Henry Hughes has been fishing his entire life. But unlike those who stick to their local stream, Hughes has traveled the world in search of new and exciting adventures. Back Seat with Fish is unlike any memoir you’ve ever read. Traveling across East Asia—from Beijing to Bangkok—as well as throughout the United States, Hughes shares stories of the fish he’s caught and the people he’s met. Fishing is a sport that crosses boundaries of race, ethnicity, gender, and class. In his travels, Hughes learns lessons on issues of race and culture as he interacts with a wide variety of people who share his love for fishing and enjoy the sensual connection between the salty pleasures and tensions of human and fish life. Throughout the adventures in Back Seat with Fish are tales with carp and fugu, sharks and snakeheads, as well as exchanges with a variety of people, including a Sioux Indian from South Dakota, an elderly African American on the Mississippi, and waterside inhabitants of Beijing. But Hughes’s journey isn’t just for people who fish or love nature. Back Seat with Fish is for anyone who enjoys a good story. Skyhorse Publishing, along with our Arcade, Good Books, Sports Publishing, and Yucca imprints, is proud to publish a broad range of biographies, autobiographies, and memoirs. Our list includes biographies on well-known historical figures like Benjamin Franklin, Nelson Mandela, and Alexander Graham Bell, as well as villains from history, such as Heinrich Himmler, John Wayne Gacy, and O. J. Simpson. We have also published survivor stories of World War II, memoirs about overcoming adversity, first-hand tales of adventure, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.
Fishing is many things to many people. To some, quietly dangling a worm for a sunfish in a local farm pond is not only exciting, but relaxing and reflective. To others, it’s all about the adventure of traveling to exotic locales and fishing for ten-pound rainbow trout in Alaska or 100-pound tarpon in Central America. To others, it’s an integral part of life, not just a pastime but something to live for. Still others feel compelled to write about it, to try to understand this sport that grips so many. In this collection, you’ll read works from celebrated writers that aim to explore the mysterious grip that fishing has held on so many of us. Within these pages, the reader can: Join Rudyard Kipling as he chases a cow that has stolen his minnow Examine the philosophical side of angling with Thaddeus Norris Fish the Ohio River with John James Audubon Learn what it’s like to fish for Great Lakes steelhead with Jerry Hamza Get used to fishing alongside Alaskan brown bears with Richard Chiappone And many more fishing escapades! With more than three dozen photographs and illustrations that masterfully bring these stories to life, Incredible Fishing Stories is a must-have for every angler looking to share in the joy of their chosen sport.
Trash Fish is the story of a boy who gives himself over to his obsession with fish as an escape from the trials of growing up. Time and again, as his life unfolds to reveal his failings and foibles to those around him, he returns to the fish, which cast him a lifeline of their own. Laugh-out-loud funny yet sardonically raw to the bone, Keeler tells a whole whirlpool of a story—the women, the Peace Corps, the teaching jobs, the marriage and children, and, of course, the rod and reel. Eventually, however, his serene fishing life becomes contaminated with real-world influences: a polite society of angling purists insists that he choose between flies and bait, while his alter ego (and nemesis) begins to use fishing as an excuse to cheat on his wife. Ultimately, Keeler’s fisherman must acknowledge that he can’t escape down the river bend, and that in order to experience true love, he must accept the complexities within himself and within the people on land around him.
Eight years ago, Donnie Davis' world was ripped apart on his sixth birthdayothe day his mother was killed in Black Lake. His subconscious mind refuses to unlock the terrible events that took place that day and he fears he's the one responsible for her death. His father swears Donnie was miles away when tragedy struck. But what his father swears doesn't match the nightmare that plagues Donnie. That same summer, the sacred burial ground of the Pictaw tribe lay in jeopardy of being desecrated. Business entrepreneurs bought land near the great burial rock with plans to build a resort on the lake. The government refused to stop these men, so the Pictaw chief brought to life the legend of Black Lake. Ne-mu-te, the vicious, sly water spirit once again swam the dark waters. Wasis, the white wolf, keeper of souls, roamed the forest. Now, eight years later, Donnie's quest to find the truth about his mother's death threatens to expose the only weapon Crooked Duck, the Pictaw Indian chief, possesses that can stop the destruction of the Pictaw sacred burial ground.
Rose Mae Lolley's mother disappeared when she was eight, leaving Rose with a heap of old novels and a taste for dangerous men. Now, as demure Mrs. Ro Grandee, she's living the very life her mother abandoned. She's all but forgotten the girl she used to be-teenaged spitfire, Alabama heartbreaker, and a crack shot with a pistol-until an airport gypsy warns Rose it's time to find her way back to that brave, tough girl . . . or else. Armed with only her wit, her pawpy's ancient .45, and her dog Fat Gretel, Rose Mae hightails it out of Texas, running from a man who will never let her go, on a mission to find the mother who did. Starring a minor character from Jackson's bestselling gods in Alabama, BACKSEAT SAINTS will dazzle readers with its stunning portrayal of the measures a mother will take to right the wrongs she's created, and how far a daughter will travel to satisfy the demands of forgiveness.
This book is about a couples forty-year journey through ministry. They encounter challenges in their personal lives as they move from one place to another. Their main goal is to bloom where they are appointed! They do this by helping other people face the challenges and setbacks in life as well as rejoicing with them over the victories in life. Life never stays the same, and it requires knowing how to move on after suffering a setback or winning a victory. This, then, is their story.
