Erfolgsautorin Sara Gruen («Wasser für die Elefanten») legt mit ihrem neuen New-York-Times-Bestseller eine fesselnde und ergreifende Geschichte in einem abgelegenen Dorf in den schottischen Highlands vor. «Eine bewegende Liebesgeschichte: ein schottisches Downton Abbey», urteilt Publishers Weekly. Im Januar 1945 reist die wohlhabende Maddie zusammen mit ihrem Ehemann Ellis und dessen bestem Freund in ein abgelegenes Dorf in den schottischen Highlands. Der exzentrische Ellis will die Existenz der sagenumwobenen Nessie beweisen, Krieg hin oder her. Ausgestattet mit Fernglas, Kompass und Kamera begeben sich die beiden Männer Tag für Tag auf Exkursion. Maddie bleibt allein zurück in der kargen Pension dieses fremden Ortes. Immer stärker stellt sie ihr bisheriges Leben in Frage. Wer ist sie, und was will sie? Da lernt sie die Menschen der Pension kennen, zwei Mägde und den geheimnisvollen Pensionsbesitzer Angus. Und plötzlich weitet sich ihr Blick für überraschende Möglichkeiten des Lebens ... Geballte Erzählkraft vor der atmosphärischen Kulisse von Loch Ness: eine packende Liebesgeschichte, ein mitreißendes Porträt weiblicher Emanzipation, eine Hymne auf die Kraft der Freundschaft.
The amphibious assault against a defended beach is fully explored from the perspective of the defender.
Everybody Out of the Pond At the Water's Edge will change the way you think about your place in the world. The awesome journey of life's transformation from the first microbes 4 billion years ago to Homo sapiens today is an epic that we are only now beginning to grasp. Magnificent and bizarre, it is the story of how we got here, what we left behind, and what we brought with us. We all know about evolution, but it still seems absurd that our ancestors were fish. Darwin's idea of natural selection was the key to solving generation-to-generation evolution -- microevolution -- but it could only point us toward a complete explanation, still to come, of the engines of macroevolution, the transformation of body shapes across millions of years. Now, drawing on the latest fossil discoveries and breakthrough scientific analysis, Carl Zimmer reveals how macroevolution works. Escorting us along the trail of discovery up to the current dramatic research in paleontology, ecology, genetics, and embryology, Zimmer shows how scientists today are unveiling the secrets of life that biologists struggled with two centuries ago. In this book, you will find a dazzling, brash literary talent and a rigorous scientific sensibility gracefully brought together. Carl Zimmer provides a comprehensive, lucid, and authoritative answer to the mystery of how nature actually made itself.
The water's edge, whether shore or riverbank, is a marginal territory that becomes invested with layers of meaning. The essays in this collection present intriguing perspectives on how the water's edge has been imagined and represented in different places at various times and how this process contributed to the formation of social identities. Art and Identity at the Water's Edge focuses upon national coastlines and maritime heritage; on rivers and seashore as regions of liminality and sites of conflicting identities; and on the edge as a tourist setting. Such themes are related to diverse forms of art, including painting, architecture, maps, photography, and film. Topics range from the South African seaside resort of Durban to the French Riviera. The essays explore successive ideological mappings of the Jordan River, and how Czech cubist architecture and painting shaped a new nationalist reading of the Vltava riverbanks. They examine post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans as a filmic spectacle that questions assumptions about American identity, and the coast depicted as a site of patriotism in nineteenth-century British painting. The collection demonstrates how waterside structures such as maritime museums and lighthouses, and visual images of the water's edge, have contributed to the construction of cultural and national identities.
The story of New York City that began before the first humans settled in the region twelve thousand years ago is told in a unique account of the area's geological history, a look at how the region has served as a habitat for a diversity of species, and a forecast for the potential future of the city in light of global warming.
For the last thirty years John Lister-Kaye, one of Britain's best-known nature writers, has taken the same circular walk from his home deep in a Scottish glen up to a small hill loch. Each day brings a new observation or an unexpected encounter - a fragile spider's web, an osprey struggling to lift a trout from the water or a woodcock exquisitely camouflaged on her nest - and every day, on his return home, he records his thoughts in a journal. Drawing on this lifetime of close observation, John Lister-Kaye's new book encourages us to look again at the nature around us and to discover its wildness for ourselves. It also forges wonderful connections between the most unlikely subjects, from photosynthesis and the energy cycle to Norse mythology, to weasels and perfume and to the over-population of our planet. At the Water's Edge is a lyrical hymn to the wildlife of Britain, and a powerful warning to respect and protect it.
Renowned for its historic mansions, posh resorts, and deep blue waters, Lake Geneva is a haven for Chicago's movers and shakers since the Great Fire of 1871. This guide talks about Lake Geneva, providing images and details from local residents. It features tours of lakeshore homes, engaging profiles, and insights into the local scene.
