"A history of the development of Chicago as a railroad hub, from its earliest days to the present, illustrated with color and black and white photographs, maps, and railroad memorabilia"-Provided by publisher.
No other American city had such a fascinating group of railroad passenger stations as Chicago. This book highlights Chicago's six major railroad stations and the trains that served them. Included are Dearborn Station, Grand Central Station, Central Station, La Salle Street Station, North Western Station, and Union Station. During the heyday of passenger trains, Chicago was the undisputed rail center of the United States and its railroad stations were the gates to everywhere. Chicago's railroad stations featured superb architecture with marble floors and staircases, while restaurants, newsstands and shops filled the concourse areas. Steel latticework beams helped support glass-domed roofs and public address systems echoed train information throughout the high-ceiling stations. Huge station clocks loomed above the brass and neon train bulletin boards that listed "On Time" trains. Beyond the boarding gates, the constant parade of trains sounded with clanging bells and rumbling steel wheels. Historic photographs feature name trains like Super Chief, Capitol Limited, 20th Century Limited, Broadway Limited, California Zephyr, Hiawatha, 400, and City of Denver. Included are maps, station drawings, timetables and promotional advertising.
This richly illustrated volume tells the story of a legendary railroad whose tracks spanned the Midwest, serving farms and small-town America for more than 140 years. One of the earliest railroads to build westward from Chicago, it was the first to span the Mississippi, advancing the frontier, bringing settlers into the West, and hauling their crops to market. Rock Island’s celebrated Rocket passenger trains also set a standard for speed and service, with suburban runs as familiar to Windy City commuters as the Loop. For most of its existence, the Rock battled competitors much larger and richer than itself and when it finally succumbed, the result was one of the largest business bankruptcies ever. Today, as its engines and stock travel the busy main lines operated by other carriers, the Rock Island Line lives on in the hearts of those whom it employed and served.
In 1948, Chicago was the gathering place of 22 railroads, seven belt and switching roads, eight industrial railroads and three electric lines. Track was everywhere as passenger trains and commuter trains crowded the approaches to the terminals near the Loop that is Chicago, undisputed railroad capital of the world. Chicago Passenger Trains & Commuter Trains captures the spirit and challenges of the post-World War II era, as streamlined passenger trains arrived and departed from Chicago’s six celebrated stations during the pinnacle years of intercity train service. Welcome aboard as we ride those grand trains of the 1950s and 1960s into their twilight years and transition into Amtrak’s “Rainbow era.” Vintage and color photography, terminal and commuter maps, train brochures, postcards and tickets are featured. Nice color and vintage scenes for modelers.
Take an historical tour of Chicago's railroad stations, airports, bus depots and steamship wharves. Showcasing great icons of transportation, Schwieterman illustrates why the "Windy City" so richly deserves its reputation as America's premier travel hub.
Commuter, or Suburban Rail Passenger Train Services have been an important part of the Chicago Metro area for well over 100 years. Since the city and its suburbs are economically interdependent upon one another, passenger service could not be discontinued without severe economic impacts on the entire Chicago area. The Metra Commuter Rail Service and the Indiana Commuter Transportation District (South Shore) services have realized this and are providing a crucial life line for the many Chicago-Suburban corridors, and have made substantial gains and many expansions since the 1980s. This book reviews the commuter services offered in the Chicago area on the Chicago & North Western, The Milwaukee Road, the South Shore, the Illinois Central, the Rock Island, the Burlington, the Wabash, the Gulf, Mobile and Ohio, the South Shore, the New York Central and the Pennsylvania Railroads before the development of the RTA, Metra and NICTD.
In 1836, Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas agreed on one thing: Illinois needed railroads. Over the next fifty years, the state became the nation s railroad hub, with Chicago at its center. Speculators, greed, growth, and regulation followed as the railroad industry consumed unprecedented amounts of capital and labor. A nationwide market resulted, and the Windy City became the site of opportunities and challenges that remain to this day. In this first-of-its-kind history, full of entertaining anecdotes and colorful characters, Simon Cordery describes the explosive growth of Illinois railroads and its impact on America. Cordery shows how railroading in Illinois influenced railroad financing, the creation of a national economy, and government regulation of business. Cordery's masterful chronicle of rail development in Illinois from 1837 to 2010 reveals how the state s expanding railroads became the foundation of the nation s rail network."
Offers a history of the world famous Chicago "L," the elevated railroad that has operated since 1892 and has been ridden by more than ten billion people.
From the railway's beginnings, the station building, itself, had civic importance greater than ordinary structures. Let historian Brian Solomon show you how beautifully it filled that role. Railway Depots, Stations & Terminals is a unique book about some of the finest, most interesting, and most famous railway stations. Contemporary photographs, historic images, and postcard views provide an in-depth look at the architectural gems that dot the railroad landscape. The railway station has a special role in people's lives. Stations have served as the gateway to the world's great cities and the point of contact for remote towns. The inherent nature of the station is different from that of other buildings; it is an entrance, an exit, a place to rest, and a stop along the way. It can be the first thing a traveler sees and the last memory of a favorite city. Facing both the street and the tracks, the station is naturally a point of departure and a face of the city it serves. Brian Solomon, one of today's most accomplished railway historians, leads you through a one-of-a-kind exploration of the history and architecture of depots, stations, and terminals.
