Includes no. 53a: British wartime books for young people.
The essays in Yeats Annual No 7 are dedicated to the memory of Richard Ellmann, one of the great pioneer critics of W.B.Yeats. They have been contributed by distinguished colleagues and friends of Richard Ellmann, chosen on his advice. The volume also contains much new material by Yeats himself - a new and virtually complete early draft of his novel The Speckled Bird, here entitled 'The Lilies of the Lord' and two new poems from The Flame of the Spirit manuscript book, given to Maud Gonne in 1981.
In this collection of essays, an international team of outstanding scholars engage with the ideas and methods of Professor Peter Wiseman's past and present work. They provide a sustained response to the work of one of the most widely respected Roman historians of this generation. The contributions range over myth (Corialanus and Remus), the interplay between historiography, literature and myth-making (on Cleopatra, for instance), and art and story-telling at Boscoreale. They explore Roman drama (Pacuvius) and links between drama and Virgil's Aeneid; they discuss Catullus in Bithynia and Cicero on Greek and Roman culture. Professor Wiseman has been at the forefront of innovative research in Roman history, historiography, literature in context, drama and myth, for many years. His work is marked by the combination of a powerful historical imagination with an acute sense of the limitations of our knowledge and of the need to negotiate with the complexity of our sources.
What children read in the Second World War had an immense effect on how they came of age as they faced the new world. This time was unique for British children--parental controls were often relaxed if not absent, and the radio and reading assumed greater significance for most children than they had in the more structured past or were to do in the more crowded future. Owen Dudley Edwards discusses reading, children's radio, comics, films and book-related play-activity in relation to value systems, the child's perspective versus the adult's perspective, the development of sophistication, retention and loss of pre-war attitudes and their post-war fate. British literature is placed in a wider context through a consideration of what British writing reached the USA, and vice versa, and also through an exploration of wartime Europe as it was shown to British children. Questions of leadership, authority, individualism, community, conformity, urban-rural division, ageism, class, race, and gender awareness are explored. In this incredibly broad-ranging book, covering over 100 writers, Owen Dudley Edwards looks at the literary inheritance when the war broke out and asks whether children's literary diet was altered in the war temporarily or permanently. Concerned with the effects of the war as a whole on what children could read during the war and what they made of it, he reveals the implications of this for the world they would come to inhabit.
The classic reference work that provides annually updated information on the countries of the world.
In einer Videothek in einer Kleinstadt inmitten Iowas tauchen seltsame und unheimliche Filmschnipsel auf den Leihkassetten auf. Dunkle und grobkörnige Szenen, die in einer Scheune aufgenommen wurden. Sie dauern nur ein paar Minuten und zeigen möglicherweise S/M-Spiele, vielleicht sogar eine Folterung. Der Videotheksmitarbeiter Jeremy will nichts mit der Sache zu tun haben, doch als die Dorflehrerin Stephanie die Scheune in den Videos wiedererkennt, muss er handeln. Die Suche nach der Wahrheit hinter den Videos führt Jeremy und Stephanie in die Vergangenheit.
This bibliography describes all John Betjeman's known writings, including his own books, contributions to periodicals and to books by others, lectures, and radio and television programmes.
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Originally published in 1953, What Shall I Read Next? lists nearly 2000 works published after 1900, with the compiler's own appreciatory comments on selected items. It was a companion volume to Mr Seymour Smith's English Library. Both books are published on behalf of the National Book League. In his introduction, explaining the scope and purpose of the book, Mr Seymour Smith wrote: 'Some will find it useful merely as a shopping list, reminding them of books they know something about already, and serving as a remembrancer. To others, and particularly to younger readers, it may introduce books which have so far escaped their notice. It is hoped, too, that for booksellers and librarians it will have a practical use as a desk-book, for answering enquiries, for serving as a check list for stock, and for use as a reference book when memory fails'.
Elizabeth Leane's Reading Popular Physics is a valuable contribution to our understanding of the nature and implications of physics popularizations. Focusing particularly on five bestselling books-A Brief History of Time, The First Three Minutes, Chaos, Complexity, and The Dancing Wu Li Masters-Leane analyzes the textual strategies by which popularizers of science influence the public. Her book offers readers a fresh perspective on this highly visible and influential genre.