This book takes an intimate, collaborative, interdisciplinary autoethnographic approach that both emphasizes the authors’ entangled relationships with the more-than-human, and understands the land and sea-scapes of Newfoundland as integral to their thinking, theorizing, and writing. The authors draw on feminist, trans, queer, critical race, Indigenous, decolonial, and posthuman theories in order to examine the relationships between origins, memories, place, identities, bodies, pasts, and futures. The chapters address a range of concerns, among them love, memory, weather, bodies, vulnerability, fog, myth, ice, desire, hauntings, and home. Autoethnography and Feminist Theory at the Water’s Edge will be of interest to students and scholars across a range of disciplines including gender studies, cultural geography, folklore, and anthropology, as well as those working in autoethnography, life writing, and island studies.
Examines twenty Scottish golf courses along the sea, describing renowned holes, and offering tips on how to play them, with addresses, phone numbers, directions, access rules, and green fees for each course
"More than most wars in American history, the long and contentions Vietnam War had a profound effect on the home front, during the war and especially after. In At the Water's Edge, Melvin Small delivers the first study of the war's domestic politics." "Mr. Small shows that most of the military and diplomatic decisions made by Presidents Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon were heavily influenced by election cycles, relations with Congress, the state of the economy, and the polls. Although all three presidents and their advisers claimed that these decisions were made exclusively out of national security concerns, much evidence suggests otherwise. In turn, the war had a transforming impact on American society
The author recounts his experiences fishing in various parts of England, Scotland, and Wales
«Es ist unmöglich, ein Zwiegespräch mit einem Menschenaffen zu führen oder einem von ihnen aus nächster Nähe in die Augen zu blicken, ohne verändert aus der Begegnung hervorzugehen.» Sara Gruen Sam, Bonzi, Lola, Mbongo, Jelani und Makena sind keine gewöhnlichen Affen: Die Bonobos beherrschen die Gebärdensprache, sind in der Lage, mit Menschen zu kommunizieren. Für die scheue Wissenschaftlerin Isabel Duncan sind die Tiere wie eine Familie. Als eine Explosion das Labor zerstört und ihr die Affen entreißt, bricht für sie eine Welt zusammen. Der ehrgeizige Journalist John Thigpen steht vor dem Ende seiner Karriere – und vermutlich auch seiner Ehe. Zusammen mit Isabel macht er sich auf die Suche nach den verschwundenen Affen. Er ist nicht nur angetan von der attraktiven Forscherin, sondern wittert auch eine große Story. Dabei ahnt er nicht, wie sehr beides sein Leben verändern wird ... Sara Gruen ist die geborene Erzählerin und gewährt uns mit diesem Buch einen faszinierenden Einblick in die Seele von Menschenaffen – einfühlsam, packend und mit viel Sachverstand und Humor.
The Outer Banks National Scenic Byway received its designation in 2009, an act that stands as a testament to the historical and cultural importance of the communities linked along the North Carolina coast from Whalebone Junction across to Hatteras and Ocracoke Island and down to the small villages of the Core Sound region. This rich heritage guide introduces readers to the places and people that have made the route and the region a national treasure. Welcoming visitors on a journey across sounds and inlets into villages and through two national seashores, Barbara Garrity-Blake and Karen Willis Amspacher share the stories of people who have shaped their lives out of saltwater and sand. The book considers how the Outer Banks residents have stood their ground and maintained a vibrant way of life while adapting to constant change that is fundamental to life where water meets the land. Heavily illustrated with color and black-and-white photographs, Living at the Water's Edge will lead readers to the proverbial porch of the Outer Banks locals, extending a warm welcome to visitors while encouraging them to understand what many never see or hear: the stories, feelings, and meanings that offer a cultural dimension to the byway experience and deepen the visitor's understanding of life on the tideline.
'When I first urged Richard Shelton to write his naturalist's memoir, I never expected him to produce a classic. But he has.' Redmond O'Hanlon, author of Trawler Fish have been a lifelong obsession for Richard Shelton. As a boy in the 1940s, he was fascinated by what he found in the streams near his Buckinghamshire home. But it was the sea and the creatures living in it and by it which were to become his passion. The Longshoreman follows the author from stream to river, from pond to lake and loch, from shore to deep sea, on a journey from childhood to an adulthood spent in boats in conditions fair and foul. Along the way, this wonderful book introduces us to strange characters and the intimate habits of lobsters; it also explains what it's like to be a lantern fish; how some fish commute between the surface and the darkest depths, when the laws of physics say they should be crushed to death; and the fate of the wild salmon, that heroic fish whose future is now imperilled by its farmed relatives. A keen fisherman and wildfowler, and an authority on marine life, Shelton has deeply held views on our relationship with the natural world, and Britain's with the seas which surround her.
Sara Adams wants a Spring Break with surf, sun, friends and fun, but she finds more than she expects. After falling overboard from her tour boat during a squall, she wakes up on a deserted island in the Bermuda Triangle. However, the island isn't as deserted as she first thinks. A handsome stranger brings her food that couldn't possibly grow there; but he always disappears at night and when it rains. Something tells her he isn't what he appears, but ancient forces and her fear of the ocean stand in the way of satisfying her heart.

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