This book provides an accessible introduction to algebraic topology, a field at the intersection of topology, geometry and algebra, together with its applications. Moreover, it covers several related topics that are in fact important in the overall scheme of algebraic topology. Comprising eighteen chapters and two appendices, the book integrates various concepts of algebraic topology, supported by examples, exercises, applications and historical notes. Primarily intended as a textbook, the book offers a valuable resource for undergraduate, postgraduate and advanced mathematics students alike. Focusing more on the geometric than on algebraic aspects of the subject, as well as its natural development, the book conveys the basic language of modern algebraic topology by exploring homotopy, homology and cohomology theories, and examines a variety of spaces: spheres, projective spaces, classical groups and their quotient spaces, function spaces, polyhedra, topological groups, Lie groups and cell complexes, etc. The book studies a variety of maps, which are continuous functions between spaces. It also reveals the importance of algebraic topology in contemporary mathematics, theoretical physics, computer science, chemistry, economics, and the biological and medical sciences, and encourages students to engage in further study.
Building on rudimentary knowledge of real analysis, point-set topology, and basic algebra, Basic Algebraic Topology provides plenty of material for a two-semester course in algebraic topology. The book first introduces the necessary fundamental concepts, such as relative homotopy, fibrations and cofibrations, category theory, cell complexes, and simplicial complexes. It then focuses on the fundamental group, covering spaces and elementary aspects of homology theory. It presents the central objects of study in topology visualization: manifolds. After developing the homology theory with coefficients, homology of the products, and cohomology algebra, the book returns to the study of manifolds, discussing Poincaré duality and the De Rham theorem. A brief introduction to cohomology of sheaves and Čech cohomology follows. The core of the text covers higher homotopy groups, Hurewicz’s isomorphism theorem, obstruction theory, Eilenberg-Mac Lane spaces, and Moore-Postnikov decomposition. The author then relates the homology of the total space of a fibration to that of the base and the fiber, with applications to characteristic classes and vector bundles. The book concludes with the basic theory of spectral sequences and several applications, including Serre’s seminal work on higher homotopy groups. Thoroughly classroom-tested, this self-contained text takes students all the way to becoming algebraic topologists. Historical remarks throughout the text make the subject more meaningful to students. Also suitable for researchers, the book provides references for further reading, presents full proofs of all results, and includes numerous exercises of varying levels.
This self-contained treatment begins with three chapters on the basics of point-set topology, after which it proceeds to homology groups and continuous mapping, barycentric subdivision, and simplicial complexes. 1961 edition.
The book is primarily intended as a textbook on modern algebra for undergraduate mathematics students. It is also useful for those who are interested in supplementary reading at a higher level. The text is designed in such a way that it encourages independent thinking and motivates students towards further study. The book covers all major topics in group, ring, vector space and module theory that are usually contained in a standard modern algebra text. In addition, it studies semigroup, group action, Hopf's group, topological groups and Lie groups with their actions, applications of ring theory to algebraic geometry, and defines Zariski topology, as well as applications of module theory to structure theory of rings and homological algebra. Algebraic aspects of classical number theory and algebraic number theory are also discussed with an eye to developing modern cryptography. Topics on applications to algebraic topology, category theory, algebraic geometry, algebraic number theory, cryptography and theoretical computer science interlink the subject with different areas. Each chapter discusses individual topics, starting from the basics, with the help of illustrative examples. This comprehensive text with a broad variety of concepts, applications, examples, exercises and historical notes represents a valuable and unique resource.
This volume is the first comprehensive treatment of combinatorial algebraic topology in book form. The first part of the book constitutes a swift walk through the main tools of algebraic topology. Readers - graduate students and working mathematicians alike - will probably find particularly useful the second part, which contains an in-depth discussion of the major research techniques of combinatorial algebraic topology. Although applications are sprinkled throughout the second part, they are principal focus of the third part, which is entirely devoted to developing the topological structure theory for graph homomorphisms.
