The popular notion of how children come to speak their first language is that their parents teach them words, then phrases, then sentences, then longer utterances. Although there is widespread agreement amongst linguists that this account is wrong, there is much less agreement as to how children really learn language. This revised edition of Ray Cattell's bestselling textbook aims to give readers the background necessary to form their own views on the debate, and includes accessible summaries of key thinkers, including Chomsky, Halliday, Karmiloff-Smith and Piaget.
First published in 1985. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
This volume brings together the work of 32 scholars from 13 countries -- investigations of children learning 15 different languages, in some instances more than one at a time. The scope of this work -- as broad as it is -- only partially represents the research interests and approaches of the more than 350 scholars from 34 countries who contributed papers or posters to the Sixth International Congress for the Study of Child Language. This investigative power and diversity are, for the most part, focused on topics and issues of modern day child language research that have been under discussion for the last 30 years or so. Some even go beyond that in early diary studies and philosophers' speculations. While the issues are mainly familiar ones, the 17 chapters contribute to the advancement of child language study in several specific ways. They: * represent current theoretical frameworks, both bringing the insights of the theories to the interpretation of language development and testing tenets or implications of the theories with child language data; * contribute substantively to the crosslinguistic study of child language, reflecting both the linguistic diversity of the authors themselves and a recent major shift in the approach to child language study; * build on the now considerable body of knowledge about children's language, both adding to information about the basic systems of phonology, syntax, and semantics, and extending beyond to explore aspects of narrative and literacy development, language acquisition by bilingual and atypical children, and language processing; and * contain hints of new directions in child language study, such as increased attention to the impact of phonology on other language systems. Taken as a whole, this volume reflects the current strength of crosslinguistic research, the application and testing of new theoretical developments, a new legitimacy of language disorder data, and a new appeal to the descriptive possibilities of language processing models. In addition, there is a theme that runs through many of the chapters and points the way for important research in the future: the role of prosody in the acquisition of various language structures and systems.
An understanding of the way in which children's language and literacy develop is essential when working in an early years setting. This concise and accessible text outlines all the key issues in the area and explains the nature of language, the theories and sequence of language development and the development of reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The book also includes chapters on bilingualism, communication problems and working with the child who is deaf. Written by authors with many years' teaching in the field, this book will be valuable to all students of early years, health and social care, psychology, nursing and speech therapy courses and practitioners in these fields.
All over the world children learn one (or more) language at home and then have to learn another language when they go to school. In some cases this is because children come from immigrant backgrounds; in other cases children come from indigenous communiti
Effective Theory and Applications in a Unique Collaborative Effort! Experts from two child-related disciplines have integrated their most effective theories and practices to provide an enhanced approach to developing language skills among young children. In this unique collaboration, child developmental specialists and speech pathologists clearly explain the function and value of language and provide readers with an important overview of language development in the first six years of life. The notable contributions in Facilitating Children's Language address many pertinent topics, including the theoretical background for understanding the acquisition of language, the components of a program that facilitate language development, a broad range of developmental activities that promote language growth, techniques that can be applied to determine the cause of delayed language, and case illustrations that exemplify how delayed language can be remediated in a child care setting. For those cases that cannot be remediated in this setting, guidelines for the referral process are included. Professionals responsible for promoting children's development in early childhood centers--including Head Start, day care, and nursery schools--will use this practical new handbook as a basic reference for daily activities and overall program planning.
Children's language difficulties affect many areas of functioning and development. Since most children with these difficulties are expected to function in ordinary schools and nurseries it is important that parents, teachers and practitioners have a broad understanding of the issues. Language and communication problems typically fall under the umbrella terms 'language disability, 'language delay', or 'language difficulties. They can range from an occasional difficulty with certain sounds to an inability to communicate using spoken language. These problems can occur in isolation or be associated with a range of special needs such as hearing loss, visual impairment or learning disabilities. This is the first introductory text to outline the difficulties experienced by children and link these to issues surrounding multidisciplinary assessment, intervention and service provision. Children's Language and Communication Difficulties offers professionals and parents an up-to-date account of: -the developmental language problems that children experience -the provision available to meet the child's needs the long term impact of language difficulties The authors examine the problems of identification and diagnosis, and explore the range of physical and cognitive disabilities associated with language problems. They have also looked closely at alternative forms of communication and have provided the reader with discussion and evaluation of recently developed intervention techniques.
Introduction to the study of children's language difficulties, drawing widely on real-life examples.
These volumes present coherent sets of papers developed along two of the thematic lines that underscored the program of the meeting of the International Association for the Study of Child Language in Istanbul in the summer of 1996. Thoroughly reviewed and updated to reflect the state of child language research and theory--particularly in the domains of discourse and interaction--they convey not only the flavor of that meeting but some of the most exciting trends in the field today. Each contribution in Volume 10, Developing Narrative and Discourse Competence, focuses on the differential effects of discourse genres, elicitation techniques, communicative contexts, literacy and schooling, and the oft-cited variables of age, language, and culture. Issues concerning the interrelations between social, cognitive, and affective capacities and processes in discourse are addressed. Each chapter raises theoretical questions regarding how and when representations are constructed to support new complexities. Presenting data from a cross-cultural and cross-linguistic perspective, this volume highlights both the particulars and the universals of the processes involved. The chapters in Volume 11, Interactional Contributions to Language Development, address issues including scaffolding of processing and learning in particular interactional sequences; linkages among interpersonal functions or relations, cognitive development, and semantic, syntactic, and pragmatic devices or forms; and models of how interactions proceed, input is selected, and learning advances across multiple rounds of interaction. Each of these volumes will be a valuable addition to the libraries of all who study the development of language.
