Community media journalists are, in essence, 'filling in the gaps' left by mainstream news outlets. Forde's extensive 10 year study now develops an understanding of the journalistic practices at work in independent and community news organisations. Alternative media has never been so widely written about until now.
"A provocative, inspiring and challenging intervention in both journalism and media studies.... Alternative Journalism is that rare book that services students as much as scholars. It widens the trajectory of media studies and creates different modes of reading, writing and thinking... It offers an alternative history beyond the tales of great men, great newspapers, great editors and great technologies. It adds value and content to overused and ambiguous words such as "community" and "citizenship" and captures the spark of new information environments." - THE, (Times Higher Education) Alternative Journalism investigates and analyses the diverse forms and genres of journalism that have arisen as challenges to mainstream news coverage. From the radical content of emancipatory media to the dizzying range of citizen journalist blogs and fanzine subcultures, this book charts the historical and cultural practices of this diverse and globalized phenomenon. This exploration goes to the heart of journalism itself, prompting a critical inquiry into the epistemology of news, the professional norms of objectivity, the elite basis of journalism and the hierarchical commerce of news production. In investigating the challenges to media power presented by alternative journalism, Atton addresses not just the issues of politics and empowerment but also the journalism of popular culture and the everyday. The result is essential reading for students of journalism - both mainstream and alternative.
The Routledge Companion to Alternative and Community Media provides an authoritative and comprehensive examination of the diverse forms, practices and philosophies of alternative and community media across the world. The volume offers a multiplicity of perspectives to examine the reasons why alternative and community media arise, how they develop in particular ways and in particular places, and how they can enrich our understanding of the broader media landscape and its place in society. The 50 chapters present a range of theoretical and methodological positions, and arguments to demonstrate the dynamic, challenging and innovative thinking around the subject; locating media theory and practice within the broader concerns of democracy, citizenship, social exclusion, race, class and gender. In addition to research from the UK, the US, Canada, Europe and Australia, the Companion also includes studies from Colombia, Haiti, India, South Korea and Zimbabwe, enabling international comparisons to be made and also allowing for the problematisation of traditional - often Western - approaches to media studies. By considering media practices across a range of cultures and communities, this collection is an ideal companion to the key issues and debates within alternative and community media.
Journalism and Climate Crisis: Public Engagement, Media Alternatives recognizes that climate change is more than an environmental crisis. It is also a question of political and communicative capacity. This book enquires into which approaches to journalism, as a particularly important form of public communication, can best enable humanity to productively address climate crisis. The book combines selective overviews of previous research, normative enquiry (what should journalism be doing?) and original empirical case studies of environmental communication and media coverage in Australia and Canada. Bringing together perspectives from the fields of environmental communication and journalism studies, the authors argue for forms of journalism that can encourage public engagement and mobilization to challenge the powerful interests vested in a high-carbon economy – ‘facilitative’ and ‘radical’ roles particularly well-suited to alternative media and alternative journalism. Ultimately, the book argues for a fundamental rethinking of relationships between journalism, publics, democracy and climate crisis. This book will interest researchers, students and activists in environmental politics, social movements and the media.
The sudden meltdown of the news media has sparked one of the liveliest debates in recent memory, with an outpouring of opinion and analysis crackling across journals, the blogosphere, and academic publications. Yet, until now, we have lacked a comprehensive and accessible introduction to this new and shifting terrain. In Will the Last Reporter Please Turn out the Lights, celebrated media analysts Robert W. McChesney and Victor Pickard have assembled thirty-two illuminating pieces on the crisis in journalism, revised and updated for this volume. Featuring some of today’s most incisive and influential commentators, this comprehensive collection contextualizes the predicament faced by the news media industry through a concise history of modern journalism, a hard-hitting analysis of the structural and financial causes of news media’s sudden collapse, and deeply informed proposals for how the vital role of journalism might be rescued from impending disaster. Sure to become the essential guide to the journalism crisis, Will the Last Reporter Please Turn out the Lights is both a primer on the news media today and a chronicle of a key historical moment in the transformation of the press.
Bringing together new and classic work by Tony Harcup, this book considers the development of alternative journalism from the 1970s up until today. Bringing theory and practice together, Harcup builds an understanding of alternative media through the use of detailed case studies and surveys. Including opinions of journalists who have worked in both mainstream and alternative media, he considers the motivations, practices and roles of alternative journalism as well as delving into ethical considerations. Moving from the history of alternative journalism, Harcup considers the recent spread of 'citizen journalism' and the use of social media, and asks what the role of alternative journalism is today.
