Erfolgsautorin Sara Gruen («Wasser für die Elefanten») legt mit ihrem neuen New-York-Times-Bestseller eine fesselnde und ergreifende Geschichte in einem abgelegenen Dorf in den schottischen Highlands vor. «Eine bewegende Liebesgeschichte: ein schottisches Downton Abbey», urteilt Publishers Weekly. Im Januar 1945 reist die wohlhabende Maddie zusammen mit ihrem Ehemann Ellis und dessen bestem Freund in ein abgelegenes Dorf in den schottischen Highlands. Der exzentrische Ellis will die Existenz der sagenumwobenen Nessie beweisen, Krieg hin oder her. Ausgestattet mit Fernglas, Kompass und Kamera begeben sich die beiden Männer Tag für Tag auf Exkursion. Maddie bleibt allein zurück in der kargen Pension dieses fremden Ortes. Immer stärker stellt sie ihr bisheriges Leben in Frage. Wer ist sie, und was will sie? Da lernt sie die Menschen der Pension kennen, zwei Mägde und den geheimnisvollen Pensionsbesitzer Angus. Und plötzlich weitet sich ihr Blick für überraschende Möglichkeiten des Lebens ... Geballte Erzählkraft vor der atmosphärischen Kulisse von Loch Ness: eine packende Liebesgeschichte, ein mitreißendes Porträt weiblicher Emanzipation, eine Hymne auf die Kraft der Freundschaft.
This collection shows how the marginal territory of the water's edge has been represented in art in different places at various times and how such art contributed to the formation of cultural and national identities. Essays explore visual cultures of the Jordan and Vltava Rivers; the South African seaside resort of Durban; post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans; and the French Riviera, among other margins of river and sea.
The amphibious assault against a defended beach is fully explored from the perspective of the defender.
Everybody Out of the Pond At the Water's Edge will change the way you think about your place in the world. The awesome journey of life's transformation from the first microbes 4 billion years ago to Homo sapiens today is an epic that we are only now beginning to grasp. Magnificent and bizarre, it is the story of how we got here, what we left behind, and what we brought with us. We all know about evolution, but it still seems absurd that our ancestors were fish. Darwin's idea of natural selection was the key to solving generation-to-generation evolution -- microevolution -- but it could only point us toward a complete explanation, still to come, of the engines of macroevolution, the transformation of body shapes across millions of years. Now, drawing on the latest fossil discoveries and breakthrough scientific analysis, Carl Zimmer reveals how macroevolution works. Escorting us along the trail of discovery up to the current dramatic research in paleontology, ecology, genetics, and embryology, Zimmer shows how scientists today are unveiling the secrets of life that biologists struggled with two centuries ago. In this book, you will find a dazzling, brash literary talent and a rigorous scientific sensibility gracefully brought together. Carl Zimmer provides a comprehensive, lucid, and authoritative answer to the mystery of how nature actually made itself.
Prepare for a full dive! Umesato Junior High's culture festival is just around the corner, and Haruyuki is busy helping his classmates prepare for their exhibit. While everything may appear calm in the real world, however, the Accelerated World is steadily falling into chaos. Magenta Scissors is zeroing in on Silver Crow from an unexpected direction, and even his newfound Optical Conduction ability may not be enough to avert a tragedy!
The story of New York City that began before the first humans settled in the region twelve thousand years ago is told in a unique account of the area's geological history, a look at how the region has served as a habitat for a diversity of species, and a forecast for the potential future of the city in light of global warming.
'When I first urged Richard Shelton to write his naturalist's memoir, I never expected him to produce a classic. But he has.' Redmond O'Hanlon, author of Trawler Fish have been a lifelong obsession for Richard Shelton. As a boy in the 1940s, he was fascinated by what he found in the streams near his Buckinghamshire home. But it was the sea and the creatures living in it and by it which were to become his passion. The Longshoreman follows the author from stream to river, from pond to lake and loch, from shore to deep sea, on a journey from childhood to an adulthood spent in boats in conditions fair and foul. Along the way, this wonderful book introduces us to strange characters and the intimate habits of lobsters; it also explains what it's like to be a lantern fish; how some fish commute between the surface and the darkest depths, when the laws of physics say they should be crushed to death; and the fate of the wild salmon, that heroic fish whose future is now imperilled by its farmed relatives. A keen fisherman and wildfowler, and an authority on marine life, Shelton has deeply held views on our relationship with the natural world, and Britain's with the seas which surround her.
Sara Adams wants a Spring Break with surf, sun, friends and fun, but she finds more than she expects. After falling overboard from her tour boat during a squall, she wakes up on a deserted island in the Bermuda Triangle. However, the island isn't as deserted as she first thinks. A handsome stranger brings her food that couldn't possibly grow there; but he always disappears at night and when it rains. Something tells her he isn't what he appears, but ancient forces and her fear of the ocean stand in the way of satisfying her heart.
This the second novel in the saga series of Moon Rising. It is a continuation of where novel one left off. It is amazing what friendship can do for one another. Harold and Jay are summon back to help their new found friends.
For the last thirty years John Lister-Kaye, one of Britain's best-known nature writers, has taken the same circular walk from his home deep in a Scottish glen up to a small hill loch. Each day brings a new observation or an unexpected encounter - a fragile spider's web, an osprey struggling to lift a trout from the water or a woodcock exquisitely camouflaged on her nest - and every day, on his return home, he records his thoughts in a journal. Drawing on this lifetime of close observation, John Lister-Kaye's new book encourages us to look again at the nature around us and to discover its wildness for ourselves. It also forges wonderful connections between the most unlikely subjects, from photosynthesis and the energy cycle to Norse mythology, to weasels and perfume and to the over-population of our planet. At the Water's Edge is a lyrical hymn to the wildlife of Britain, and a powerful warning to respect and protect it.
