The popular notion of how children come to speak their first language is that their parents teach them words, then phrases, then sentences, then longer utterances. Although there is widespread agreement amongst linguists that this account is wrong, there is much less agreement as to how children really learn language. This revised edition of Ray Cattell's bestselling textbook aims to give readers the background necessary to form their own views on the debate, and includes accessible summaries of key thinkers, including Chomsky, Halliday, Karmiloff-Smith and Piaget.
First published in 1983. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
An understanding of the way in which children's language and literacy develop is essential when working in an early years setting. This concise and accessible text outlines all the key issues in the area and explains the nature of language, the theories and sequence of language development and the development of reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The book also includes chapters on bilingualism, communication problems and working with the child who is deaf. Written by authors with many years' teaching in the field, this book will be valuable to all students of early years, health and social care, psychology, nursing and speech therapy courses and practitioners in these fields.
The authors emphasize the fundamental principles and enduring themes underlying children's development and focus on key research. This new edition also contains a new chapter on gender, as well as recent work on conceptual development.
Learning to talk is probably the greatest milestone in a child's development: a deeply moving and often hilarious experience for all parents. In this charming and informative book, Britain's leading expert on the English language talks you through every stage in your child's language development. Over thirty years after its original publication, this new and updated edition of Listen to your Child shows us that while the world our children are growing up in may have changed, one thing has not: parents still need to listen. Gathering decades of research from psychologists and linguists, Professor Crystal shows how the more we know about language acquisition - from 'cooking' and 'babbling' to melodic 'scribble talk' and simple words and then to incessant chatter - the more there is to delight in. From birth to the early school years, Listen to your Child provides a painless introduction to the study of child language acquisition as well as invaluable advice for parents.
All over the world children learn one (or more) language at home and then have to learn another language when they go to school. In some cases this is because children come from immigrant backgrounds; in other cases children come from indigenous communiti
These volumes present coherent sets of papers developed along two of the thematic lines that underscored the program of the meeting of the International Association for the Study of Child Language in Istanbul in the summer of 1996. Thoroughly reviewed and updated to reflect the state of child language research and theory--particularly in the domains of discourse and interaction--they convey not only the flavor of that meeting but some of the most exciting trends in the field today. Each contribution in Volume 10, Developing Narrative and Discourse Competence, focuses on the differential effects of discourse genres, elicitation techniques, communicative contexts, literacy and schooling, and the oft-cited variables of age, language, and culture. Issues concerning the interrelations between social, cognitive, and affective capacities and processes in discourse are addressed. Each chapter raises theoretical questions regarding how and when representations are constructed to support new complexities. Presenting data from a cross-cultural and cross-linguistic perspective, this volume highlights both the particulars and the universals of the processes involved. The chapters in Volume 11, Interactional Contributions to Language Development, address issues including scaffolding of processing and learning in particular interactional sequences; linkages among interpersonal functions or relations, cognitive development, and semantic, syntactic, and pragmatic devices or forms; and models of how interactions proceed, input is selected, and learning advances across multiple rounds of interaction. Each of these volumes will be a valuable addition to the libraries of all who study the development of language.
This volume brings together the work of 32 scholars from 13 countries -- investigations of children learning 15 different languages, in some instances more than one at a time. The scope of this work -- as broad as it is -- only partially represents the research interests and approaches of the more than 350 scholars from 34 countries who contributed papers or posters to the Sixth International Congress for the Study of Child Language. This investigative power and diversity are, for the most part, focused on topics and issues of modern day child language research that have been under discussion for the last 30 years or so. Some even go beyond that in early diary studies and philosophers' speculations. While the issues are mainly familiar ones, the 17 chapters contribute to the advancement of child language study in several specific ways. They: * represent current theoretical frameworks, both bringing the insights of the theories to the interpretation of language development and testing tenets or implications of the theories with child language data; * contribute substantively to the crosslinguistic study of child language, reflecting both the linguistic diversity of the authors themselves and a recent major shift in the approach to child language study; * build on the now considerable body of knowledge about children's language, both adding to information about the basic systems of phonology, syntax, and semantics, and extending beyond to explore aspects of narrative and literacy development, language acquisition by bilingual and atypical children, and language processing; and * contain hints of new directions in child language study, such as increased attention to the impact of phonology on other language systems. Taken as a whole, this volume reflects the current strength of crosslinguistic research, the application and testing of new theoretical developments, a new legitimacy of language disorder data, and a new appeal to the descriptive possibilities of language processing models. In addition, there is a theme that runs through many of the chapters and points the way for important research in the future: the role of prosody in the acquisition of various language structures and systems.
Italian nouns are keyed to lively pictures of familiar everyday situations and scences.
Children's language difficulties affect many areas of functioning and development. Since most children with these difficulties are expected to function in ordinary schools and nurseries it is important that parents, teachers and practitioners have a broad understanding of the issues. Language and communication problems typically fall under the umbrella terms 'language disability, 'language delay', or 'language difficulties. They can range from an occasional difficulty with certain sounds to an inability to communicate using spoken language. These problems can occur in isolation or be associated with a range of special needs such as hearing loss, visual impairment or learning disabilities. This is the first introductory text to outline the difficulties experienced by children and link these to issues surrounding multidisciplinary assessment, intervention and service provision. Children's Language and Communication Difficulties offers professionals and parents an up-to-date account of: -the developmental language problems that children experience -the provision available to meet the child's needs the long term impact of language difficulties The authors examine the problems of identification and diagnosis, and explore the range of physical and cognitive disabilities associated with language problems. They have also looked closely at alternative forms of communication and have provided the reader with discussion and evaluation of recently developed intervention techniques.
