Introduces beach processes within an approach that balances an engineering perspective against a purely geological one.Provides an up-to-date review of the current understanding of beach processes as well as applications to solve coastal problems (erosion, management issues, etc.). Discusses issues related to beach erosion and other processes. The second edition ofBeach Processes and Sedimentation has been updated to include information gathered from two decades of science and engineering in the field, reflecting the vast increase in knowledge since the first edition. Discusses the rise of coastal zone management as well as patterns of wave transformations and dissipation within the surf zone, and how these water motions produce cross-shore movements of sediment resulting in beach-profile variations.An essential reference book for many readers: from beach front property owners to politicians contending with beachfront erosion to engineers addressing beachfront reclamation projects.
As coastal populations burgeon, problems of erosion, pollution and coastal change are becoming ever more serious and necessitate scientifically informed management strategies. This authoritative new study discusses the causes of, and possible solutions to, some of the more pressing problems at the coast, against a background of the natural geomorphological and ecological workings of coastal environments. A holistic approach to the understanding of coastal problems is suggested, which integrates geomorphology, ecology and society through a consideration of the basic processes at work. Coastal problems are caused by both human and natural impacts, often working in conjunction with each other; thus drawing on their wide experience of temperate and tropical coasts the authors consider all types of coastal problems, ranging from those produced entirely naturally to those where the human impact dominates. Extensive use is made of case studies drawn from around the world, from beach erosion along the Nigerian coast to the recovery of the Vietnamese mangroves from war damage. A major theme of the book is that, given recent downgrading of predictions of future sea level rise, it is the distinctive geomorphological, ecological and societal aspects of each coast which are the vital factors. 'Coastal Problems' brings together material vital to any attempts to understand and manage our coasts and will be of interest to all those concerned with the environment and its management.
This book places research into worldwide beach environments in its geomorphological context. Having introduced the systems approach to environmental modelling, and identified the groups of processes operating on beaches, the text is structured in five parts: the first three sections provide a sequential account of the effects of these processes on the beach system; part four focuses on theory relevant to landform stability, then reviews existing empirical, analytical and numerical models; and the final section introduces a computer model and shows its application to the process functions developed earlier.
How to cope with natural disasters on the Washington and Oregon coast, part of the Living with the Shore Series.
The purpose of this book is to supply the background needed to structure research on estuarine beach resources and provide the basis for a program for informed management. The book is a synthesis of data on physical, biological, and human processes.
This new Encyclopedia of Coastal Science stands as the latest authoritative source in the field of coastal studies, making it the standard reference work for specialists and the interested lay person. Unique in its interdisciplinary approach. This Encyclopedia features contributions by 245 well-known international specialists in their respective fields and is abundantly illustrated with line-drawings and photographs. Not only does this volume offer an extensive number of entries, it also includes various appendices, an illustrated glossary of coastal morphology and extensive bibliographic listings.
The plate tectonics revolution in the earth sciences has provided a valuable new framework for understanding long-term landform development. This innovative text provides a comprehensive introduction to the subject of global geomorphology, with the emphasis placed on large-scale processes and phenomena. Integrating global tectonics into the study of landforms and incorporating planetary geomorphology as a major component the author discusses the impact of climatic change and the role of catastrophic events on landform genesis and includes a comprehensive study of surface geomorphic processes.
The purpose of this monograph is to provide participants in my various short courses with a brief statement of the material I cover in my lectures. In addition, key illustrations are reproduced for guidance. A brief bibliography of reference material is appended to each chapter. The bibliographic material includes those references that I consider critical to my remarks. No claim is made of topical or bibliographic completeness. This monograph also is intended as a brief summary of depositional processes, Holocene sediments, ancient counterparts of depositional environments, and examples of oil- and gas-bearing stratigraphic traps in five depositional environments. This summary is intended to complement lecture and reading courses dealing with sedimentology, depositional systems, sedimentary facies, sedimentary environments, sandstone diagenesis, and sedimentary modelling as a predictive tool for exploration. The student is cautioned, however, that this monograph is merely an introduction and summary overview of the subject. More complete treatments appear in standard textbooks. Sedimentology has changed and advanced over the past twenty-five years, in part because the American oil industry needed to make predictions about the occurrence of the harder-to-find stratigraphic traps. In addition, the development of plate-tectonic theory, and supportive data from the Deep Sea Drilling Project, have caused sedimentology to change from an essentially descriptive science to a mature, predictive science. The 1960s and 1970s in particular witnessed an explosion of new insights and understanding of how sediments are deposited, and how sedimentary rocks are formed.
