Practical information for artists trying to sell their work. Formatted in a workbook style with fill exercises and examples.
This classic guide for artists is completely revised and updated to provide an in-depth view of the legal issues facing the visual artist today and provides practical legal guidance for any visual artist involved with creative work. Among the many new topics covered in this comprehensive guide are: detailed coverage of the myriad developments in copyright (including online copyright registration procedures and use of art on the Internet); changes in laws protecting artists in artist-gallery relationships are explained in depth; scope of First Amendment protections for graffiti art and the sale of art in public spaces; detailed as well as new cases dealing with art and privacy; and a model contract for Web site design and much more. The book also covers copyrights, moral rights, contracts, licensing, sales, special risks and protections for art and artists, book publishing, video and multimedia works, leases, taxation, estate planning, museums, collecting, grants, and how to find the best professional advisers and attorneys. In addition, the book suggests basic strategies for negotiation, gives information to help with further action, contains many sample legal forms and contracts, and shows how to locate artists' groups and Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts organizations. Allworth Press, an imprint of Skyhorse Publishing, publishes a broad range of books on the visual and performing arts, with emphasis on the business of art. Our titles cover subjects such as graphic design, theater, branding, fine art, photography, interior design, writing, acting, film, how to start careers, business and legal forms, business practices, and more. While we don't aspire to publish a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are deeply committed to quality books that help creative professionals succeed and thrive. We often publish in areas overlooked by other publishers and welcome the author whose expertise can help our audience of readers.
"A guide to financial planning, budgeting, and business basics for creative professionals, artists, and nonprofit managers"--Provided by publisher.
The Artist’s Guide to Grant Writing is designed to transform readers from starving artists fumbling to get by into working artists who confidently tap into all the resources at their disposal. Written in an engaging and down-to-earth tone, this comprehensive guide includes time-tested strategies, anecdotes from successful grant writers, and tips from grant officers and fundraising specialists. The book is targeted at both professional and aspiring writers, performers, and visual artists who need concrete information about how to write winning grant applications and fundraise creatively so that they can finance their artistic dreams. From the Trade Paperback edition.
In this book, there are three paths. The whole track-from beginning to end-is a developmental sequence of information and exercises designed to ease you into writing an artist statement. The journey integrates the technical and professional levels of writing with an emotional and spiritual understanding of why you are doing this. The fast track-the technical nuts and bolts on how to write an artist statement-can be pulled together from chapters: 2, 5, 7, 9, 12, 24, 27, 28-39, and 41-44. The contemplative track-a tapestry of psychological, philosophical, and spiritual information, which relates to a range of professional and personal pursuits besides the artist statement-can be found in chapters 1, 3, 4, 6, 8, 11, 13-23, 26, 30 and 46.
Get that arts grant and be more independent! In this book, artists and arts groups will find all they need to know to support themselves through grants and special projects. This expert guide, written by an insider who has been on both the grant-making and the grant-writing side of the arts, shows readers how to assess their personal strengths and set goals to pursue their dreams. Hands-on examples and how-to exercises are provided for every situation: from creating artists’ statements, to writing letters, fellowship applications, and arts-organization applications, to being ready for that all-important site visit. Online resources, tips on portfolio and personal prep, and information about the inner workings of boards and how to handle the yes, the no, and the maybe make this the complete guide to getting that arts grant. • More than 66,000 foundations give grants—this book helps artists get them • Unique exercises from an insider, plus upbeat, positive approach • Focuses on personal preparation for applying for and getting a grant Allworth Press, an imprint of Skyhorse Publishing, publishes a broad range of books on the visual and performing arts, with emphasis on the business of art. Our titles cover subjects such as graphic design, theater, branding, fine art, photography, interior design, writing, acting, film, how to start careers, business and legal forms, business practices, and more. While we don't aspire to publish a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are deeply committed to quality books that help creative professionals succeed and thrive. We often publish in areas overlooked by other publishers and welcome the author whose expertise can help our audience of readers.
An essential handbook for students and professionals on writing eloquently, accurately, and originally about contemporary art How to Write About Contemporary Art is the definitive guide to writing engagingly about the art of our time. Invaluable for students, arts professionals and other aspiring writers, the book first navigates readers through the key elements of style and content, from the aims and structure of a piece to its tone and language. Brimming with practical tips that range across the complete spectrum of art-writing, the second part of the book is organized around its specific forms, including academic essays; press releases and news articles; texts for auction and exhibition catalogues, gallery guides and wall labels; op-ed journalism and exhibition reviews; and writing for websites and blogs. In counseling the reader against common pitfalls—such as jargon and poor structure—Gilda Williams points instead to the power of close looking and research, showing how to deploy language effectively; how to develop new ideas; and how to construct compelling texts. More than 30 illustrations throughout support closely analysed case studies of the best writing, in Source Texts by 64 authors, including Claire Bishop, Thomas Crow, T.J. Demos, Okwui Enwezor, Dave Hickey, John Kelsey, Chris Kraus, Rosalind Krauss, Stuart Morgan, Hito Steyerl, and Adam Szymczyk. Supplemented by a general bibliography, advice on the use and misuse of grammar, and tips on how to construct your own contemporary art library, How to Write About Contemporary Art is the essential handbook for all those interested in communicating about the art of today.