In this comprehensive and readable guide, Tom Rosenbauer shares his vast knowledge of fly fishing when there is no hatch. Written for both the novice and the seasoned angler, The Orvis Guide to Prospecting for Trout, New and Revised explores how trout live and feed, and how to make them strike, with a thoroughly updated text that addresses state-of-the-art approaches, and all new color photography. There is expert advice on how to fish with dry flies, wet flies, nymphs, and streamers—supported by many detailed illustrations and photos. This is the guide no trout fisherman should be without.
When Tony Caruso is hired to go undercover for the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, he has no idea that his life will change forever in the remote mountains of Oregon. He is tasked to track down an Asian ring of smugglers who are killing black bears for gallbladders and shooting elk and deer in velvet for their antlers. He narrowly escapes with his life, but follows the smugglers to Portland. Eventually, he ends up in the southern Cascades in the mushroom fields, where he must fight not only the Asian game smugglers, but Asian gangs from San Francisco and Seattle. As Tony tightens the noose around the smugglers, the case becomes personal. Now he must encounter these brutal killers in the remote forest, where his survival depends on his own military training and his favorite sidekick, Panzer, his giant schnauzer and former German military working dog.
Follow the life of Emmie, a girl that grew up in, and loved the mountains of West Virginia. She has left her home now, when she married and gone to live in the big house her grandmother gave her in Charleston. Follow her as she solves the mysteries of the big house and Aunt Bella, the woman that used to live there years before! Emmie’s love and country personality, will captivate your heart, she has a child like seeing her world, also the fact she has inherited the family gift of second sight, which is often found in sections of the mountains.
First Fish, First People brings together writers from two continents and four countries whose traditional cultures are based on Pacific wild salmon: Ainu from Japan; Ulchi and Nyvkh from Siberia; Okanagan and Coast Salish from Canada; and Makah, Warm Springs, and Spokane from the United States remember the blessedness and mourn the loss of the wild salmon while alerting us to current environmental dangers and conditions. The text is enhanced by traditional designs from each nation and photographs, both contemporary and historical, as well as personal family pictures from the writers. Together, words and images offer a prayer that our precious remaining wild salmon will increase and flourish.
This is a collection of tales about nature, fishing, adventure, humor, history, and dumb teenage acts. All is true, at least as I remember things. Dont expect the Great American Novel, or for that matter a true biography. Youll find out a lot about me as it is, as you read. This is necessary to help you understand where these tales are coming from. Im not sure myself, but I had a lot of fun living these tales.
"Containing cases decided in Sri Lanka (Ceylon) by the Court of Appeal, the Supreme Court and the Court of Criminal Appeal." (varies)
Mia is fifteen and during her summer vacation she starts working at a children's playhouse, meets new people (including Eric, who she knew once long ago when he was not so interesting) and continues sibling warfare with her younger brother Chris.
Jim Dean, longtime editor of Wildlife in North Carolina, offers his personal observations on the pleasures and frustrations of hunting, fishing, camping, and other outdoor pursuits. Dogs That Point, Fish That Bite draws together fifty of the best columns that Dean has written for the magazine over the last seventeen years. The witty, sometimes poignant pieces are arranged into a loose chronicle of the sporting year, with a generous allowance for digression: the first is set in April, on the opening day of trout season, and the last tells of a New Year's Day spent alone in a mountain cabin. At first glance, hunting and fishing are the focus of most of the columns. Often, however, Dean is after bigger game. A crab that escapes the pot leads him to reflect on the capricious nature of life. The restoration of a cabin at the old family farm evokes memories of family and simpler times. And a May panfishing trip takes on the quality of ritual, performed by two old friends. The consistent theme uniting all the essays is the celebration of wild places and rural traditions that have become endangered in our modern world.
This book is about 58 wonderful years of family camping in the inspirational Adirondacks. It exposes the pleasures of one of New York's great campgrounds.
A mentally challenged teen in a coma, a WWII veteran weighing his beliefs, an intersexed man anticipating a relationship, a single woman who has kissed far too many frogs, and a first grader suffering at the hands of a family friend. These are just a few of the unforgettable characters in Fortune Teller Miracle Fish, an innovative collection of stories from award-winning novelist and poet Cathryn Hankla. The figures in these stories struggle toward more truthful expressions of themselves, as outsiders whose dilemmas, emotions, and desires make them unmistakably human. As varied as they are vivid, they strive for closer connections of love and community. Through humor and understanding, Hankla intrepidly navigates the transitions that define them—unplanned pregnancy, divorce, death, and gender change, to name a few. Acutely attuned to her subjects’ inner landscapes, Hankla captures the full spectrum of human experience, from childhood to old age, with heart, rare skill, and nerve.
Wild with Child is a unique collection of true stories by parents who boldly head out into the wilderness with kids in tow (or in the lead, as the case may be). These stories run the gamut of adventure: winter camping, climbing, spelunking, field research, skiing, llama trekking, fishing, hunting, and searching for pirate treasure with children of all ages. Readers should bundle up before they strike out into the Rocky Mountains with Mark Jenkins, whose idea of quality time with the kids is camping in a snow cave. Leslie Leyland-Fields shares deep gratitude as her brood safely migrates to an Alaskan island by bush plane. Maleesha Speer confides her personal evolution as she awakens to the wonder of her unborn child in bear country. Whether just beginning the course of wild parenting or looking back at the trail they've taken, these writers aren't willing to accept Disneyland as the final frontier. Even the most civilized among them insist that their children grow up feeling grass between their toes and sun on their skin. It’s a healthy heritage, giving kids a steady set of bearings, making them strong, and helping them rise to challenges.
Provides step-by-step instructions for weaving chair seats from cane, rush, Hong Kong grass, rope, twine, and splints, and discusses useful equipment and supplies

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