Noted coastal geologist Orrin Pilkey and environmental scientist Linda Pilkey-Jarvis show that the quantitative mathematical models policy makers and government administrators use to form environmental policies are seriously flawed. Based on unrealistic and sometimes false assumptions, these models often yield answers that support unwise policies. Writing for the general, nonmathematician reader and using examples from throughout the environmental sciences, Pilkey and Pilkey-Jarvis show how unquestioned faith in mathematical models can blind us to the hard data and sound judgment of experienced scientific fieldwork. They begin with a riveting account of the extinction of the North Atlantic cod on the Grand Banks of Canada. Next they engage in a general discussion of the limitations of many models across a broad array of crucial environmental subjects. The book offers fascinating case studies depicting how the seductiveness of quantitative models has led to unmanageable nuclear waste disposal practices, poisoned mining sites, unjustifiable faith in predicted sea level rise rates, bad predictions of future shoreline erosion rates, overoptimistic cost estimates of artificial beaches, and a host of other thorny problems. The authors demonstrate how many modelers have been reckless, employing fudge factors to assure "correct" answers and caring little if their models actually worked. A timely and urgent book written in an engaging style, Useless Arithmetic evaluates the assumptions behind models, the nature of the field data, and the dialogue between modelers and their "customers."
This book is the outgrowth of a week-long conference on sandstone organized by the authors, first held at Banff, Alberta, in 1964 under the auspices of the Alberta Association of Petroleum Geologists and the University of Alberta, and again, in 1965, at Bloomington, Indiana, under the sponsorship of the Indiana Geological Survey and the Department of Geology, Indiana University. A 2- page syllabus was prepared for the second conference and published by the Indiana Geological Survey. Continuing interest in and demand for the syllabus prompted us to update and expand its contents. The result is this book. We hope this work will be useful as a text or supplementary text for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in sedimentation, sedimentary petrology, or general petrology and perhaps will be helpful to the teachers of such courses. Though we have focussed on sandstones we have necessarily included much of interest to students of all sediments. We hope also that it will be a useful reference work for the professional geologist, especially those concerned with petroleum, ground-water, and economic geology either in industry or government. Because the subject is so closely tied to surface processes it may also be of interest to geo morphologists and engineers who deal with beaches and rivers where sand is in transit.
Good,No Highlights,No Markup,all pages are intact, Slight Shelfwear,may have the corners slightly dented, may have slight color changes/slightly damaged spine.
The "Sea Floor" is designed to acquaint students with the most important results achieved in marine geology over the last three decades and the scientists who brought them about. Written by two of marine geology's leading exponents, it lays the groundwork for studies in geology, oceanography and environmental sciences by summarizing modern insights into tectonics and marine morphology, the geological processes at work on the sea floor, and the Earth's climatic history as recorded in deep sea sediments.
Much of the U.S. coastline is rapidly changing--mostly eroding. That fact places increasing pressure on the planners and managers responsible for coastal development and protection, and could have a direct effect on many of the 125 million Americans living within 50 miles of the coast who rely on its resources and beaches for their livelihood or recreation. Although rapid advances have been made in the measurement systems needed to understand and describe the forces and changes at work in the surf-zone environment, their potential for allowing more accurate and reliable planning and engineering responses has not been fully realized. This book assesses coastal data needs, instrumentation, and analyses, and recommends areas in which more information or better instrumentation is needed.
Coastal Defences aims to present the broad spectrum of methods that engineers use to protect the coastline and investigates the sorts of issues that can arise as a result. The first section of the book examines 'traditional' hard techniques, such as sea walls and groynes, whilst the second looks at the more recent trend of using techniques more sympathetic to nature. By looking at each of the main methods of coastal protection in detail, the book investigates the rationale for using each method and the consequent management issues, presenting a case for and against each of the techniques.
Along much of the shoreline of the world, tidal inlets play an important role in nearshore processes, providing links between the coastal oceans and protected embayments. Their study is of particular importance not only for the understanding of fundamental processes in coastal oceanography but also for engineering and the proper management of the delicate equilibrium of our shorelines. This volume, based on the International Symposium on Hydrodynamics and Sediment Dynamics of Tidal Inlets held at Woods Hole, MA, presents the reader with an overview of contemporary research on these important features. The coverage includes: - mathematical modelling, including a review of inlet hydrodynamics, - observations on hydrodynamics, - sedimentology and morphology, - tidal deltas, - processes and policies pertaining to sedimentation, and the - impacts of shore protection and dredging in beaches.
Completely revised and updated for its second edition, this volume belongs to the Open University series on oceanography. It is designed so that it can be read on its own or studied as part of the Open University third-level course, S330 Oceanography. The book begins by describing the characteristics of waves and tides, and their behaviour in shallow water. After outlining the sources of sediment supply to the oceans, some theoretical aspects of sediment movement and deposition by currents are considered. After looking at wave action in the littoral zone, the interplay of tidal currents, river flow and wave action in estuaries and deltas are explored. The final chapter provides an overview of shelf processes. This is a vital book for all oceanography undergraduate students worldwide. Easy to use question and answer format Full colour illustrations throughout 35-40% revised and extended from 1st edition

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