Vols. for 1871-76, 1913-14 include an extra number, The Christmas bookseller, separately paged and not included in the consecutive numbering of the regular series.
First published in 1986. Dubliners was James Joyce’s first major publication. Setting it at the turn of the century, Joyce claims to hold up a ‘nicely polished looking-glass’ to the native Irishman. In Backgrounds for Joyce’s Dubliners, the author examines the national, mythic, religious and legendary details, which Joyce builds up to capture a many-sided performance and timelessness in Irish life. Acknowledging the serious work done on Dubliners as a whole, in this study Professor Torchiana draws upon a wide range of published and unpublished sources to provide a scholarly and satisfying framework for Joyce’s world of the ‘inept and the lower middle class’. He combines an understanding of Joyce’s subtleties with a long-standing personal knowledge of Dublin. This title will make fascinating reading for scholars and students of Joyce’s writing as well as for those interested in early twentieth century Irish social history.
In seventeen volumes, copublished with Baylor University, this acclaimed series features annotated texts of all of Robert Browning’s known writing. The series encompasses autobiography as well as influences bearing on Browning’s life and career and aspects of Victorian thought and culture.? With this seventeenth and final volume, The Complete Works of Robert Browning concludes the major phase of a great scholarly project: the accurate preservation and transmission of the poet’s works for future generations of readers. Volume XVII begins with Browning’s last collection of poems, Asolando: Fancies and Facts, published on the day of the poet’s death, 12 December 1889. Wonderful in its diversity and intensity, Asolando contains lyrics of startling emotion, autobiographical narratives, and a few of the dramatic monologues for which Browning had become famed. Also in this final volume are ninety-nine fugitive pieces, either unpublished or uncollected during the poet’s lifetime. Ranging from experimental poems of Browning’s youth to Greek translations to joking couplets and witty ephemera, these works illustrate the endless variety of the poet’s talent. Finally, Volume XVII includes “Thomas Wentworth, Earl of Strafford,” a biographical essay that Browning coauthored with John Forster in 1836. The historical research done for this work formed a basis for Strafford, a play Browning completed the following year. Comprehensive explanatory notes for the works in this volume are provided, as is a title index to all seventeen volumes of The Complete Works.
This carefully crafted ebook: "The Ring and the Book (Unabridged)" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. The Ring and the Book is a long dramatic narrative poem, and, more specifically, a verse novel, of 21,000 lines, written by Robert Browning. It was published in four volumes from 1868 to 1869 by Smith, Elder & Co. The book tells the story of a murder trial in Rome in 1698, whereby an impoverished nobleman, Count Guido Franceschini, is found guilty of the murders of his young wife Pompilia Comparini and her parents, having suspected his wife was having an affair with a young cleric, Giuseppe Caponsacchi. Having been found guilty despite his protests and sentenced to death, Franceschini then appeals—unsuccessfully—to Pope Innocent XII to overturn the conviction. The poem comprises twelve books, nine of which are dramatic monologues spoken by a different narrator involved in the case (Count Guido speaks twice), usually giving a different account of the same events, and two books (the first and the last) spoken by the author. Robert Browning (7 May 1812 – 12 December 1889) was an English poet and playwright whose mastery of dramatic verse, especially dramatic monologues, made him one of the foremost Victorian poets.

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