Dialogue is one of the best vehicles for learning how to think, how to be reasonable, how to make moral decisions and how to understand another person's point of view. It is supremely flexible, instructional, collaborative, and rigorous. At its very best, dialogue is one of the best ways for participants to learn good habits of thinking. There is also substantial evidence that teachers currently talk too much in classes, often only waiting .8 seconds after asking a question before jumping in with the answer if a student doesn't quickly volunteer. This book guides teachers through the different types of dialogue and how they can be used to enhance students' learning.
If done incorrectly, feedback has minimal effect or even a negative effect. In this book, the authors show how to avoid the common mistakes teachers make in giving feedback. The authors argue that effective feedback answers these three questions: What am I trying to achieve? How much progress have I made so far? And what should I do next?
Using feedback to enhance learning Feedback has the potential to dramatically improve student learning – if done correctly. In fact, providing high quality feedback is one of the most critical roles of a teacher. Challenging Learning Through Feedback provides educators with the tools they need to craft high quality feedback and avoid common mistakes. Readers will learn How to know when feedback is (and isn’t) working How to design feedback so that it answers three essential questions Practical strategies for crafting Learning Intentions and Success Criteria Strategies, templates, and rubrics for providing feedback How to teach students to give high quality feedback to themselves and others
Better than Best Practice offers a new way of thinking about classroom practice, professional development, and improving teaching and learning. This companion book and website together offer a selection of rich and realistic video-based case studies, context and narrative, step-by-step guidance through key issues, and commentary and debate from a range of expert contributors. Carefully chosen video clips from primary school literacy lessons show real teachers in a variety of often knotty situations: classroom conversations that take unexpected turns; grappling with assessment; managing disagreements, to name a few. The book explores the educational potential of classroom talk and, in particular, the promise and problems of dialogic pedagogy. With an emphasis on the complexity and ‘messiness’ of teaching, Better than Best Practice considers how to learn from observing and discussing practice in order to develop professional judgment. It offers practical advice on how to organise and facilitate video-based professional development in which teachers share their practice with colleagues in order to learn from one another’s challenges, problems, dilemmas and breakthroughs. This exciting new resource argues that critical discussions of practice, which highlight dilemmas instead of prescribing solutions, help to develop and support thoughtful, flexible, and insightful practitioners: an approach that is better than best practice.
Challenging Learning offers advice and techniques for helping children of all ages develop into confident, thoughtful and independent learners. Based around the acronym ASK (Attitudes, Skills and Knowledge), this essential guide explores attitudes, skills and knowledge to learning. It considers the strategies that can help teachers to challenge their pupils to think more skilfully and logically and how to develop these techniques more effectively. Drawing on the latest research from some of the most respected experts in the field, Challenging Learning encourages independent thinking and a spirit of inquiry in pupils of all ages. Through the use of rich examples of classroom interactions, this book offers strategies that will help pupils to produce their own thoughtful conclusions, develop their own concepts, examine logic and remain open to alternatives. Highlights include: effective teaching strategies including FACTS, the Teaching Target Model and the Learning Pit Models; up-to-date research and theory from leading experts; practical suggestions and principles to help you design and develop your own lessons. For everyone living or working with children – particularly teachers, parents, carers and youth workers - this book shows some of the best ways to enhance children’s learning, including how to question, praise, give feedback and encourage more effectively.