A Virtual Chinatown explores the reciprocal relationship between ethnic media and transnational communities by exmaining the adaptation of Chinese immigrants to New Zealand.
Alternative and Activist New Media provides a rich and accessible overview of the ways in which activists, artists, and citizen groups around the world use new media and information technologies to gain visibility and voice, present alternative or marginal views, share their own DIY information systems and content, and otherwise resist, talk back to, or confront dominant media culture. Today, a lively and contentious cycle of capture, cooptation, and subversion of information, content, and system design marks the relationship between the mainstream ‘center’ and the interactive, participatory ‘edges’ of media culture. Five principal forms of alternative and activist new media projects are introduced, including the characteristics that make them different from more conventional media forms and content. The book traces the historical roots of these projects in alternative media, social movements, and activist art, including analyses of key case studies and links to relevant electronic resources. Alternative and Activist New Media will be a useful addition to any course on new media and society, and essential for readers interested in new media activism.
A text that reveals the value and significance of community media in an era of global communication With contributions from an international team of well-known experts, media activists, and promising young scholars, this comprehensive volume examines community-based media from theoretical, empirical, and practical perspectives. More than 30 original essays provide an incisive and timely analysis of the relationships between media and society, technology and culture, and communication and community. Key Features Provides vivid examples of community and alternative media initiatives from around the world Explores a wide range of media institutions, forms, and practices—community radio, participatory video, street newspapers, Independent Media Centers, and community informatics Offers cutting-edge analysis of community and alternative media with original essays from new, emerging, and established voices in the field Takes a multidimensional approach to community media studies by highlighting the social, economic, cultural, and political significance of alternative, independent, and community-oriented media organizations Enters the ongoing debates regarding the theory and practice of community media in a comprehensive and engaging fashion Intended Audience This core text is designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses such as Community Media, Alternative Media, Media & Social Change, Communication & Culture, and Participatory Communication in the departments of communication, media studies, sociology, and cultural studies.
Big Media, Big Money is a lively and scathing critique of the contemporary communications industry, examining how media ownership and the profit-making motive affect the messages we receive in alarming ways. Through close readings of recent news events and critical examination of corporate influence, Bettig and Hall conclude that current interconnections among media, big business, government, and education pose a serious threat to democratic communications. The second edition includes three new chapters, covering the contemporary Hollywood film industry; the changing landscape of the music industry; and “ad creep,” the proliferation of advertising into previously ad-free venues such as schools and children’s television programming.
Offers a sweeping account of the class and racial conflicts in the American news media, from the first colonial newspaper to the Internet age. By the co-author of Harvest of Empire.
Originally published in hardcover in 2011.
Foundations of Community Journalism: A Primer for Research is the first and only book to focus on how to understand and conduct research in this ever increasing field. With chapters written by established journalism academics and teachers, the book provides students and researchers with an understanding of the multiple and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of community journalism, with what community journalism is as a research concept, and with a range of different methods and theories that can be applied to community journalism research. While there are numerous ′how-to′ community journalism manuals for students and newspaper editors, none contains the focus on how to conduct research into community journalism - a focus needed in this era of accountability.
In a thorough empirical investigation of journalistic practices in different news contexts, 'New Media, Old News' explores how technological, economic and social changes have reconfigured news journalism, and the consequences of these transformations for a vibrant democracy in our digital age.
