First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Boudica has been immortalised throughout history as the woman who dared take on the Romans - an act of vengeance on behalf of her daughters, tribe and enslaved country. Her known life is a rich tapestry of wife, widow, mother, queen and Celtic quasi-Goddess. But beneath this lies a history both dark and shocking, with fresh archaeological evidence adding new depth and terrifying detail to the worn-out myths. From the proud warrior tribes of her East Anglian childhood to the battlefields of her defeat, this is a vividly written and evocatively told story, bringing a wealth of new research and insight to bear on one of the key figures in British history and mythology. From the author of the much-praised Captain Cook comes a major new historical biography; a gripping and enlightening recreation of Boudica, her life, her adversaries, and the turbulent era she bestrode.
"Boudica: Warrior Woman of Roman Britain introduces readers to the life and literary importance of Boudica through juxtaposing her different literary characterizations with those of other women and rebel leaders. This study focuses on our earliest literary evidence, the accounts of Tacitus and Cassius Dio, and investigates their narratives alongside material evidence of late Iron Age and early Roman Britain."--Provided by publisher.
When Roman troops threatened to seize the wealth of the Iceni people, their queen, Boudica, retaliated by inciting a major uprising, allying her tribe with the neighbouring Trinovantes. The ensuing clash is one of the most important - and dramatic - events in the history of Britain, standing testament to what can happen when an insensitive colonial power meets determined resistance from a subjugated people head-on. In this fascinating account of a legendary figure, Miranda Aldhouse-Green raises questions about female power, colonial oppression, and whether Boudica would be seen today as a freedom fighter, terrorist or martyr.
In AD 60, Boudica, war leader of the Eceni, led her people in a final bloody revolt against the occupying armies of Rome. It was the culmination of nearly twenty years of resistance against an occupying force that sought to crush a vibrant, complex civilization and replace it with the laws, taxes and slavery of the Roman Empire. Gloriously imagined, Boudica: Dreaming the Eagle recreates the beginnings of a story so powerful its impact has survived through the ages, recounting the journey to adulthood of Breaca, who at twelve kills her first warrior, and her sensitive, skilful half-brother Bán, who carries with him a vision of the future that haunts his waking hours. In the company of a supreme storyteller, the reader is plunged into the unforgettable world of tribal Britain in the years before the Romans came: a twilight world of Dreamers and the magic of the gods; a world where horses and dogs and the landscape itself become characters in their own right; where warriors fight for honour as much as victory. Above all, it is a world of passion and courage and spectacular, heart-felt heroism pitched against overwhelming odds. Manda Scott's Boudica will tell the extraordinary, resounding story of Britain's first and greatest warrior queen, the woman who remains one of the great female icons - to read it is to discover our history, to learn about ourselves and our heritage.
The woman and the myth disentangled in this fascinating study of a Celtic queen. >
"This is the first book to concentrate exclusively on texts about Boudica and to cover the full chronological range from the first surviving historical account by Tacitus in AD 98 to the triumphant conclusion of Manda Scott's series of novels in 2006. All our knowledge of the ancient British queen Boudica, and her ferocious yet ultimately unsuccessful rebellion against the Romans, is derived from a few accounts in ancient Greek and Latin. Yet they have inspired a flood of history, fictional narrative, drama, and poetry, and there is no indication that the process has ended. This study illuminates and celebrates the rich variety generated by the creative tensions between writers' knowledge and their individual tastes, beliefs, and political or artistic aims and considers whether Boudica's textual metamorphoses are without limits or variations on a distinctive theme bounded by a flexible yet enduring narrative pattern." --Book Jacket.
Meticulously researched and imaginatively wrought, Warrior Queen is the sweeping epic of the infamous Boudica who challenged the vicious might of the Roman Empire. In 43 AD Boudica became the queen of a Celtic tribe and a Roman sympathiser. But after years of loyal service she finds herself brutally betrayed. The fury of her unleashed vengeance threw the Roman Empire's forces into chaos and made her a goddess to her own people. Here, Alan Gold retells the story of Boudica in a novel that embraces all the fiery passion and intrigue of this remarkable woman.