‘I recommend this book to anyone wishing to help children learn. In it you will find some lovely ideas for improving the way we encourage, support and praise all young people.’ Professor Carol Dweck, author of Mindset, Stanford University, USA ‘James has developed a rare skill for blending arresting anecdotes, hard-edged research and practical advice into a truly compelling narrative.’ Professor Barry Hymer, author of the Gifted and Talented Pocket Book, Cumbria University, UK Over the last 20 years James Nottingham has studied how children learn. He has taught every age group in both primary and secondary schools, helped deaf teenagers deal with anger and isolation and even done philosophy with three-year-olds. In this inspiring, humorous, and practical book he shows what you can do to help children of all ages develop into confident, thoughtful and independent learners. Based around the acronym ASK, this book explores attitudes, skills and knowledge to learning – what is required and how to develop these skills more effectively. It shows how to encourage independent thinking and a spirit of inquiry in your children. Highlights include: the dangers of calling our children clever, bright and gifted; the best ways to teach wisdom; how to help children excel in exams; why curiosity did not kill the cat. With a foreword written by John Hattie, Encouraging Learning draws on research from some of the most respected experts on thinking and learning to identify the best ways to help children learn more effectively, efficiently and co-operatively. For everyone living or working with children – particularly teachers, parents, carers and youth workers - this book shows you some of the best ways to enhance children’s learning, including how to question, praise, and encourage more effectively.
Since the publication of the first edition of Children as Philosophers in 2002 there has been an enormous growth of interest in philosophy with children. This fully revised second edition suggests ways in which you can introduce philosophical enquiry to your Personal, Social and Health Education and Citizenship teaching and across the curriculum. The book demonstrates children’s capacities to engage in sophisticated processes of dialogue and enquiry about a wide range of issues and underlines the importance of listening to children’s ideas. The author discusses the pleasures and challenges for adults in managing discussion and responding to children's claims to knowledge in the philosophical arena. The author also addresses the well-established Philosophy for Children movement, developed in the USA and Australia and links this to the principles of Every Child Matters. This fascinating book is an invaluable resource for all teachers and trainees seeking a thoughtful and contextualised introduction to the theory and practice of philosophical enquiry with children, including: expanded discussion on children’s voice and participation at school the theory and practice of dialogical approaches to teaching and learning new evidence of the educational impact of philosophy with children in the classroom what should inform the professional choice of resources for teaching philosophy wider international debates about learning styles, skills and intelligence. New reports are presented from children, teachers, from the fields of Gifted and Talented and Special Needs Education and from international research carried out over the last five years.
The early childhood programme of Reggio Emilia in Italy is acclaimed as one of the best education systems in the world and this book offers the unique insight of Carlina Rinaldi, the former director of the municipal early childhood centres in Reggio Emilia and successor to Loris Malaguzzi, one of the twentieth century's leading pedagogical thinkers. Rinaldi has an enviable international reputation for her contribution to the Reggio approach and has given talks on the topic around the world. A collection of Rinaldi's most important works, this book is organized thematically with a full introduction contextualising each piece. It closes with an interview by series editors Peter Moss and Gunilla Dahlberg, looking at Rinaldi's current work and reflections on Reggio's past, present and future. Much of this material is previously unpublished and focuses on a number of questions: What were the ideas and legacy of Loris Malaguzzi? What is unique about Reggio Emilia? What are the issues in education today and what does it mean to be a teacher? How can educators most effectively make use of creativity?
Transforming Historical Trauma, by David S. Derezotes, helps readers understand the causes and treatment of historical trauma at an individual, group, and community level and demonstrates how a participatory, strengths-based approach can work effectively in its treatment. The first to offer a combination of theory, literature review, and practice knowledge on dialogue, this book begins with a definition of historical trauma and transformation, includes the dialogue necessary to aid in transformation (such as self-care, self-awareness and professional self- development). The author proposes six key models of dialogue practice—psychodynamic, cognitive behavioral, experiential, transpersonal, biological, and ecological—and shows how these models can be used to help transform sociohistorical trauma in clients. He then applies these six dialogue models to five common practice settings, including work with community divides, social justice work, peace and conflict work, dialogues with populations across the lifespan, and community therapy.