The Routledge Companion to News and Journalism presents an authoritative, comprehensive assessment of diverse forms of news media reporting – past, present and future. Including 60 chapters, written by an outstanding team of internationally respected authors, the Companion provides scholars and students with a reliable, historically informed guide to news media and journalism studies. The Companion has the following features: It is organised to address a series of themes pertinent to the on-going theoretical and methodological development of news and journalism studies around the globe. The focus encompasses news institutions, production processes, texts, and audiences. Individual chapters are problem-led, seeking to address ‘real world’ concerns that cast light on an important dimension of news and journalism – and show why it matters. Entries draw on a range of academic disciplines to explore pertinent topics, particularly around the role of journalism in democracy, such as citizenship, power and public trust. Discussion revolves primarily around academic research conducted in the UK and the US, with further contributions from other national contexts - thereby allowing international comparisons to be made. The Routledge Companion to News and Journalism provides an essential guide to key ideas, issues, concepts and debates, while also stressing the value of reinvigorating scholarship with a critical eye to developments in the professional realm. The paperback edition of this Companion includes four new chapters, focusing on news framing, newsmagazines, digital radio news, and social media. Contributors: G. Stuart Adam, Stuart Allan, Chris Atton, Brian Baresch, Geoffrey Baym, W. Lance Bennett, Rodney Benson, S. Elizabeth Bird, R. Warwick Blood, Tanja Bosch, Raymond Boyle, Bonnie Brennen, Qing Cao, Cynthia Carter, Anabela Carvalho, Deborah Chambers, Lilie Chouliaraki, Lisbeth Clausen, James R. Compton, Simon Cottle, Ros Coward, Andrew Crisell, Mark Deuze, Roger Dickinson, Wolfgang Donsbach, Mats Ekström, James S.Ettema, Natalie Fenton, Bob Franklin, Herbert J. Gans, Mark Glaser, Mark Hampton, Joseph Harker, Jackie Harrison, John Hartley, Alfred Hermida, Andrew Hoskins, Shih-Hsien Hsu, Dale Jacquette, Bengt Johansson, Richard Kaplan, Carolyn Kitch, Douglas Kellner, Larsåke Larsson, Justin Lewis, Jake Lynch, Mirca Madianou, Donald Matheson, Heidi Mau, Brian McNair, Kaitlynn Mendes, Máire Messenger Davies, Toby Miller, Martin Montgomery, Marguerite Moritz, Mohammed el-Nawawy, Henrik Örnebring, Julian Petley, Shawn Powers, Greg Philo, Stephen D. Reese, Barry Richards, David Rowe, Philip Seib, Jane B. Singer, Guy Starkey, Linda Steiner, Daya Kishan Thassu, John Tulloch, Howard Tumber, Silvio Waisbord, Gary Whannel, Andrew Williams, Barbie Zelizer
"Untangles the jargon and sets out the route-map for how the social network can enable us to become major contributors to the multiplatform digital age. The right message, the right time - this is the right book for taking advantage of it all." - Jon Snow, Channel 4 News The essential guide to understanding and harnessing the tools of journalism today, Meagan Knight and Clare Cook show you how to master the enduring rules of good practice and the new techniques of social media. The book gives a thorough guide to principles and practice, including: How to find, write and break stories with social media An online journalism toolkit to get you started Using crowdsourcing to find and follow stories Getting on top of user-generated content The ins and outs of copyright and ethics Building your brand and making money The new economy of journalism and how to get ahead. More than a simple 'how-to' guide, this book takes you to the next level with its integration of theory and practice. It is a one-stop guide for students and practitioners of journalism.
What is the breaking news in the world today? How did you find out this news? How do you know it is true? Was it reported ethically? Are brakes being put on the news media?
Journalism in Crisis addresses the concerns of scholars, activists, and journalists committed to Canadian journalism as a democratic institution and as a set of democratic practices. The authors look within Canada and abroad for solutions for balancing the Canadian media ecology. Public policies have been central to the creation and shaping of Canada's media system and, rather than wait for new technologies or economic models, the contributors offer concrete recommendations for how public policies can foster journalism that can support democratic life in twenty-first century Canada. Their work, which includes new theoretical perspectives and valuable discussions of journalism practices in public, private, and community media, should be read by professional and citizen journalists, academics, media activists, policy makers and media audiences concerned about the future of democratic journalism in Canada.
A thorough introduction to the essential skills of working with the media for public relations students and professionals, updated to reflect the impact of technology on mainstream media and the growing influence of social media.
Expanding peace journalism: comparative and critical approaches draws together cutting-edge contributions from 17 international writers to this rapidly emerging field of research. Media coverage of conflicts is propagandistic and commonly portrays two elite actors contesting a single goal of 'victory'. This major new text explores and interrogates peace journalism as a significant challenge to this hegemonic discourse, which has been advocated and elaborated over the recent years in journalism, media development and academic spheres. Expanding peace journalism traces boundaries and links with the adjacent fields including alternative media, social movement activism and media democratisation. It includes case studies - from the media of countries including Australia, Canada, Guatemala, India, Nigeria, Norway, Sweden and the US - and explores connections with human rights, as well as Indigenous and women's rights activism. The problem some 50 years ago was what criteria an event had to meet to qualify as news ... When the news represents a distorted world image, the distortions are worth knowing. This book, so rich in content, is a testimony to the need for empirical, critical and constructive scrutiny of media. Each chapter opens a new window, a new angle; all of them important. From the preface by Johan Galtung

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