Set in the heart of the Sussex Downs, Charleston Farmhouse is the most important remaining example of Bloomsbury decorative style, created by the painters Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant. Quentin Bell, the younger son of Clive and Vanessa Bell, and his daughter Virghinia Nicholson, tell the story of this unique house, linking it with some of the leading cultural figures who were invited there, including Vanessa's sister Virginia Woolf, the writer Lytton Strachey, the economist Maynard Keynes and the art critic Roger Fry. The house and garden are portrayed through Alen MacWeeney's atmostpheric photographs; pictures from Vanessa Bell's family album convey the flavour of the household in its heyday.
The Bloomsbury circle has long preoccupied writers, critics, and the general public alike. For many years its focal point was Charleston Farmhouse in Sussex, home to Vanessa and Clive Bell and Duncan Grant. A Cézanne in the Hedge brings together thirty firsthand reminiscences of the Charleston, vividly and amusingly evoking its creativity—and eccentricity. Childhood memories from Quentin Bell, Angelica Garnett, and Nigel Nicholson are interspersed with appraisals of the work of Bloomsbury members such as Roger Fry, Maynard Keynes, and Virginia Woolf and of their contribution to twentieth-century British art and thought. The finale is a childhood spoof written by Virginia Woolf entitled "A Terrible Tragedy in a Duckpond."
Fascination with the Bloomsbury set - Virginia Woolf, Leonard Woolf, Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, Lytton Strachey. Dora Carrington among others, never ceases. Bloomsbury at Home is the story of the friendship between a group of witty, lively, like-minded, highly-talented individuals who came together during the first half of the twentieth century. The book is divided by biography and geography into chapters centering on specific people and places, for example, Garsington, the home of Lady Ottoline Morrell, and Hogarth House in Richmond, home to Viriginia and Leonard Woolf, and of course no book on the Bloomsbury set would be complete without mention of Vanessa Bell's home at Charleston. Illustrated with a wide range of colour and black and white photographs, memorabilia (everything from menus to postcards). portraits and paintings by members of the group. Pamela Todd assembles a detailed account of how and where the Bloomsbury group grew up, interacted and lived together during the first half of the twentieth century producing some of their finest work, as well as evoking the richness of that extraordinary period in English art and literature.
Set in the heart of the Sussex Downs, Charleston Farmhouse is the most important remaining example of Bloomsbury decorative style. But the garden, described by Virginia Woolf on her arrival in 1916 as "charming. . . now run rather wild" became and remained central to life in the farmhouse. The walled garden, created by Vanessa Bell and Roger Fry from the vegetable garden after the war, as well as the pond, the orchard, and the lawns which shade off into the fields, all contributed in a major sense to the creative energies of the place. And this creativity is reflected in the numerous works of art in stone, in wood, in brick, and in ceramic that Bell, Fry, Duncan Grant, and the next generation -- notably Quentin Bell -- contributed to the garden to enhance (and sometimes to comment on or to counterpoint) the simple but expressive planting schemes. Now, for the first time, the year-round charm and glory of this most English and most artistic of gardens has been captured by one of Britain's leading garden photographers.
They ate garlic and didn't always bathe; they listened to Wagner and worshiped Diaghilev; they sent their children to coeducational schools, explored homosexuality and free love, vegetarianism and Post-impressionism. They were often drunk and broke, sometimes hungry, but they were of a rebellious spirit. Inhabiting the same England with Philistines and Puritans, this parallel minority of moral pioneers lived in a world of faulty fireplaces, bounced checks, blocked drains, whooping cough, and incontinent cats. They were the bohemians. Virginia Nicholson -- the granddaughter of painter Vanessa Bell and the great-niece of Virginia Woolf -- explores the subversive, eccentric, and flamboyant artistic community of the early twentieth century in this "wonderfully researched and colorful composite portrait of an enigmatic world whose members, because they lived by no rules, are difficult to characterize" (San Francisco Chronicle).