More than a century before the age of airlines, the windy city of Chicago was already the nation's transportation hub. Tightly linked to its railroads, Chicago Union Station provided a way for passengers to reach cities from the Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf coasts. In this stunning book, railroad historian Fred Ash tells the story of Chicago Union Station from its beginning in the mid-1800s, when Chicago dominated Midwest trade and was referred to as the "Railroad Capital of the World." From the swing in the political climate that significantly modified the relationship between the local government and its largest landholders, to the competition between railroad companies at the turn of the 20th century, the station continued to be a center for prosperity. Profiling the fascinating stories of businessmen, politicians, workers, and immigrants whose everyday lives were affected by the bustling transportation hub, Ash documents the impact Union Station had on the growing city and the entire Midwest. Featuring more than 100 photographs of the famous beaux art architecture, Chicago Union Station is a beautifully illustrated tribute to one of America's overlooked treasures.
Explore the history, quirks, and stories behind signals with gorgeous period and contemporary photography. Railroad signals are the link between the steam era and modern railroading. Designed for reliability and durability, signals can survive for decades. In fact, old semaphores installed during the early years of the twentieth century were still in service during the 1990s, protecting trains that were running with the latest modern diesels. Even searchlight-style signals that were the epitome of 1940s railroading continue to work today. Though standards were introduced in the early twentieth century, interpretation varied greatly among railroads, so even major railroads have individualized signals. Some, such as the Pennsylvania Railroad, were noted for their distinctive signaling hardware. Others lines became known for their peculiarities in practice. Classic Railroad Signals examines how different railroads developed specific hardware to serve their unique needs, in the process tracing the lineage of various types of hardware and highlighting how and where they were used. From nineteenth-century mechanical signals to disc signals, upper- and lower-quadrant semaphores, three-light electric signals, searchlight-style targets, positional lights, and color-position light hardware, author Brian Solomon covers nearly every conceivable piece of North American signaling hardware, even the virtually extinct wig wag that was once standard in California and Wisconsin. Gorgeous period and contemporary photography shows signals and trains from around North America. Classic Railroad Signals should be next to Railroad Signaling on every railroad fan's bookshelf.
Get detailed information on diesel locomotives produced in North America from the 1930s to today.
This hugely influential work marked a turning point in US history and culture, arguing that the nation’s expansion into the Great West was directly linked to its unique spirit: a rugged individualism forged at the juncture between civilization and wilderness, which – for better or worse – lies at the heart of American identity today. Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves – and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives – and destroyed them. Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization and helped make us who we are.
In this new 264-page book, 68 pages of which are in full color, author John Kelly explores the fascinating history of the city's railroads, starting with the Milwaukee & Waukesha in 1847. By 1873 the Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway--later the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific ("The Milwaukee Road") opened a line to Chicago and the railroad was on its way. The Milwaukee Shops and the Hiawatha legend, Skytops and Super Domes, and the story behind designer Brooks Stevens, are also featured. Kelly supplies copious data on not only the Milwaukee Road, but also the Chicago & NorthWestern's freight and passenger service, including the 400 fleet. Kelly also writes about the Chicago North Shore and Milwaukee Railroad, America's Fastest Interurban, the Skokie Valley Route and Electroliners. In the Milwaukee Electric Railway & Light Company section, he reviews streetcars, interurbans and trackless trolley buses. With the inclusion of the Lake Boats, the Pere Marquette, Chesapeake & Ohio, and Grand Trunk Western RR's also come into the picture. In addition the book covers the Beer Line and the breweries, Milwaukee's meatpacking industry, Milwaukee's railroad stations and freight yards--a recipe for some great railroad reading. Generously illustrated with 135 color and 362 black and white photos, maps and drawings, this limited edition volume will be available in hardcover and is a treasured keepsake for your library.
This elegant volume celebrates the 75th anniversary of Trains Magazine, the premier publication in its field.
From the "preeminent historian of Reconstruction" (New York Times Book Review), a newly updated AND abridged edition of the prizewinning classic on the post–Civil War period that shaped modern America In this updated edition of the abridged Reconstruction, Eric Foner redefines how the post-Civil War period was viewed. Reconstruction chronicles the way in which Americans—black and white—responded to the unprecedented changes unleashed by the war and the end of slavery. It addresses the quest of emancipated slaves searching for economic autonomy and equal citizenship, and describes the remodeling of Southern society, the evolution of racial attitudes and patterns of race relations, and the emergence of a national state possessing vastly expanded authority and committed, for a time, to the principle of equal rights for all Americans. This "masterful treatment of one of the most complex periods of American history" (New Republic) remains the standard work on the wrenching post-Civil War period—an era whose legacy still reverberates in the United States today.
NATIONAL BESTSELLER WINNER OF THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD In this groundbreaking biography, T.J. Stiles tells the dramatic story of Cornelius “Commodore” Vanderbilt, the combative man and American icon who, through his genius and force of will, did more than perhaps any other individual to create modern capitalism. Meticulously researched and elegantly written, The First Tycoon describes an improbable life, from Vanderbilt’s humble birth during the presidency of George Washington to his death as one of the richest men in American history. In between we see how the Commodore helped to launch the transportation revolution, propel the Gold Rush, reshape Manhattan, and invent the modern corporation. Epic in its scope and success, the life of Vanderbilt is also the story of the rise of America itself. From the Trade Paperback edition.

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