion, despite rejecting its content.
This second edition continues to examine the major schools of philosophy of education through the systems approach. It also considers the relationship of education to major ideologies such as Liberalism, Conservativism, and Marxism. The third section on Educational Theory analyzes the impact of philosophy and ideology on educational theory and practice by examining such theories as Essentialism, Perennialism, Progressivism, and Social Reconstructionism. Although focusing on the philosophy of education, this book provides a three-dimensional introduction to educational ideas. First, it examines the major philosophical systems and ideologies that have shaped educational thought and practice. Second, it outlines certain ideas from philosophy and ideology to illustrate how these disciplines contribute to educational theory. Third, in seeking to provide a context for educational philosophy, ideology, and theory, it includes biographical sketches of principal originators or contributors of leading ideas about education. For professionals working in the field of education.
On the Soul is also known by its Latin title De Anima or its Greek title Peri Psuchês What does it mean to be a natural living thing? Are plants and animals alive simply because of an arrangement of material parts, or does life spring from something else? In this timeless and profound inquiry, Aristotle presents a view of the psyche that avoids the simplifications both of the materialists and those who believe in the soul as something quite distinct from body. On the Soul also includes Aristotle's idiosyncratic and influential account of light and colors. On Memory and Recollection continues the investigation of some of the topics introduced in On the Soul. Sachs's fresh and jargon-free approach to the translation of Aristotle, his lively and insightful introduction, and his notes and glossaries, all bring out the continuing relevance of Aristotle's thought to biological and philosophical questions.

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