In this enthralling portrait, Maggie Humm makes available for the first time a trove of barely known photographs, both amateur and professional, casting new light on the private lives of Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell as well as the historical, cultural, and artistic milieux of their circle in Bloomsbury and beyond. We visit the domestic lives of major nineteenth- and twentieth-century writers and artists, such as E. M. Forster, who is pictured happily engaged in the task of pruning trees with Leonard Woolf. We see T. S. Eliot and his wife, Vivienne, and Thoby Stephen "Kodaking" Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. There are intimate portraits of Vanessa Bell's children and erotic photos of Duncan Grant's lovers. Also included are many photographs of a happy and contented Virgina Woolf, which provide an often neglected balance to our sense of her as neurotic and eccentric. The parade of characters is long and full, including Cyril Connolly, Vita Sackville-West, Roger Fry, David Garnett, Lady Ottoline Morrell, Walter Sickert, Clive Bell, the Stracheys, Dora Carrington, John Maynard Keynes, and many more. The domestic photographs, taken predominantly with the enormously popular vest-pocket Kodak cameras of the time, are complemented by professional photographs by Man Ray and Gisèle Freund. Beyond illustrating the remarkable range of the Woolfs' and Bell's aesthetic vocabularies, the photographs pose an important challenge to language-centered critiques of modernism. Drawing on Foucault and gender, memory, and psychoanalytic theory, Humm shows how modernism is indebted, more than we realize, to the popular culture of photography. Meticulously researched and painstakingly organized, this unique book brings critical insight to the uncatalogued photographs from the Harvard Theatre collection and the photographs of the Tate archives. In doing so, Snapshots of Bloomsbury makes a major contribution to Woolf scholarship.
Presents a collection of stories written by Virginia Woolf for her nephews' satirical family newspaper in the 1920s and illustrated by her nephew Quentin, describing events in the lives of family members, servants, and visitors.
Few groups of artists and writers have been the object of as much study as the Bloomsbury group. This book, originally published in 1976, was the first to look at the contribution of the painters of the group, Vanessa Bell (1879-1961) and Duncan Grant (1885-1978), not only within the context of Bloomsbury but also from the wider perspective of modern British art. In a vivid narrative, Richard Shone weaves together the artists' private lives and professional careers during the first decades of this century. He illuminates their friendships within Bloomsbury, notably with the critic and painter Roger Fry, with Virginia Woolf, Lytton Strachey, Maynard Keynes and Lady Ottoline Morrell, and in the world of painting with figures such as Picasso, Derain and Sickert. Chapters are devoted to the artists' early careers, to the advent of the Omega Workshops, the artists' discovery of Charleston (their home in Sussex) and their work as decorative designers between the two World Wars.Bloomsbury Portraits, which received wide acclaim on first publication, has long been out of print. This edition has been revised throughout, and incorporates new information and over 80 colour illustrations. Much of the vividness of the book and its authentic evocation of the Bloomsbury artists' lives and times comes from Shone's first-hand experience of Charleston and his friendship with Duncan Grant in the last years of the painter's life.
"Contemporary photographs, paintings and surviving interiors, notably at Grant and Bell's Sussex farmhouse, Charleston, illustrate the remarkable creativity of the Bloomsbury domestic aesthetic."--BOOK JACKET.
Built in the seventeenth century, the Sussex farmhouse Charleston was home from 1916 until 1978 to two of the most influential artists of Bloomsbury group--Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant. And during their residence, Bell and Grant opened the doors of Charleston as a country retreat for many members of the group, including Bell's sister Virginia Woolf and her husband Leonard, the economist John Maynard Keynes, the art critics Roger Fry and Clive Bell, and the biographer Lytton Strachey. Charleston is a house unlike any other, with many a story to tell. After Duncan Grant died in 1978, Charleston's fate remained unclear for several years with its contents remaining undisturbed and unaltered from their Bloomsbury days. During this time, while funds were being sought for the house's restoration, Kim Marsland made two visits to take notes and photographs. Her unique record of Charleston, gathered here in this marvelous book, shows the house just as Grant left it--cluttered with years of painting, collecting, and literary life. The previously unpublished photographs gathered here showcase the unique atmosphere of a house full of memories and artistic importance. They also show Charleston before its restoration, allowing the reader a peek into a lost past. Fully restored, the farmhouse is now a hugely popular destination for visitors and hosts an annual literary festival. Charleston Farmhouse offers a beautiful and rare glimpse into the real world of the Bloomsbury group.
Monkâ??s House in Sussex is the former home of Leonard and Virginia Woolf. It was bought by them in 1919 as a country retreat, somewhere they came to read, write and work in the garden. From the overgrown land behind the house they created a brilliant patchwork of garden rooms, linked by brick paths, secluded behind flint walls and yew hedges. The story of this magical garden is the subject of this book and the author has selected quotations from the writings of the Woolfs which reveal how important a role the garden played in their lives, as a source of both pleasure and inspiration. Virginia wrote most of her major novels at Monkâ??s House, at first in a converted tool shed, and later in her purpose-built wooden writing lodge tucked into a corner of the orchard. Caroline Zoob lived with her husband, Jonathan, at Monkâ??s House for over a decade as tenants of the National Trust, and has an intimate knowledge of the garden they tended and planted. The photographer, Caroline Arber, was a frequent visitor to the house during their tenancy and her spectacular photographs, published here for the first time, often reveal the garden as it is never seen by the public: at dawn, in the depths of winter, at dusk. The photographs and text, enriched with rare archive images and embroidered garden plans, take the reader on a journey through the various garden â??roomsâ??, (including the Italian Garden, the Fishpond Garden, the Millstone Terrace and the Walled Garden). Each garden room is presented in the context of the lives of the Woolfs, with fascinating glimpses into their daily routines at Rodmell. This beautiful book is an absorbing account of the creation of a garden which will appeal equally to gardeners and those with an interest in Virginia and Leonard Woolf.