This monograph is based, in part, upon lectures given in the Princeton School of Engineering and Applied Science. It presupposes mainly an elementary knowledge of linear algebra and of topology. In topology the limit is dimension two mainly in the latter chapters and questions of topological invariance are carefully avoided. From the technical viewpoint graphs is our only requirement. However, later, questions notably related to Kuratowski's classical theorem have demanded an easily provided treatment of 2-complexes and surfaces. January 1972 Solomon Lefschetz 4 INTRODUCTION The study of electrical networks rests upon preliminary theory of graphs. In the literature this theory has always been dealt with by special ad hoc methods. My purpose here is to show that actually this theory is nothing else than the first chapter of classical algebraic topology and may be very advantageously treated as such by the well known methods of that science. Part I of this volume covers the following ground: The first two chapters present, mainly in outline, the needed basic elements of linear algebra. In this part duality is dealt with somewhat more extensively. In Chapter III the merest elements of general topology are discussed. Graph theory proper is covered in Chapters IV and v, first structurally and then as algebra. Chapter VI discusses the applications to networks. In Chapters VII and VIII the elements of the theory of 2-dimensional complexes and surfaces are presented.
This volume deals with the theory of finite topological spaces and its relationship with the homotopy and simple homotopy theory of polyhedra. The interaction between their intrinsic combinatorial and topological structures makes finite spaces a useful tool for studying problems in Topology, Algebra and Geometry from a new perspective. In particular, the methods developed in this manuscript are used to study Quillen's conjecture on the poset of p-subgroups of a finite group and the Andrews-Curtis conjecture on the 3-deformability of contractible two-dimensional complexes. This self-contained work constitutes the first detailed exposition on the algebraic topology of finite spaces. It is intended for topologists and combinatorialists, but it is also recommended for advanced undergraduate students and graduate students with a modest knowledge of Algebraic Topology.
Algebraic topology is a basic part of modern mathematics, and some knowledge of this area is indispensable for any advanced work relating to geometry, including topology itself, differential geometry, algebraic geometry, and Lie groups. This book provides a detailed treatment of algebraic topology both for teachers of the subject and for advanced graduate students in mathematics either specializing in this area or continuing on to other fields. J. Peter May's approach reflects the enormous internal developments within algebraic topology over the past several decades, most of which are largely unknown to mathematicians in other fields. But he also retains the classical presentations of various topics where appropriate. Most chapters end with problems that further explore and refine the concepts presented. The final four chapters provide sketches of substantial areas of algebraic topology that are normally omitted from introductory texts, and the book concludes with a list of suggested readings for those interested in delving further into the field.
Algebraic topology is the study of the global properties of spaces by means of algebra. It is an important branch of modern mathematics with a wide degree of applicability to other fields, including geometric topology, differential geometry, functional analysis, differential equations, algebraic geometry, number theory, and theoretical physics. This book provides an introduction to the basic concepts and methods of algebraic topology for the beginner. It presents elements of both homology theory and homotopy theory, and includes various applications. The author's intention is to rely on the geometric approach by appealing to the reader's own intuition to help understanding. The numerous illustrations in the text also serve this purpose. Two features make the text different from the standard literature: first, special attention is given to providing explicit algorithms for calculating the homology groups and for manipulating the fundamental groups. Second, the book contains many exercises, all of which are supplied with hints or solutions. This makes the book suitable for both classroom use and for independent study.
"Topology can present significant challenges for undergraduate students of mathematics and the sciences. 'Understanding topology' aims to change that. The perfect introductory topology textbook, 'Understanding topology' requires only a knowledge of calculus and a general familiarity with set theory and logic. Equally approachable and rigorous, the book's clear organization, worked examples, and concise writing style support a thorough understanding of basic topological principles. Professor Shaun V. Ault's unique emphasis on fascinating applications, from chemical dynamics to determining the shape of the universe, will engage students in a way traditional topology textbooks do not"--
This book provides an accessible introduction to algebraic topology, a field at the intersection of topology, geometry and algebra, together with its applications. Moreover, it covers several related topics that are in fact important in the overall scheme of algebraic topology. Comprising eighteen chapters and two appendices, the book integrates various concepts of algebraic topology, supported by examples, exercises, applications and historical notes. Primarily intended as a textbook, the book offers a valuable resource for undergraduate, postgraduate and advanced mathematics students alike. Focusing more on the geometric than on algebraic aspects of the subject, as well as its natural development, the book conveys the basic language of modern algebraic topology by exploring homotopy, homology and cohomology theories, and examines a variety of spaces: spheres, projective spaces, classical groups and their quotient spaces, function spaces, polyhedra, topological groups, Lie groups and cell complexes, etc. The book studies a variety of maps, which are continuous functions between spaces. It also reveals the importance of algebraic topology in contemporary mathematics, theoretical physics, computer science, chemistry, economics, and the biological and medical sciences, and encourages students to engage in further study.
