Jean Toomer's "Cane" was advertised as "a book about Negroes by a Negro," despite his request not to promote the book along such racial lines. Nella Larsen switched the title of her second novel from "Nig" to "Passing," because an editor felt the original title "might be too inflammatory." In order to publish his first novel as a Book-of-the-Month Club main selection Richard Wright deleted a scene in "Native Son" depicting Bigger Thomas masturbating. Toni Morrison changed the last word of "Beloved" at her editor's request and switched the title of "Paradise" from "War" to allay her publisher's marketing concerns. Although many editors place demands on their authors, these examples invite special scholarly attention given the power imbalance between white editors and publishers and African American authors. "Black Writers, White Publishers: Marketplace Politics in Twentieth-Century African American Literature" examines the complex negotiations behind the production of African American literature. In chapters on Larsen's "Passing," Ishmael Reed's "Mumbo Jumbo," Gwendolyn Brooks's "Children Coming Home," Morrison's "Oprah's Book Club" selections, and Ralph Ellison's "Juneteenth," John K. Young presents the first book-length application of editorial theory to African American literature. Focusing on the manuscripts, drafts, book covers, colophons, and advertisements that trace book production, Young expands upon the concept of socialized authorship and demonstrates how the study of publishing history and practice and African American literary criticism enrich each other. John K. Young is an associate professor of English at Marshall University. His work has appeared in journals such as "College English," "African American Review," and "Critique."
Ständig wachsende Vielfalt der amerikanischen Literatur. Von den Puritanern bis zur Postmoderne beleuchtet das beliebte Standardwerk alle wichtigen Autoren und ihre Werke. Ausführliche Porträts der indianischen und der Chicano-Literatur, der afro-, jüdisch- und asiatisch-amerikanischen Literatur tragen dem für die Literatur Nordamerikas charakteristischen Phänomen der Multikulturalität Rechnung. Die 3. Auflage wurde um jüngste Entwicklungen ergänzt, wie z. B. die Literatur nach 9/11. Mit einem Kapitel zu Literaturkritik und feministischen Literaturstudien.
A major new history of the literary traditions, oral and print, of African-descended peoples in the United States.
In this volume, Lovalerie King and Shirley Moody-Turner have compiled a collection of essays that offer access to some of the most innovative contemporary black fiction while addressing important issues in current African American literary studies. Distinguished scholars Houston Baker, Trudier Harris, Darryl Dickson-Carr, and Maryemma Graham join writers and younger scholars to explore the work of Toni Morrison, Edward P. Jones, Trey Ellis, Paul Beatty, Mat Johnson, Kyle Baker, Danzy Senna, Nikki Turner, and many others. The collection is bracketed by a foreword by novelist and graphic artist Mat Johnson, one of the most exciting and innovative contemporary African American writers, and an afterword by Alice Randall, author of the controversial parody The Wind Done Gone. Together, King and Moody-Turner make the case that diversity, innovation, and canon expansion are essential to maintaining the vitality of African American literary studies.
A record of the darker races.
With her mastery of traditional verse forms and insightful treatment of race, Gwendolyn Brooks carved a unique space for herself within American poetry. This title offers an introduction that reflects on Brooks' legacy, locating her work as a bridge between the poets of the Harlem Renaissance and the poets of the black arts movement.
“You can tell a true war story if you just keep on telling it,” Tim O’Brien writes in The Things They Carried. Widely regarded as the most important novelist to come out of the American war in Viet Nam, O’Brien has kept on telling true war stories not only in narratives that cycle through multiple fictional and non-fictional versions of the war’s defining experiences, but also by rewriting those stories again and again. Key moments of revision extend from early drafts, to the initial appearance of selected chapters in magazines, across typescripts and page proofs for first editions, and through continuing post-publication variants in reprints. How to Revise a True War Story is the first book-length study of O’Brien’s archival papers at the University of Texas’s Harry Ransom Center. Drawing on extensive study of drafts and other prepublication materials, as well as the multiple published versions of O’Brien’s works, John K. Young tells the untold stories behind the production of such key texts as Going After Cacciato, The Things They Carried, and In the Lake of the Woods. By reading not just the texts that have been published, but also the versions they could have been, Young demonstrates the important choices O’Brien and his editors have made about how to represent the traumas of the war in Viet Nam. The result is a series of texts that refuse to settle into a finished or stable form, just as the stories they present insist on being told and retold in new and changing ways. In their lack of textual stability, these variants across different versions enact for O’Brien’s readers the kinds of narrative volatility that is key to the American literature emerging from the war in Viet Nam. Perhaps in this case, you can tell a true war story if you just keep on revising it.