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The daughter of eminent Victorian writer Sir Leslie Stephen and older sister of Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell was a well-known avant-garde painter and decorator, and a central figure in the Bloomsbury group. The collection, including many of Vanessa daily letters to her children, sister, and her lovers, takes readers from 1885 to 1961 - through more than seventy years and two world wars. Together they document Vanessa's fascinating and often romantic relationship with her sister; her domestic and aesthetic life at various houses including Gordon Square, Asheham, Cassis and Charleston; and her passionate involvements with Rodger Fry and Duncan Grant - who himself would have had an affair with the writer David Bunny Garnett, future husband of Duncan and Vanessa daughter, Angelica.
This compelling new study reveals, for the first time, through an emplaced investigation, the potential of Charleston and Monk's House to illuminate the shared histories of Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell.
Features the Victorian-Era recipes of the members of a London artistic collective that included Virginia Woolf, John Maynard Keynes and E.M. Forster, who hosted long breakfasts and “painting lunches” to debate the state of the world and their place in it. 11,000 first printing.
This book brings together a comprehensive selection of Roger Fry's essays, from modern French art, to formalist aesthetic theory. The book examines the foundations of modern art criticism, the nature of art and the aesthetic experience.
This catalogue accompanies an exhibition organized by the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art at Cornell University, and curated by Nancy E. Green.
Angelica Garnett may truly be called a child of Bloomsbury. Her Aunt was Virginia Woolf, her mother Vanessa Bell, and her father Duncan Grant, though for many years Angelica believed herself, naturally enough, the daughter of Vanessa's husband Clive. Her childhood homes, Charleston in Sussex and Gordon Square in London, were both centres of Bloomsbury activity, and she grew up surrounded by the most talked-about writers and artists of the day - Leonard and Virginia Woolf, Roger Fry, the Stracheys, Maynard Keynes, David Garnett (whom she later married), and many others. But Deceived with Kindness is also a record of a young girl's particular struggle to achieve independence from that extraordinary and intense milieu as a mature and independent woman. With an honesty that is by degrees agonising and uplifting, the author creates a vibrant, poignant picture of her mother, Vanessa Bell, of her own emergent individuality, and of the Bloomsbury era.
The lives of the sisters Vanessa Bell and Virginia Woolf have long been celebrated for their central roles in the development of modernism in art and literature. Inspired by European Post-Impressionism, Vanessa's experimental work places her at the vanguard of early twentieth-century art, as does her role in helping introduce many key names - Cézanne, Matisse, Picasso - to an unsuspecting public in 1910. Virginia took these artistic innovations and applied them to literature, pushing the boundaries of form, narrative and language to find a voice uniquely her own. Yet their private lives were just as experimental. Forming the core of the Bloomsbury Group, they welcomed into their London and Sussex homes a host of their talented peers and followed their hearts in the pursuit of love. Vanessa's marriage to art critic Clive Bell was shaken early on by his flirtation with her sister, but this allowed her to find happiness with fellow artist Roger Fry. It was the predominantly homosexual Duncan Grant, though, who would become her lifelong partner, as they shared and decorated their home, Charleston, making it a living showpiece for their art. Virginia's marriage to Leonard Woolf placed him more in the role of carer than husband, with the pair abstaining from sex and living under a regime designed to meet the needs of Virginia's fragile mental health. Her meeting with the aristocratic Vita Sackville-West and their lesbian affair led Virginia to write one of the masterpieces of modern literature. What led the sisters to make such choices? How did they reconcile life and art? How did it feel, in early modern Britain, to live outside the social box? The sisters lived bravely, passionately and innovatively; where did this strength and talent come from?
The life of the painter and designer Duncan Grant spanned great changes in society and art, from Edwardian Britain to the 1970s, from Alma-Tadema to Gilbert and George. This authoritive biography combines an engrossing narrative with an invaluable assessment of Grant's individual achievement and his place within Bloomsbury and in the wider development of British art. 'Spalding's skill is to sketch out the intricate emotional web against the bright bold untouchable figure of the artist. . . Her achievement is to let that sense of a man living with his craft shine through on every page: the result is an exceptionally honest and warm portrait. ' Financial Times

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