SHORTLISTED FOR THE ROMANTIC NOVELISTS' ASSOCIATION HISTORICAL ROMANTIC NOVEL AWARD A gripping and poignant love story set in a remote village in the Scottish Highlands at the end of the Second World War. 'the only fault I can find with this book is that I've already finished it' Jodi Picoult 'truly enthralling' Scotsman 'breathtaking' Harper's Bazaar 1945. After disgracing themselves at a high society party, spoilt young Philadelphia socialites Maddie and Ellis Hyde are cut off from the family without a penny. Ellis decides their salvation will be to hunt down the Loch Ness Monster, a venture his father very publicly failed at. So, oblivious to WW2 raging around them, they make their way to the Scottish Highlands, where Maddie has to face reality and decide just who the real monsters are.
Now available for the first time as an eBook, this classic novel by New York Times bestselling author Nancy Thayer deftly and movingly explores the ebb and flow of love, fulfillment, and change for a mother and her two grown daughters. Margaret Wallace is a woman transformed. After thirty years of marriage and living in a small Iowa town, Margaret has divorced and relocated to Vancouver. While once she was the quintessential housewife and community caregiver, she now relishes the delicious freedom of being beholden to no one but herself. Her days are spent as she chooses, her mind continually occupied and expanding. But her sudden, dramatic change mystifies her two daughters, who need her now more than ever. Margaret’s elder daughter, Daisy, with two kids and another on the way, is content to be absorbed in the daily domestic tasks and maternal love that her children need. So when her husband demands a divorce, Daisy is devastated and adrift, stunned to find herself a single parent. Daisy’s younger sister, Dale, is freshly back from Europe, living and teaching in coastal Maine. She has suddenly, passionately fallen in love—but is terrified that the budding romance could end just as suddenly as her mother’s and sister’s have. As these three women face dramatic changes, their own relationships with each other will be challenged and reborn as they navigate uncharted waters. Includes a captivating preview of Nancy Thayer’s upcoming novel Nantucket Sisters! Praise for the novels of Nancy Thayer “The queen of beach books.”—The Star-Ledger “Thayer has a deep and masterly understanding of love and friendship, of where the two complement and where they collide.”—Elin Hilderbrand “Thayer’s gift for reaching the emotional core of her characters [is] captivating.”—Houston Chronicle “One of my favorite writers.”—Susan Wiggs “Thayer portrays beautifully the small moments, inside stories and shared histories that build families.”—The Miami Herald “Thayer’s sense of place is powerful, and her words are hung together the way my grandmother used to tat lace.”—Dorothea Benton Frank
This book takes an intimate, collaborative, interdisciplinary autoethnographic approach that both emphasizes the authors’ entangled relationships with the more-than-human, and understands the land and sea-scapes of Newfoundland as integral to their thinking, theorizing, and writing. The authors draw on feminist, trans, queer, critical race, Indigenous, decolonial, and posthuman theories in order to examine the relationships between origins, memories, place, identities, bodies, pasts, and futures. The chapters address a range of concerns, among them love, memory, weather, bodies, vulnerability, fog, myth, ice, desire, hauntings, and home. Autoethnography and Feminist Theory at the Water’s Edge will be of interest to students and scholars across a range of disciplines including gender studies, cultural geography, folklore, and anthropology, as well as those working in autoethnography, life writing, and island studies.
Renowned for its historic mansions, posh resorts, and deep blue waters, Lake Geneva is a haven for Chicago's movers and shakers since the Great Fire of 1871. This guide talks about Lake Geneva, providing images and details from local residents. It features tours of lakeshore homes, engaging profiles, and insights into the local scene.
Col. Theodore L. Gatchel, USMC (Ret.), examines amphibious operations from Gallipoli to the Falkland Islands to determine why the defenders were unable either to prevent the attackers from landing or to throw them back into the sea after they had fought their way ashore. He places the reader at the water's edge as such epic battles as Normandy, Iwo Jima, and Inchon are planned and fought. He then uses these cases to explain why the defenders, including many with distinguished combat records, could not successfully defend against enemy landings. A practitioner, teacher, and student of amphibious warfare, Colonel Gatchel follows these explanations with speculations about how a defender today might try to stop a landing, and the implications of such actions for future amphibious operations.
Mary Cheever called Kathleen O’Connor’s fiction “funny, sad, and utterly convincing.” These fifteen stories possess all those qualities. They also remind us of the importance of the connections between family, friends, and neighbors. The title story, Water’s Edge, details how an alienated young woman forges a bond with her grieving grandmother. In Through the Woods an elderly man reconnects with a troubled foster child. And the young boy in With Harry’s Help survives through his bond with a fictional character. The constant in all of O’Connor’s stories is the hope that comes from our need and love for each other.
"More than most wars in American history, the long and contentions Vietnam War had a profound effect on the home front, during the war and especially after. In At the Water's Edge, Melvin Small delivers the first study of the war's domestic politics." "Mr. Small shows that most of the military and diplomatic decisions made by Presidents Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon were heavily influenced by election cycles, relations with Congress, the state of the economy, and the polls. Although all three presidents and their advisers claimed that these decisions were made exclusively out of national security concerns, much evidence suggests otherwise. In turn, the war had a transforming impact on American society

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