Developed from a first-year graduate course in algebraic topology, this text is an informal introduction to some of the main ideas of contemporary homotopy and cohomology theory. The materials are structured around four core areas: de Rham theory, the Cech-de Rham complex, spectral sequences, and characteristic classes. By using the de Rham theory of differential forms as a prototype of cohomology, the machineries of algebraic topology are made easier to assimilate. With its stress on concreteness, motivation, and readability, this book is equally suitable for self-study and as a one-semester course in topology.
The single most difficult thing one faces when one begins to learn a new branch of mathematics is to get a feel for the mathematical sense of the subject. The purpose of this book is to help the aspiring reader acquire this essential common sense about algebraic topology in a short period of time. To this end, Sato leads the reader through simple but meaningful examples in concrete terms. Moreover, results are not discussed in their greatest possible generality, but in terms of the simplest and most essential cases. In response to suggestions from readers of the original edition of this book, Sato has added an appendix of useful definitions and results on sets, general topology, groups and such. He has also provided references. Topics covered include fundamental notions such as homeomorphisms, homotopy equivalence, fundamental groups and higher homotopy groups, homology and cohomology, fiber bundles, spectral sequences and characteristic classes. Objects and examples considered in the text include the torus, the Mobius strip, the Klein bottle, closed surfaces, cell complexes and vector bundles.
Cohomology operations are at the center of a major area of activity in algebraic topology. This treatment explores the single most important variety of operations, the Steenrod squares. It constructs these operations, proves their major properties, and provides numerous applications, including several different techniques of homotopy theory useful for computation. 1968 edition.
This book is written as a textbook on algebraic topology. Prerequisites are standard point set topology (as recalled in the first chapter), elementary algebraic notions (modules, tensor product), and some terminology from category theory. The aim of the book is to introduce advanced undergraduate and graduate (masters) students to basic tools, concepts and results of algebraic topology. Sufficient background material from geometry and algebra is included.
This introduction to some basic ideas in algebraic topology is devoted to the foundations and applications of homology theory. After the essentials of singular homology and some important applications are given, successive topics covered include attaching spaces, finite CW complexes, cohomology products, manifolds, Poincare duality, and fixed point theory. This second edition includes a chapter on covering spaces and many new exercises.
Category Theory now permeates most of Mathematics, large parts of theoretical Computer Science and parts of theoretical Physics. Its unifying power brings together different branches, and leads to a deeper understanding of their roots. This book is addressed to students and researchers of these fields and can be used as a text for a first course in Category Theory. It covers its basic tools, like universal properties, limits, adjoint functors and monads. These are presented in a concrete way, starting from examples and exercises taken from elementary Algebra, Lattice Theory and Topology, then developing the theory together with new exercises and applications. Applications of Category Theory form a vast and differentiated domain. This book wants to present the basic applications and a choice of more advanced ones, based on the interests of the author. References are given for applications in many other fields. Contents: Introduction Categories, Functors and Natural Transformations Limits and Colimits Adjunctions and Monads Applications in Algebra Applications in Topology and Algebraic Topology Applications in Homological Algebra Hints at Higher Dimensional Category Theory References Indices Readership: Graduate students and researchers of mathematics, computer science, physics. Keywords: Category TheoryReview: Key Features: The main notions of Category Theory are presented in a concrete way, starting from examples taken from the elementary part of well-known disciplines: Algebra, Lattice Theory and Topology The theory is developed presenting other examples and some 300 exercises; the latter are endowed with a solution, or a partial solution, or adequate hints Three chapters and some extra sections are devoted to applications

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