The fourth and final novel in the magnificent saga of Britain’s warrior queen (Boudica – “Bringer of Victory” and the last defender of the Celtic culture) will capture readers’ hearts and minds, as Manda Scott brings the series to a stunning close. It is AD 60 and the flame of rebellion that has been smouldering for 20 years of Roman occupation has flared into a conflagration that will consume the land and all who live in it. There is no going back. Boudica has been flogged and her daughters raped, and her son has burned a Roman watchtower in an act of blatant insurgency. This is the time to act: the Roman governor has marched his legions west to destroy the druidic stronghold of Mona, leaving his capital and a vital seaport hopelessly undefended in the face of twenty-thousand warriors aching for vengeance. But to crush the legions for all time, Boudica must do more than lead her army in the greatest rebellion Britain has ever known. She must find healing for herself, for the land, and for Graine, her 8-year-old daughter, who has taken refuge on Mona. Is revenge worth it under any circumstances, or is the cost more than anyone can bear? Colchester is burning and London is lost without hope. Amidst fire and bloody revolution – a battle that will change the face and spirituality of a nation for centuries to come – Boudica and those around her must find what matters most, now and for ever. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Two thousand years ago, the Roman Empire conquered most of Europe by slaughtering and enslaving millions of ancient Celts. All of Europe, from Britain to as far south as Italy and from what is now France, to as far east as Turkey, was all under Celtic rule. The Romans conquered these ancient Celts with superior military tactics and better weapons. When the Roman legions attacked a Celtic village, they would kill all the men, enslave the children and make whores of the women. In 55BC, Julius Caesar invaded Britain for its wealth in copper and tin. The Britons, or ancient Celts, were made up of many tribes ruled by kings and queens. Unlike the Romans, Celtic women had as many rights as men. On this remote island, the Romans decided to keep the villages in tact and create client kingdoms, taking half of every tribes wealth and production. After the death of King Prasutagus, the Iceni tribe was left to his Queen Boudica. This was something the Romans could not except. For them, women had no right to own property for they were themselves, property to the Romans. When Queen Boudica stood up to the Romans, she was flogged and her two young daughters were raped. In 61 AD, Boudica led a revolt through, Camulodunum, Verulamium and what is now London, killing 70 thousand Romans.
Following the death of her husband, Boudica, queen of the Iceni tribe, is brutally attacked by the occupying Roman forces. Her home is pillaged, her daughters abused, and her land stolen from under her. Fearless, intelligent and determined, she manages to free her daughters and escape, returning with the might of an angry supporting army. With a story packed full of bloody battles, fierce fighting and brutal military tactics, Boudica is an iconic figure of war and womanhood, whose legendary life story still resonates today.
'She was tall and terrible, with a great mass of red hair to her hips... and carried a spear to instil terror in all who saw her.' So wrote Dio Cassius, one of a handful of Romans who commented on the queen of the Iceni who defied the most powerful military nation on earth - and nearly won. Whipped by her Roman overlords and with her two daughters raped, Boudicca went on the warpath in 60AD, uniting tribes under her and wreaking vengeance. Today's Colchester, London and St Albans were all burned to the ground by her marauding army until they were defeated at Mancetter, the 'place of the chariots' by Aulus Plautius. Her end and her grave are unknown. M. J. Trow uses the Roman archives and Celtic mythology to paint a fascinating portrait of this enigmatic woman who was a leader of men and frightened the Romans to death. His son, Taliesin, who holds a Master's Degree in Archaeology, looks at the 'testimony of the spade' to find some surprising conclusions to the many unanswered questions about the queen, whose statue stands alongside the Thames to this day. Boudicca's own reputation has suffered its ups and downs over the centuries, but this book places her firmly on that pedestal alongside her bronze image.
This diachronic study of Boudica serves as a sourcebook of references to Boudica in the early modern period and gives an overview of the ways in which her story was processed and exploited by the different players of the times who wanted to give credence and support to their own belief systems. The author examines the different apparatus of state ideology which processed the social, religious and political representations of Boudica for public absorption and helped form the popular myth we have of Boudica today. By exploring images of the Briton warrior queen across two reigns which witnessed an act of political union and a move from English female rule (under Elizabeth I) to British/Scottish masculine rule (under James VI & I) the author conducts a critical cartography of the ways in which gender, colonialism and nationalism crystallised around this crucial historical figure. Concentrating on the original transmission and reception of the ancient texts the author analyses the historical works of Hector Boece, Raphael Holinshed and William Camden as well as the canonical literary figures of Edmund Spenser, William Shakespeare and John Fletcher. She also looks at aspects of other primary sources not covered in previous scholarship, such as Humphrey Llwyd’s Breuiary of Britayne (1573), Petruccio Ubaldini’s Le Vite delle donne illustri, del regno d’Inghilterra, e del regno di Scotia (1588) and Edmund Bolton’s Nero Caesar (1624). Furthermore, she incorporates archaeological research relating to Boudica.