The definitive, must-have guide to pursuing an art career—the fully revised and updated edition of Art/Work, now in its fourteenth printing, shares the tools artists of all levels need to make it in this highly competitive field. Originally published in 2009, Art/Work was the first practical guide to address how artists can navigate the crucial business and legal aspects of a fine art career. But the rules have changed since then, due to the proliferation of social media, increasing sophistication of online platforms, and ever more affordable digital technology. Artists have never had to work so hard to distinguish themselves—including by making savvy decisions and forging their own paths. Now Heather Bhandari, with over fifteen years of experience as a director of the popular Chelsea gallery Mixed Greens, and Jonathan Melber, a former arts/entertainment lawyer and director of an art e-commerce startup, advise a new generation of artists on how to make it in the art world. In this revised and updated edition, Bhandari and Melber show artists how to tackle a host of new challenges. How do you diversify income streams to sustain a healthy art practice? How can you find an alternative to the gallery system? How do you review a license agreement? What are digital marketing best practices? Also included are new quotes from over thirty arts professionals, updated commission legal templates, organizational tips, tax information, and advice for artists who don’t make objects. An important resource for gallerists, dealers, art consultants, artist-oriented organizations, and artists alike, Art/Work is the resource that all creative entrepreneurs in the art world turn to for advice.
A collection of satirically written fictional artists statements.
"Our purpose in this handbook is to help you, the evolving artist, learn to articulate your concepts and ideas, and also to argue for and earn your place in the world of art."--Preface pg. ix.
Dorrell opened his gallery in 1991, and has been advancing artists careers on a national level ever since. This is an updated edition of his original book, covering critical subjects that he didn't before and expanding on others, written in the same honest tone. With clients such as Warner Brothers and H&R Block, Dorrell knows how to land the big deals, as well as how to win the trust of private collectors. He presents the information so that any artist can follow the steps laid out in this book, and begin assembling a career that works. With sage advice, humor, and a host of anecdotes, Dorrell keeps you engaged through each chapter. Whether instructing on how to get your work into a gallery, or how to handle self-doubt, he knows his ground. He also tells the story of his gallery?s shaky start, from his initial failures to his many successes. Having survived the Great Recession, Dorrell provides many first-hand observations on the culture of greed and corruption that brought it about, and how that relates to artists as well. Regardless of your place in the arts, you will benefit from the real-life guidance of this work.
“If the great European artists of the past were alive today, what kinds of statements would they need to write to explain and justify their work?” HuffingtonPost Arts blogger John Seed answers this question for 24 great European works of art, satirizing the language of Postmodern art writing in the process.
I Like Your Work: Art and Etiquette, with contributions from 38 artists, critics, curators, and dealers on the sometimes serious and sometimes ridiculous topic of manners in the art world.The art world is now both socially professional and professionally social. Curators visit artists' studios; collectors, dealers, and journalists assemble for a reception and reconvene later for dinner; everyone goes to parties. We exchange introductions and small talk; art is bought and sold; careers (and friendships) brighten or fade. In each situation, certain behaviors are expected while others are silently discouraged. Sometimes, what's appropriate in the real world would be catastrophic in the art world, and vice versa.Making these distinctions on the spot can be nerve-wracking and disastrous. So we asked ourselves: What is the place of etiquette in art? How do social mores establish our communities, mediate our critical discussions, and frame our experience of art? If we were to transcribe these unspoken laws, what would they look like? What happens when the rules are broken? Since we didn't have all the answers, we politely asked our friends for some help.Featuring: James Bae, Jay Batlle, Andrew Berardini, Dike Blair, Matthew Brannon, Sari Carel, Naomi Fry, Maria Elena González, Michelle Grabner, Ethan Greenbaum, Sara Greenberger Rafferty, A.S. Hamrah, Steffani Jemison, Paddy Johnson, Angie Keefer, Prem Krishnamurthy, David Levine, Pam Lins, Jason Murison, Dan Nadel, Bob Nickas, Wendy Olsoff, Dushko Petrovich, Kaspar Pincis, Richard Ryan, Jessica Slaven, Ryan Steadman, Amanda Trager, Rachel Uffner, and Roger White.
I'd Rather Be in the Studio! offers artists practical and comfortable approaches to self-promotion. The focus is on sharing the artwork directly with potential buyers through electronic and traditional communication outlets—in a manner that is comfortable, not artificial. Includes online worksheets and downloads at idratherbeinthestudio.com.
