Cassidy's Run is the riveting story of one of the best-kept secrets of the Cold War—an espionage operation mounted by Washington against the Soviet Union that ran for twenty-three years. At the highest levels of the government, its code name was Operation shocker. Lured by a double agent working for the United States, ten Russian spies, including a professor at the University of Minnesota, his wife, and a classic "sleeper" spy in New York City, were sent by Moscow to penetrate America's secrets. Two FBI agents were killed, and secret formulas were passed to the Russians in a dangerous ploy that could have spurred Moscow to create the world's most powerful nerve gas. Cassidy's Run tells this extraordinary true story for the first time, following a trail that leads from Washington to Moscow, with detours to Florida, Minnesota, and Mexico. Based on documents secret until now and scores of interviews in the United States and Russia, the book reveals that: ¸ more than 4,500 pages of classified documents, including U.S. nerve gas formulas, were passed to the Soviet Union in exchange for hundreds of thousands of dollars ¸ an "Armageddon code," a telephone call to a number in New York City, was to alert the sleeper spy to an impending nuclear attack—a warning he would transmit to the Soviets by radio signal from atop a rock in Central Park ¸ two FBI agents were killed when their plane crashed during surveillance of one of the Soviet spies as he headed for the Canadian border ¸ secret "drops" for microdots were set up by Moscow from New York to Florida to Washington More than a cloak-and-dagger tale, Cassidy's Run is the spellbinding story of one ordinary man, Sergeant Joe Cassidy, not trained as a spy, who suddenly found himself the FBI's secret weapon in a dangerous clandestine war. ADVANCE PRAISE FOR CASSIDY'S RUN "Cassidy's Run shows, once again, that few writers know the ins and outs of the spy game like David Wise. . . his research is meticulous in this true story of espionage that reads like a thriller." —Dan Rather "The Master hsa done it again. David Wise, the best observer and chronicler of spies there is, has told another gripping story. This one comes from the cold war combat over nerve gas and is spookier than ever because it's all true." —Jim Lehrer
A Day in the Death of Dorothea Cassidy is the third novel in the Inspector Ramsay series by Ann Cleeves, author of the Shetland and Vera Stanhope crime series. For Dorothea Cassidy Thursdays were special. Every week she would look forward to the one day she could call her own, and would plan to visit people she wanted to see as a welcome respite from the routine duties that being a vicar's wife entailed. But one Thursday in June was to be more special than any other. It was the day that Dorothea Cassidy was strangled. As the small town of Otterbridge prepares for its summer carnival, Inspector Stephen Ramsay begins a painstaking reconstruction of Dorothea's last hours. He soon discovers that she had taken on a number of deserving cases – a sick and lonely old woman, a disturbed adolescent, a compulsive gambler, a single mother with a violent boyfriend and a child in care – and even her close family have their secrets to hide. All these people are haunted, in one way or another, by Dorothea's goodness. But which of them could have possibly wanted her dead? It is not until a second body is discovered that Ramsay starts to understand how Dorothea lived – and why she died. With the carnival festivities in full swing and dusk falling in Otterbridge, Ramsay's murder investigation reaches its chilling climax . . .
Strong men need strong women to fulfill their destinies. To Running Horse, the Cheyenne war chief, life is one battle after another. He fights the Absaroka and Johnson County cattle ranchers before engaging in the ultimate battle to win the heart of a woman. Elina Lavaux is that woman. She's a strong pioneer who succeeds in her dream to breed horses on her own ranch, in a time when women couldn't even hold land without a man's name on the deed. Twenty years later, the old tribal ways are gone, but the spirit of the warrior remains strong in their sons. The young men must overcome prejudice and personal demons to find love, thus fulfilling the prophecy of the Black Stallion.
Das Kultbuch über die Essenz des Laufens Quenton Cassidy hat einen Traum: Einmal die Meile unter der magischen Grenze von vier Minuten zu laufen. Er fliegt von der Uni und verlässt seine Freundin, um sich unter Anleitung des Olympiasiegers Bruce Denton in der Einöde auf den Lauf seines Lebens vorzubereiten: ein Kopf-an-Kopf-Rennen mit dem besten Meilenläufer aller Zeiten. Ursprünglich im Selbstverlag erschienen, wurde John L. Parkers Roman zur Bibel für Generationen von Läufern. Erstmals liegt er nun auf Deutsch vor. Ein aussergewöhnlicher Insiderbericht aus dem Leben eines Eliteläufers, ein intensives und authentisches Stück Literatur, voller Rhythmus, Leidenschaft und Humor. 'Der beste Roman, der je über das Laufen geschrieben wurde.' Runner's World John L. Parker hat als Anwalt, Journalist und Redenschreiber gearbeitet. Als Läufer hat er zahlreiche Titel gewonnen. Er lebt in Gainesville, Florida, und Bar Harbor, Maine.
"When someone asks 'Where does [Kerouac] get that stuff?' say: 'From you!' He lay awake all night listening with eyes and ears. A night of a thousand years. Heard it in the womb, heard it in the cradle, heard it in school , heard it on the floor of life's stock exchange where dreams are traded for gold." —Henry Miller One of the dozen books written by Jack Kerouac in the early and mid-1950s, Maggie Cassidy was not published until 1959, after the appearance of On the Road had made its author famous overnight, Long out of print, this touching novel of adolescent love in a New England mill town, with its straight-forward narrative structure, is one of Kerouac's most accesible works. It is a remarkable , bittersweet evocation of the awkwardness and the joy of growing up in America.