Everybody knows that Boudica went galloping to battle in a big chariot, and became very angry with her Roman rulers. But in this book readers will find out all the things they didn't know, such as how she burned London to the ground and chopped off the Emperor Claudius's head (well, sort of). Everything you ever wanted to know about the queen with the barmy army.
I Was There... is a perfect introduction for younger readers into stories from the past. I Was There... Roman Britain is a fast-paced and fascinating account of a young girl in the Iceni tribe as Queen Boudica, the fearless leader of the Iceni, rallies her people to march on Roman-occupied Colchester.
The history of one woman's battle against an empire, and the story of how Boudica became one of the most legendary figures in history It is Britain, AD 60. Three Roman towns are in ashes and thousands lie dead. With her new allies, the Trinovantes and the Catuvellauni, Boudica and the Iceni march defiantly towards their enemy seeking one last pivotal victory to drive the Romans from their land forever. Not far away the Roman governor, Gaius Suetonius Paulinus, awaits them with his ground chosen, his strategy decided, and his small force ready to face the great native army. If his strategy is sound they will prevail, if not they will be massacred, losing the province forever. Is it really revenge Boudica wants for the vile humiliations the Romans heaped on her, or is she playing for much higher stakes? Can Paulinus defeat the odds to win the day? To answer these questions, this book reexamines events from a fresh, tactical perspective and produce a clearer picture of a revolt crushed on a newly suggested battle site, offering a new interpretation of a battle that decided 2,000 years of Britain's cultural heritage.
Marion Zimmer Bradley?s beloved Avalon saga continues in ?a fine tribute to Bradley and the real-world triumphs and tragedy of Boudica.?(Publishers Weekly) Epic in its sweep and peopled by the remarkable women who have always inhabited Avalon, Marion Zimmer Bradley?s Ravens of Avalon expands the legendary saga that has enchanted millions of readers over the years and is sure to please Bradley?s loyal readership and anyone who loves wonderfully told stories of history, myth, and fantasy.
AD 57: Caradoc is lost forever, betrayed to Rome and exiled in Gaul, leaving Boudica bereft, to lead the tribes of the west in an increasingly bloody resistance against Roman occupation. Only if she can drive Rome from the land will she find the peace she needs and to do that, she must raise once again the tribes of the east. Her people, the Eceni, languish in the shadow of the Legions, led by a man who proclaims himself King and yet allows slavers to trade freely in his lands. Too notorious to reclaim her own birthright, Boudica strives instead to return her daughters to their heritage. Across the sea, Boudica’s half-brother, Bán, has been named traitor by both sides. He too, seeks peace on a journey that takes him from the dreaming tombs of the ancestors to the cave of a god he no longer serves. Only if Boudica and Bán meet can their people — and all of Britannia — be saved. But the new governor has been ordered to subdue the tribes or die in the attempt, and he has twenty thousand legionaries ready to stop anyone, however determined, from bringing Britain to the edge of revolt....
Britannia: land of mist and magic clinging to the western edge of the Roman Empire. A red-haired queen named Boudica led her people in a desperate rebellion against the might of Rome, an epic struggle destined to consume heroes and cowards, young and old, Roman and Briton . . . and these are their stories. A calculating queen foresees the fires of rebellion in a king's death. A neglected slave girl seizes her own courage as Boudica calls for war. An idealistic tribune finds manhood in a brutal baptism of blood and slaughter. A death-haunted Druid challenges the gods themselves to ensure victory for his people. A conflicted young warrior finds himself torn between loyalties to tribe and to Rome. An old champion struggles for everlasting glory in the final battle against the legions. A pair of fiery princesses fight to salvage the pieces of their mother's dream as the ravens circle. A novel in seven parts, overlapping stories of warriors and peacemakers, queens and slaves, Romans and Britons who cross paths during Boudica's epic rebellion. But who will survive to see the dawn of a new Britannia, and who will fall to feed the ravens?
In this book, David Braund offers a significantly different perspective upon the history of Roman Britain. He concentrates upon the literary evidence, which has been studied to a lesser extent than archaeology in recent years. Close attention to the Greek and Roman sources enables the construction of a new approach to Roman Britain, its history and its archaeology. For the first time, monarchy is identified as a key issue in the history of Roman Britain.

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