Excerpt from Burke's Texas Almanac and Immigrants Handbook: With Which Is Incorporated Hanford's Texas State Register I. A Partial Eclipse of the Moon. April 22, in the morning, visible from the Mississippi Valley to the Pacific Coast. Size. About 1 digit. (see Table.) About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
Terry Jordan explores how German immigrants in the nineteenth century influenced and were influenced by the agricultural life in the areas of Texas where they settled. His findings both support the notion of ethnic distinctiveness and reveal the extent to which German Texans adopted the farming techniques of their Southern Anglo neighbors.
For fifty years the progressive Coleman-Fulton Pasture Company, popularly known as the Taft Ranch, led in the development of South Texas, and in the early twentieth century achieved national and international repute for its contributions to agriculture. The story of the ranch reaches its climax as the firm is absorbed into the community growing up around it—the same community the ranch had nurtured to an unprecedented prosperity. In 1961 A. Ray Stephens visited Taft, Texas, and received permission to use the dust-covered records, which for thirty years had been closed to historians. These records, plus the valuable supplementary material in the Fulton Collection at the University of Texas, have enabled the author to tell the complete story of the ranch from its inception in 1880 to its dissolution in 1930. In 1880, with a fifty-year charter, the Coleman-Fulton Pasture Company was legally born as a private corporation. For the duration of its history this company aided the advancement of South Texas through effective utilization of the fertile land, through development of agriculture and related industries, and through encouragement of settlers and curious visitors to the Coastal Bend region. Its history is a long, determined fight against severe drought, cattle disease, and financial insolvency. Guided by farsighted men who believed in experimentation in agriculture—and who also promoted the establishment of stores, schools, colleges, churches, and industrial plants—the company not only survived but prospered, and by 1920 its owners could survey their vast properties with well-earned satisfaction. The struggling cattle firm of 1880 had expanded into a multi-interest, profitable corporation that had established and supervised most of the industries in Taft, Texas. Stephens' well-documented 1964 study had been long needed. During the three decades preceding it, the ranch had been well-nigh forgotten; only the handful of people, then still living, who had worked on the ranch had kept its memory fresh, while the voluminous company records remained inaccessible. The author supplemented his study of company records and newspapers with archival material, government records, and information obtained during hours of interviewing. His book will insure for the Taft Ranch its deservedly prominent position in Texas history. The lively introduction was written by Joe B. Frantz (1917–1993) who, in his role of Professor of History at the University of Texas, encouraged the study and watched its development.
Running more than 1,200 miles from headwaters in eastern New Mexico through the middle of Texas to the Gulf of Mexico, the Brazos River has frustrated developers for nearly two centuries. This environmental history of the Brazos traces the techniques that engineers and politicians have repeatedly used to try to manage its flow. The vast majority of projects proposed or constructed in this watershed were failures, undone by the geology of the river as much as the cost of improvement. When developers erected locks, the river changed course. When they built large-scale dams, floodwaters overflowed the concrete rims. When they constructed levees, the soils collapsed. Yet lawmakers and laypeople, boosters and engineers continued to work toward improving the river and harnessing it for various uses. Through the plight of the Brazos River Archer illuminates the broader commentary on the efforts to tame this nation’s rivers as well as its historical perspectives on development and technology. The struggle to overcome nature, Archer notes, reflects a quintessentially American faith in technology.
Kristinas, Celestes und Julianas Familie ist die Sekte »Kinder Gottes«, in der sie den Misshandlungen und dem Missbrauch durch erwachsene Sektenmitglieder hilflos ausgesetzt sind. Die Schwestern werden schon früh voneinander getrennt und leben in verschiedenen Missionsstationen der Gemeinschaft. Sie träumen von einem Wiedersehen, fürchten aber den Zorn Gottes, wenn sie sich dem Willen der »Familie« widersetzen. Schonungslos offen erzählen die Schwestern von den seelischen Grausamkeiten und der Gewalt unter dem Deckmantel des Glaubens. Ihre Geschichte ist voller schmerzlicher Erinnerungen, aber auch das Zeugnis einer mutigen Befreiung und dem Weg in ein neues Leben.
»Leben auf dem Mississippi«, der 1883 erschienene, autobiographische Bericht beschreibt Mark Twains Leben als Lotse von 1857 bis 1861 auf verschiedenen Mississippi-Dampfern und das bunte, abenteuerliche Leben auf dem Fluss. »Nach dem fernen Westen« schildert seine Erlebnisse und Eindrücke, die er während einer zwanzigtägigen Fahrt mit der Postkutsche von St. Joseph nach Carson City, Nevadas Hauptstadt, erlebte.

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