Territorial Development and Action Research examines the role of action research within fields such as territorial development and innovation. Most researchers analyse these fields from the outside, developing a theoretical understanding of what should be done, but not of how to do it. Based on their own experience of territorial development processes from the inside out, James Karlsen and Miren Larrea argue that filling the gap regarding social relations in the innovation process makes it possible for researchers to engage in the processes taking place in the territory, thereby revealing how to make things work. This book will help researchers face the pressure to engage and play a useful role in the development of their host regions. It will help policy makers to continuously learn and redefine policy approaches and bring about collaboration through networks, programs and projects where researchers and practitioners in regional, local and urban development work together to construct territorial development. Readers will acquire a better understanding of micro-territorial development processes and the roles played by individuals and coalitions in endogenous development processes.
In The Art of Dialogue in Coaching, Reinhard Stelter invites readers to engage in transformative and fruitful dialogues in everyday working life, and provides the theory and tools for them to be able to do so. Presented in three parts, the book provides a complete overview of the importance of dialogue and how it can be utilised. Part I, Theoretical basis, examines third-generation coaching as a collaborative dialogue form, the societal context of the coaching process and the concept of identity in modern society. Part II, Basic themes of fruitful dialogue, examines meaning-making, value and the narrative perspective, and their significance in creating a new dialogue culture. Finally, Part III, Reflections on dialogue practice, explores the art of being a supporting dialogue guide, drawing on a number of theoretical perspectives and focusing on developing relational competencies. Stelter emphasises that taking the time to linger opens new possibilities for fundamental self-insight, and clearly explains how dialogue provides us with a framework for acting in the world with personal integrity. The Art of Dialogue in Coaching will be an essential guide for coaches in practice and in training, coaching psychologists and professionals with a coaching role, including mentors, consultants and leaders. In particular, it will appeal to those looking to conduct dialogue as an art form, enhancing their work as a co-creative and collaborative guide.
Posthumanism represents a significant new research direction both for International Relations and the social sciences. It emerges from questions about inter-species relations which challenge dominant perceptions of what it means to be human. Rather than seeing the human species as ‘in nature’ posthumanist thinking considers the species as ‘of nature’. The work of posthumanist thinkers has sought to dispute accepted notions of what it means to be human, raising profound questions about our relations with the rest of nature. The volume commences with an overview of the influence thinkers have had on the development of posthumanist thinking. Key ideas in International Relations are interrogated and reconceptualised and specific case studies are presented with a focus on inter-species relations. The work allows for a consideration of the limits of the posthumanist move and provides space for critics to argue that such an approach opens the discipline up to a biological determinism, and that a focus on inter-human relations should mark the boundaries of the discipline. The essays collected in this volume provide an overview of contributions from posthumanist thinkers with the particular intention of providing a succinct introduction to the area and should appeal to scholars and students in Politics, IR and philosophy.
Citizens in our deeply, angrily divided world desperately need peaceful and productive ways of relating to each other. Rooted in four decades of intense experience in deep-seated human conflicts, Saunders presents a peaceful way of transforming destructive relationships and designing change.
Down to earth, practical and direct, Active Learning Through Formative Assessment gives you the essential 'how to' information you need, with clear principles and theory to underpin the wealth of practical advice and examples. - Maximises pupil engagement, effective dialogue and reflective thinking - Packed with practical advice across all subjects from early years to secondary - Clearly explains how to use formative assessment to promote active learning in primary and secondary classrooms - Well-chosen examples flag up the practical 'implementation' issues across the full age and subject range. They exemplify effective learning objectives, clear success criteria, talk partner techniques, effective questioning, quality discussion with pupils, and self- and peerevaluation of work - Shows how best to support teachers in implementing eff ective formative assessment across the whole school, a cluster of schools or any other educational setting, and how best to support class teachers in their journey through the culture and practice of formative assessment Themes include: - how to develop a 'growth mindset', so that pupils enjoy challenges rather than avoid them - how popular strategies such as 'thinking skills' and 'building learning power' complement formative assessment - planning with key skills