Signs and Cities is the first book to consider what it means to speak of a postmodern moment in African-American literature. Dubey argues that for African-American studies, postmodernity best names a period, beginning in the early 1970s, marked by acute disenchantment with the promises of urban modernity and of print literacy. Dubey shows how black novelists from the last three decades have reconsidered the modern urban legacy and thus articulated a distinctly African-American strain of postmodernism. She argues that novelists such as Octavia Butler, Samuel Delany, Toni Morrison, Gloria Naylor, Ishmael Reed, Sapphire, and John Edgar Wideman probe the disillusionment of urban modernity through repeated recourse to tropes of the book and scenes of reading and writing. Ultimately, she demonstrates that these writers view the book with profound ambivalence, construing it as an urban medium that cannot recapture the face-to-face communities assumed by oral and folk forms of expression.
Wenn der schwarze König fällt ... Als der geachtete Richter Oliver Garland überraschend stirbt, ist sein Sohn Talcott überzeugt, dass ein schwaches Herz die Ursache war. Doch warum wird Talcott ständig nach den «Vorkehrungen» gefragt, die sein Vater für den Todesfall getroffen habe? Warum wird er verfolgt? Und warum fehlen zwei Schachfiguren auf dem sonst so sorgsam gehüteten Schachbrett des Richters? Bald darauf wird ein zweiter Toter aus dem Umfeld Oliver Garlands aufgefunden. Und Talcott sieht sich hineingezogen in die dunkle Vergangenheit seines Vaters. Er muss alles aufs Spiel setzen: seine Ehre, seinen Ruf – und sein Leben. «Seit Tom Wolfe habe ich keinen so vielschichtigen, mitreißenden und bereichernden Roman gelesen wie ‹Schachmatt›.» (USA Today) «Ein prall erzähltes, anekdoten- und facettenreiches Werk.» (Der Spiegel) «Dieses Buch kann man einfach nicht aus der Hand legen.» (New York Times Book Review) «Wunderbar erzählt und clever konstruiert. ‹Schachmatt› ist eine lebendige und vielschichtige Familiensaga, die geschickt verbunden ist mit der Spannung eines Thrillers ... Ein wirklicher Genuss!» (John Grisham) «Man kann dieses Buch einfach nicht aus der Hand legen ... Ein ebenso außergewöhnlicher wie überzeugender Roman.» (New York Times) «Ein unterhaltsamer, eleganter und ideenreicher Roman mit einem wunderbaren Kosmos von Figuren.» (The New York Review of Books) «Scharfsichtige Beobachtungen, gepaart mit einem ernsthaften sozialen Gewissen, das den meisten Büchern dieser Art fehlt ... Ein sprachliches Meisterwerk.» (Time)
Chronicles one hundred years of African-American homosexual literature, from the turn-of-the-century writings of Alice Dunbar Nelson, to the Harlem Renaissance of Langston Hughes, to the emerging sexual liberation movements of the later postwar era as reflected by James Baldwin. Original.
The books that comprise the 'Casebooks in Criticism' series offer edited in-depth readings and critical notes and studies on the most important classic novels. This volume explores Ellison's 'Invisible Man'.
Widely known as the anthology that best unites tradition with innovation, The American Tradition in Literature is proud to enter its fifth decade of leadership among textbook anthologies of American literature. Each volume continues to offer a flexible organization, with literary merit as the guiding principle of selection. The new photos and illustrations illuminate the texts and literary/historical timelines help students put works in context.
A reassessment of the art and achievements of the first black author to win the Pulitzer Prize
This book is about the true history of black Americans, which started about the seventeenth century with indentured servitude in British America and progressed on to the election of Barack Obama as the forty-fourth president of the United States. Between those landmarks were other events and issues, both resolved and ongoing, that were faced by black Americans. Some of these were slavery, reconstruction, development of the black community, participation in the great military conflicts of the United States, racial segregation, and the civil rights movement. Black Americans make up the single largest minority in the United States, the second-largest group after whites in the United States. The Great Migrations, Underground Railroad and Abolitionist, Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights Movement, and Women in Black-American History.

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