The best and/or most informative nonfiction books in the English language on the subject of human sexuality are described in this comprehensive bibliography for professionals, scholars, students, and laypeople. The 1,091 informative abstracts, including nearly 500 titles new to this edition, range in length from 100 to 600 words and have been written from an impartial viewpoint to facilitate the reader's choice of materials, regardless of political or moral stance. Virtually all current, pressing sexual issues are represented-abortion, AIDS, child sex abuse, incest, rape, sexual harassment, homosexuality, pornography, prostitution, and so forth. Annotations on selected books have been arranged according to a revised version of the unique classification scheme introduced in the first edition. Systematic two-fold access to the contents of the guide is provided by a detailed table of contents and by author, title, and subject indexes. Focus of this edition is on books published since 1970, with new ma
D. H. Lawrence, asserts Jack Stewart, expresses a painter's vision in words, supplementing visual images with verbal rhythms. With the help of twenty-three illustrations, Stewart shows how Lawrence's style relates to impressionism, expressionism, primitivism, and futurism. Stewart examines Lawrence's painterly vision in The White Peacock, Sons and Lovers, The Rainbow, Women in Love, Kangaroo, and The Plumed Serpent. Stewart's final three chapters deal with the influence exerted on Lawrence's fiction by the work of Van Gogh, Cezanne, Gauguin, and the Japanese artists Hokusai and Hiroshige. He concludes by synthesizing the themes that pervade this interarts study: vision and expression, art and ontology.
An interdisciplinary study of the relationship between text and image in "Fin-de-Siecle" first editions, from elite "belles-lettres" to popular mass-market books. Focusing on the power relations embedded in bitextual relationships, it explores the context
David Hopkins analyses the extensive network of shared concerns and images in the work of Marcel Duchamp and Max Ernst, the greatest names associated with Dada and Surrealist art. This book covers a broad period from c.1912 to the mid-1940s, during which the emergence of Dada and Surrealism in Europe and the United States challenged earlier movements such as Cubism and Expressionism, creating scope for the expression of the unconscious fears and desires of artists acutely sensitive tothe troubled nature of their times. Examining Duchamp's and Ernst's subversion and manipulation of religious and hermetic beliefs such as Catholicism, Rosicrucianism and Masonry, David Hopkins demonstrates the ways in which these esoteric concerns intersect with themes of peculiarly contemporary relevance, including the social construction of gender and notions of ordering and taxonomy. This detailed comparison of components of Duchamp's and Ernst's work reveals fascinating structural patterns, enabling the reader to discover an entirely new way of understanding the mechanisms underlying Dada and Surrealist iconography.
This substantial survey discusses state, civic, commercial, church, private, and other British murals. Written by the leading authority in Britain on mural painting after 1800, it is a pioneering study that covers works by over 400 artists and numerous murals never previously documented or illustrated.
This book analyzes a wide range of Beardsley's most characteristic work. It establishes his assumptions about the underlying nature of his world, and clarifies why so many observers have considered Beardsley's art indispensable to understanding fin-de-siecle Victorian culture. Beardsley's pictures present a dialogue between seemingly polarized impulses: a desire to scandalize and destabilize the old order, and, equally strong, a need to affirm traditional authority. Beardsley depicted various grotesque shapes, caricatures, and mutated figures, including foetus/old man, dwarf, Clown, Harlequin, Pierrot, and dandy (the icon of the Decadent "Religion of Art"). Incarnating the fearful contradictions of decadence, these images served as objective correlatives of some "monstrous" metaphysical contortion. His grotesques suggest the impossibility of resolving these contradictions, even as his elegant designs try formalistically to control and recuperate the disfiguration. As a canonical style, Beardsley's "dandy" sensibility and grotesque caricatures become his means of realigning canonical meaning. Thus, he effects what might be termed a "caricature" of traditional signification. An aesthete devoted to the "Religion of Art", Beardsley, nonetheless, creates a world inescapably "de-formed". He is a Dandy of the Grotesque.

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