Realize the potential of quality questioning for student thinking and learning Quality questioning begins with the preparation of questions that engage all students in thinking and culminates in the facilitation of dialogue that takes learning deeper. Completely updated, this second edition reflects new research, addresses technological and policy changes, and includes new insights from the authors’ work with teachers. Designed for immediate classroom use, readers will find: Graphics, tools, and strategies to develop student skills and create a powerful learning culture QR codes that link to more than twenty new classroom videos Tools and strategies to support personal reflection, classroom observations, and collaborative dialogue
Embrace challenge and celebrate Eureka! Challenge makes learning more interesting. That’s one of the reasons to encourage your students to dive into the learning pit—a state of cognitive conflict that forces students to think more deeply, critically, and strategically until they discover their “eureka” moment. Nottingham, an internationally known author and consultant, will show you how to promote challenge, dialogue, and a growth mindset through: Practical strategies that guide students through the four stages of the Learning Challenge Engaging lesson plan ideas and classroom activities Inspiring examples from Learning Challenges across the world
Akira Akabayashi presents the first book to explore the conversation on bioethics that is taking place between scholars and practitioners from the East and West: the first book in the discipline of bioethics for the globalized world of the future. An international team of experts address emerging issues in bioethics, focus on new developments and their potential for change, and set the agenda for the future. The contributors discuss and debate bioethical issuesthat arise from new medical technologies such as regenerative medicine, enhancement, research ethics, and synthetic biology, and address challenging dilemmas that result from the globalization of social change, such as transplantation tourism, public health ethics, care in the aging society, andprofessionalism. It presents essays by leading researchers in the field alongside those of promising new scholars, establishing a cross-cultural, cross-generational dialogue.
The SAGE Handbook of International Higher Education examines the internationalization of higher education from a marginal to a core dimension of higher education worldwide. This mainstreaming of internationalization is a fascinating phenomenon: new concepts, programs, providers, and methods of delivery are emerging; impressive national and regional scholarship programs have been established; radical reforms have been undertaken to make higher education globally competitive; and mobility of students and scholars has increased around the world. This groundbreaking handbook serves as a guide to internationalization of higher education and offers new strategies for its further development and expansion in the years to come. With a decidedly global approach, this volume brings together leading experts from around the world to illustrate the increasing importance of internationalization. The text encompasses the diversity and breadth of internationalization of higher education in all its thematic facets and regional impacts.
Learning and Teaching Around the World is a wide-ranging introduction to diverse experiences, practices and developments in global primary education. It explores different contexts for children’s learning, and methods and purposes of primary education, in settings across Africa, Asia, Europe, the Americas and Australasia, and addresses wider issues such as the rise of refugee learners and large multi-grade classes. With an explicit focus on comparative and international studies and improving the knowledge, understanding and practice of effective pedagogies for children’s learning, this book reflects on key issues such as: Standards for learner-centred education Patterns of inclusion and exclusion Defining ‘teacher professionalism’ The impact of global education agendas Language policy for schooling and assessment Learning and Teaching Around the World is an essential text for those wishing to develop a critical understanding of the experiences of primary teachers and children around the world. Aimed at both undergraduate and postgraduate education studies students, the scope of this book will support all students in developing knowledge of primary education and of the diverse needs of learners in an era of global movement of children and families.
Now available in a new second edition, Working World: Careers in International Education, Exchange, and Development offers an engaging guide for cause-oriented people dedicated to begin or enhance careers in the now burgeoning fields of international affairs. Mueller and Overmann expand their original dialogue between a career veteran and a young professional to address issues that recognize the meteoric rise of social media and dramatic geopolitical events. They explore how the idea of an international career has shifted: nearly every industry taking on more and more international dimensions, while international skills—linguistic ability, intercultural management, and sensitivity—become ever more highly prized by potential employers. This second edition of Working World offers ten new and four significantly updated profiles as well as new and expanded concepts that include work-life balance, the importance of informational interviews, moving on, and key building blocks for international careers.Like the award-winning first edition, Working World is a rare and valuable resource to students and graduates interested in careers in international affairs, mid-career professionals who want to make a career change or shift, as well as guidance counselors and career center specialists at universities.

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