Techniques in Speech Acoustics provides an introduction to the acoustic analysis and characteristics of speech sounds. The first part of the book covers aspects of the source-filter decomposition of speech, spectrographic analysis, the acoustic theory of speech production and acoustic phonetic cues. The second part is based on computational techniques for analysing the acoustic speech signal including digital time and frequency analyses, formant synthesis, and the linear predictive coding of speech. There is also an introductory chapter on the classification of acoustic speech signals which is relevant to aspects of automatic speech and talker recognition. The book intended for use as teaching materials on undergraduate and postgraduate speech acoustics and experimental phonetics courses; also aimed at researchers from phonetics, linguistics, computer science, psychology and engineering who wish to gain an understanding of the basis of speech acoustics and its application to fields such as speech synthesis and automatic speech recognition.
Butch Cassidy and his gang pulled off the longest sequence of successful bank and train robberies in the history of the American West, then disbanded and scattered across North and South America to meet their colorful ends. Or did they?
Who was Butch Cassidy? He was born Robert LeRoy Parker in 1866 in Utah. And, as everyone knows, after years of operating with a sometime gang of outlaws known as the Wild Bunch, he and the Sundance Kid escaped to South America, only to die in a 1908 shootout with a Bolivian cavalry troop. But did he die? Some say that he didn’t die in Bolivia, but returned to live out a quiet life in Spokane, Washington where he died peacefully in 1937. In interviews with the author, scores of his friends and relatives and their descendants in Wyoming, Utah, and Washington concurred, claiming that Butch Cassidy had returned from Bolivia and lived out the remainder of his life in Spokane under the alias William T. Phillips. In 1934 William T. Phillips wrote an unpublished manuscript, an (auto) biography of Butch Cassidy, “The Bandit Invincible, the Story of Butch Cassidy.” Larry Pointer, marshalling an overwhelming amount of evidence, is convinced that William T. Phillips and Butch Cassidy were the same man. The details of his life, though not ending spectacularly in a Bolivian shootout, are more fascinating than the until-now accepted version of the outlaw’s life. There was a shootout with the Bolivian cavalry, but, according to Butch (Phillips), he was able to escape under the cover of darkness, sadly leaving behind his longtime friend, the Sundance Kid, dead. Then came Paris, a minor bit of facelifting, Michigan, marriage, Arizona, Mexico with perhaps a tour as a sharpshooter for Pancho Villa, Alaska, and at last the life of a businessman in Spokane. In between there were some quiet return trips to visit old friends and haunts in Wyoming and Utah. The author, with the invaluable help of Cassidy’s autobiography, has pieced together the full and final story of a remarkable outlaw—from his Utah Mormon origins, through his escapades of banditry and his escape to South America, to his self-rehabilitation as William T. Phillips, a productive and respected member of society.
Sergeant James Douglas and his partner are investigating the murder of a security guard at the Laverty Farm Equipment Company that occurred during an apparent robbery. As the investigation unfolds, it is apparent that the motive for his death is more than robbery. Soon, the detectives have reason to believe that other murders may be related to the same killer and this might only be the beginning. The investigation takes them to Cincinnati, Ohio where the murder of an honorable man occurs soon after they arrive. The murderer, now classified as a serial killer, is on a rampage. He has a knack for tracking and terrorizing his victims before he moves in for the kill. He is able to conceal himself and at first appears to be a crazed psychopath, but this monster has the cunning and strength of a wild animal. It is up to Sergeant Douglas to find out what has set this beast loose and how to bring him to justice.
Robert Leroy Parker’s transformation into Butch Cassidy wasn’t immediate. He worked on ranches as a cowboy, was a butcher for a time, and finally chose a path of crime in the American West in the late 1800s. Cassidy’s involvement with the band of outlaws known as the Wild Bunch and later partnership with Harry Longabaugh, the “Sundance Kid,” resulted in a crime spree and a life on the run. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid fled to South America, where their fate remains a mystery. This lively, well-researched volume—filled with fascinating photographs and fact boxes—provides a gripping account of a fugitive’s life and legend.
Presents an account of the life, times, and crimes of the legendary outlaw
Evoking Krakauer's Into the Wild, Dan Schultz tells the extraordinary true story of desperado survivalists, a brutal murder, and vigilante justice set against the harsh backdrop of the Colorado wilderness On a sunny May morning in 1998 in Cortez, Colorado, three desperados in a stolen truck opened fire on the town cop, shooting him twenty times; then they blasted their way past dozens of police cars and disappeared into 10,000 square miles of the harshest wilderness terrain on the North American continent. Self-trained survivalists, the outlaws eluded the most sophisticated law enforcement technology on the planet and a pursuit force that represented more than seventy-five local, state, and federal police agencies with dozens of swat teams, U.S. Army Special Forces, and more than five hundred officers from across the country. Dead Run is the first in-depth account of this sensational case, replete with overbearing local sheriffs, Native American trackers, posses on horseback, suspicion of vigilante justice and police cover-ups, and the blunders of the nation's most exalted crime-fighters pursuing outlaws into territory in which only they could survive.

Best Books