Approximately five percent of all children are born with the disorder known asspecific language impairment (SLI). These children show a significant deficit in spoken languageability with no obvious accompanying condition such as mental retardation, neurological damage, orhearing impairment. Children with Specific Language Impairment covers all aspectsof SLI, including its history, possible genetic and neurobiological origins, and clinical andeducational practice. The book highlights important research strategies in the quest to find thecause of SLI and to develop methods of prevention and treatment. It also explores how knowledge ofSLI may add to our understanding of language organization and development ingeneral. Leonard does not limit his study to English, but shows how SLI ismanifested in speakers of other languages. Although his focus is on children, he also discussesadults who exhibited SLI as children, as well as parents of children with the disorder whose ownlanguage abilities became the object of study.
This volume presents current research findings on vital issues in language development compiled by an international group of leading researchers. The data are drawn from studies of the acquisition of Swedish, Polish, Serbo-Croatian, Hungarian, Portuguese, Italian, and English. Themes emphasized in all the chapters include the importance of the social context of acquisition, the existence of interconnections among various domains of language development, and the impossibility of understanding acquisition using a simple theory or a single methodological approach.
This book contains case studies relating the experience of bilingual children in various settings in New Zealand primary schools. The contexts include a Maori bilingual school, a Samoan bilingual unit, and mainstream classrooms which cater for immigrant and deaf children. Suggestions for educational policy, teacher development and research are made.
Based on a huge body of research in child language and communication development, Children's Communication Skills uses a clear format to set out the key stages of communication development in babies and young children. Its aim is to increase awareness in professionals working with children of what constitutes human communication and what communication skills to expect at any given stage. Illustrated throughout with real-life examples, this informative text addresses: normal development of verbal and non-verbal communication skills the importance of play in developing these skills developmental communication problems bilingualism, cognition and early literacy development working with parents of children with communication difficulties. Features designed to make the book an easy source of reference include chapter summaries, age-specific skills tables, sections on warning signs that further help may be needed, and a glossary of key terms. It will be of great use to a wide range of professionals in training or working in health, education and social care.
Language, Children and Society: The Effect of Social Factors on Children Learning to Communicate investigates the processes involved in the development of communicative skills in young children, in particular as these unfold during the child's participation in social interactions in a variety of everyday, educational situations. For a fuller understanding of these processes, through which the child learns the vast array of communicative skills necessary to function effectively in social contexts, the broad range of situations in which the communicative exchanges are embedded—school, home, community, etc.—are examined. Comprised of 17 chapters, this volume begins by painting a vivid picture of human discrimination and prejudice that touches every child involved in the education process in the United States, a result that can be linked to language ignorance. The discussion then turns to some of the contributions of linguistics to education and some of the problems involved in reaching greater cooperation between linguists and educators. The relevance of developments in sociolinguistics to the study of language learning and early education is emphasized. Subsequent chapters focus on the communicative competence of kindergarten children; children's situational variation and situational competence; sex differences in the language of children and parents; and dialogue, monologue, and egocentric speech by children in nursery schools. This book will be of interest to teachers and students, as well as to practitioners in the fields of educational psychology, psychobiology, psychiatry, linguistics, and childhood education.
Learning to talk is probably the greatest milestone in a child's development: a deeply moving and often hilarious experience for all parents. In this charming and informative book, Britain's leading expert on the English language talks you through every stage in your child's language development. Over thirty years after its original publication, this new and updated edition of Listen to your Child shows us that while the world our children are growing up in may have changed, one thing has not: parents still need to listen. Gathering decades of research from psychologists and linguists, Professor Crystal shows how the more we know about language acquisition - from 'cooking' and 'babbling' to melodic 'scribble talk' and simple words and then to incessant chatter - the more there is to delight in. From birth to the early school years, Listen to your Child provides a painless introduction to the study of child language acquisition as well as invaluable advice for parents.
Children with Down syndrome have significant delays in speech and language skills which will affect their progress during their primary school years. This module provides guidelines for the assessment of vocabulary, grammar, speech sound production and interactive communication skills, and activities to progress children's skills across all of these areas. The authors emphasise the importance of improving the quality and quantity of everyday communication experience for children with Down syndrome and the equally essential need to work on targeted activities for both speech and language skills. The majority of speech and language targets can be incorporated into the regular curriculum and daily activities in the classroom. This module follows on from Speech and language development for individuals with Down syndrome - An overview DSii-03-01] which should be read first, to provide the reader with an adequate understanding of speech and language development to be successful in using this programme.

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