The more teachers understand about how children learn to talk, the more they can help children become avid, joyful readers and writers. Drawing on a large body of research and her own volunteer work at a family shelter, Lindfors concisely identifies several important commonalities across oral and written language. Taking the compelling perspective that it's all language, she traces children's emergent literacy from infancy through the early school years. The book incorporates abundant examples from a diverse range of children engaged in authentic literacy experiences. Lindfors describes a set of language principles that teachers can build on as they help young students learn to read and write using the oral language processes they already know. The book contains a new, more positive "language acquisition perspective" on children's linguistic and literary capacities, fascinating and insightfully framed quotes, writings, and drawings from children, a 24-page Guide for Instructors and Teacher Study Groups, available for download at www.teacherscollegepress.com, and an Appendix containing an interview with shelter staff from SafePlace and offering basic information on how to identify children who are living in situations of violence and what teachers can do about it
Effective Theory and Applications in a Unique Collaborative Effort! Experts from two child-related disciplines have integrated their most effective theories and practices to provide an enhanced approach to developing language skills among young children. In this unique collaboration, child developmental specialists and speech pathologists clearly explain the function and value of language and provide readers with an important overview of language development in the first six years of life. The notable contributions in Facilitating Children's Language address many pertinent topics, including the theoretical background for understanding the acquisition of language, the components of a program that facilitate language development, a broad range of developmental activities that promote language growth, techniques that can be applied to determine the cause of delayed language, and case illustrations that exemplify how delayed language can be remediated in a child care setting. For those cases that cannot be remediated in this setting, guidelines for the referral process are included. Professionals responsible for promoting children's development in early childhood centers--including Head Start, day care, and nursery schools--will use this practical new handbook as a basic reference for daily activities and overall program planning.
This book contains case studies relating the experience of bilingual children in various settings in New Zealand primary schools. The contexts include a Maori bilingual school, a Samoan bilingual unit, and mainstream classrooms which cater for immigrant and deaf children. Suggestions for educational policy, teacher development and research are made.
How do infants and young children coordinate information in real time to arrive at sentence meaning from the words and structure of the sentence and from the nonlinguistic context? This volume introduces readers to an emerging field of research, experimental developmental psycholinguistics, and to the four predominant methodologies used to study on-line language processing in children. Authored by key figures in psycholinguistics, neuroscience and developmental psychology, the chapters cover event-related brain potentials, free-viewing eyetracking, looking-while-listening, and reaction-time techniques, also providing a historical backdrop for this line of research. Multiple aspects of experimental design, data collection and data analysis are addressed in detail, alongside surveys of recent important findings about how infants and children process sounds, words, and sentences. Indispensable for students and researchers working in the areas of language acquisition, developmental psychology and developmental neuroscience of language, this volume will also appeal to speech language pathologists and early childhood educators.
This volume presents current research findings on vital issues in language development compiled by an international group of leading researchers. The data are drawn from studies of the acquisition of Swedish, Polish, Serbo-Croatian, Hungarian, Portuguese, Italian, and English. Themes emphasized in all the chapters include the importance of the social context of acquisition, the existence of interconnections among various domains of language development, and the impossibility of understanding acquisition using a simple theory or a single methodological approach.
`In its third edition...the author has included the latest research evidence relating to children aged from nought to eight. Her writing embraces the value of play, relationships, bilingualism and multilingualism in creating a rich language and literacy environment. Developing Language and Literacy with Young Children will appeal to a wide range of readers - practitioners, students, and their tutors, as well as parents and carers' - Early Years Update 'Highly readable... Anybody working with babies and young children needs to have the knowledge that Whitehead clearly explains here' - SureStart 'One of the many excellent features of this book is the way it tackles the issue of bilingualism in early childhood' - Early Years Educator (eye) Praise for previous editions: `Marian Whitehead forces the reader to attend to the "voice of the child against the encroachment of inappropriate curriculum demands. Her total fascination for children's language development captures the reader in an enthusiastic and informed voyage through "the most exciting and important aspect of human development - language in the early years' - Early Years `This is an excellent read for all parents and workers with young children. The style of the book is friendly and accessible, with beautifully produced of photographs of children and indeed of their own work. Marian Whitehead is not ashamed to draw on her experiences as a grandparent, as well as highly competent theoretical researcher; she does both with competence and humour. This will prove an excellent source book for those involved in course design from childminders to university lecturers' - Child Language Teaching and Therapy Looking at the most exciting and important aspect of human development - communication and language in the early years - this accessible book gives carers, parents, teachers and other professionals who work and play with young children a confident understanding of children's communication and language development in the years from birth to age eight. The book examines the wide range of elements that are typical of all our communication and language activities: thinking, feeling, imagining, talking, listening, drawing, writing and reading. The author emphasizes the importance of children's relationships and communications with the people who care about them, spend time with them and share in the excitement of their developing languages and their investigations of literacy. Taking a holistic approach, she covers: o early communication and language o the achievements of young bilinguals o the significance of stories, narrative and language play o the emergence of literacy in homes, early years settings and classrooms. 'This highly readable guide discusses how to help babies become competent communicators...Anybody working with babies and young children needs to have the knowledge that Whitehead clearly explains here' - SureStart

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