Written by a gallerist for artists, and updated in February 2017, this encouraging, easy-to-read handbook includes advice and information to help artists successfully launch or accelerate their careers. Topics include: Setting goals, networking, finding & creating exhibition opportunities, selling & pricing art, working with galleries, websites, artist statements, studio management and much more. Also included: Online resources and additional advice from over forty working artists and art dealers. Contributing Artists: Rick Araluce, Carrie Ann Baade, Ali Banisadr, Rebekah Bogard, Benjamin Britton, Mia Brownell, Charles Clary, Peter Drake, Cara Enteles, Roni Feldman, Lori Field, Eric Finzi, Camille Rose Garcia, Julie Heffernan, Seonna Hong, David Humphrey, David Kramer, Martin Kruck, Travis Louie, Marion Peck, Martha Rich, Jean-Pierre Roy, Judith Schaechter, Tony Shore, Aaron Smith, Sarah Trigg, Hanna von Goeler, Didier William and Brad Woodfin. Contributing Gallerists: Kirsten Anderson (Roq la Rue), Noah Antieau (Red Truck Gallery), William Baczek, Zach Feuer, Bert Green, Ken Harman (Spoke Art & Hashimoto Contemporary), Andrew Hosner (Thinkspace), Allegra LaViola (Sargent's Daughters), Jayme McLellan (Civilian Art Projects), Jen Rogers & Kerri Stephens (Varnish Fine Art), Billy Shire (La Luz de Jesus), Mindy Solomon, Linda Warren, Mark Wolfe, and Marcia Wood. Alix Sloan has over twenty years experience in the arts as a curator, consultant, private dealer and gallerist. She regularly shares her expertise in art school lectures and one-on-one consultations, helping artists focus their goals, create strategies and understand what it takes to build and maintain a long-term career in the arts. In this guide, Sloan makes the information every artist needs available in one accessible, straightforward guide.
Mystery of Making IT destroys all the myths learned in art school that have been passed down from generation to generation and will transform your career. Written for the seasoned pro as well as those just starting to market their art. Over a thousand artists have read this book and say it has dramatically changed their lives. Learn the secrets guarded by the professionals and find the path to your own success. Jack White has been a successful artist for over 40 years and freely shares his experience.
An invaluable reference, this book provides insights, suggestions, examples, and resources intended to demystify the arcane world of art print marketing. Barney Davey has authored this handbook of practical advice to help visual artists succeed in the print market. The book is a result of his experiences and perspective culled from advising and observing leading art publishers and print artists in three decades. It details how artists can use the print market to take control of their career and create a profitable business putting their original work into prints. The wealth of benefits for visual artists in the print market include: secondary income from reproducing originals into prints; third stream income from licensing; greater awareness for their work; growing their collector base; diversifying their pricing and portfolio and keeping pace with demand for their originals. Given these advantages, it is surprising to find other business and marketing books for artists offer scant coverage of the print market. The paucity of print market information makes the book's insider insights priceless. Any visual artist with the desire to enjoy commercial success will find this book useful, inspiring and informative.
“If John Berger’s Ways of Seeing is a classic of art criticism, looking at the ‘what’ of art, then David Salle’s How to See is the artist’s reply, a brilliant series of reflections on how artists think when they make their work. The ‘how’ of art has perhaps never been better explored.” —Salman Rushdie How does art work? How does it move us, inform us, challenge us? Internationally renowned painter David Salle’s incisive essay collection illuminates these questions by exploring the work of influential twentieth-century artists. Engaging with a wide range of Salle’s friends and contemporaries—from painters to conceptual artists such as Jeff Koons, John Baldessari, Roy Lichtenstein, and Alex Katz, among others—How to See explores not only the multilayered personalities of the artists themselves but also the distinctive character of their oeuvres. Salle writes with humor and verve, replacing the jargon of art theory with precise and evocative descriptions that help the reader develop a personal and intuitive engagement with art. The result: a master class on how to see with an artist’s eye.
This comprehensive book is informed by decades of experience and years of research into how to perform as a professional artist in the 21st century art world (or worlds). This book is filled with easy-to-follow instructions that will help you teach everything -- archiving work, start a mailing list, write a grant, and everything else you can think of. This straightforward book even addresses topics you may not think artists need to know about now! Consider this a handbook for teaching the business aspects of an art career. This book is written and designed to empower you to help artists understand the wild world of art careers. Syllabus and handouts included. Far too often artists find themselves having to compromise their art and their life because they were not taught accurate up-to-date methods for dealing with business situations. Because of this lack of preparedness artists miss out on valuable opportunities, financial rewards, and access to receptive audiences. This book aims to help teachers teach professional practices to artists everywhere, helping to avoid these pitfalls and get on the track to success on their own terms. Whether you are a gallery-bound artist, a public artist, an emerging artist, a hobbyist, a crafts-person, a student, or a seasoned artist in need of a tune up, this manual will help you train artists.
Illustrates and describes nine hundred works of art representing each of the Museum's eighteen departments

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