Everything you need to know about serials librarianship—in one handy volume! For library science students and library professionals, Introduction to Serials Work for Library Technicians is a practical, how-to-do-it text that shows you how to perform the behind-the-scenes tasks your job requires. This primer walks you through the entire process of serials management for both larger libraries with automated serials management systems as well as small school and public libraries that must handle their serials manually. From an introduction to serials work to the latest in technology for archiving, this book will ensure that your library customers are not inconvenienced by inaccuracies or inefficient organization. Introduction to Serials Work for Library Technicians will benefit anyone who handles serials in a library since it covers all aspects of serials: acquisitions, organization, check-ins, and cataloging. This book addresses the complications that occur working with a form of publication that can include any medium from newspapers to CD-Rom and can be published as often as every day or as infrequently as once a year. Difficulties include title changes, serial merges and splits, suspensions and cessations of publication, and changes in format, and this volume will show you how to find the solutions to these situations. Here’s a sample of what is explored in this book: acquisitions—how to locate, find bibliographic information on, and verify the title of a desired serial ordering—types of orders, new subscription orders, and back-ordering receiving—checking in serials, recording holdings information, using Kardex cards, and using an automated check-in system cataloging—using holding and union lists, creating and using online catalogues, and cataloguing standards and internet serials processing—shelving policies, types of shelving, and how to shelve claims, binding, and renewals Intended primarily as a textbook for students in library sciences programs, this book will also serve very well as a general reference for experienced or novice library technicians or other staff members who find themselves managing serials or automating their system. The book's complete glossary, bibliography, numerous definitions, and tables, as well as the real-life examples throughout this manual will help you navigate the challenges of record-keeping, claiming, and cataloguing serials in any library.
According to a profile in The Guardian, Mary Midgley is 'the foremost scourge of scientific pretensions in this country; someone whose wit is admired even by those who feel she sometimes oversteps the mark'. Considered one of Britain's finest philosophers, Midgley exposes the illogical logic of poor doctrines that shelter themselves behind the prestige of science. Always at home when taking on the high priests of evolutionary theory - Dawkins, Wilson and their acolytes - she has famously described evolution as 'the creation-myth of our age'. In Evolution as a Religion, she examines how science comes to be used as a substitute for religion and points out how badly that role distorts it. As ever, her argument is flawlessly insightful: a punchy, compelling, lively indictment of these misuses of science. Both the book and its author are true classics of our time.
Since the appearance of The Lord of the Rings in 1954, J. R. R. Tolkien’s works have always sold briskly, appealing to a wide and diverse audience of intellectuals, religious believers, fantasy enthusiasts, and science fiction aficionados. Now, Peter Jackson’s film version of Tolkien’s trilogy—with its accompanying Rings-related paraphernalia and publicity—is playing a unique role in the dissemination of Tolkien’s imaginative creation to the masses. Yet, for most readers and viewers, the underlying meaning of Middle-earth has remained obscure. Bradley Birzer has remedied that with this fresh study. In J. R. R. Tolkien’s Sanctifying Myth: Understanding Middle-earth, Birzer explains the surprisingly specific religious symbolism that permeates Tolkien’s Middle-earth legendarium. He also explores the social and political views that motivated the Oxford don, ultimately situating Tolkien within the Christian humanist tradition represented by Thomas More and T. S. Eliot, Dante and C. S. Lewis. Birzer argues that through the genre of myth Tolkien created a world that is essentially truer than the one we think we see around us every day, a world that transcends the colorless disenchantment of our postmodern age. “A small knowledge of history,” Tolkien once wrote, “depresses one with the sense of the everlasting weight of human iniquity.” As Birzer demonstrates, Tolkien’s recognition of evil became mythologically manifest in the guise of Ringwraiths, Orcs, Sauron, and other dark beings. But Tolkien was ultimately optimistic: even weak, bumbling hobbits and humans, as long as they cling to the Good, can finally prevail. Bradley Birzer has performed a great service in elucidating Tolkien’s powerful moral vision.

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