"China", Napoleon once remarked, "is a sleeping lion. Let her sleep, for when she wakes she will shake the world." In 2014, President Xi Jinping triumphantly declared the lion had awakened. Under his leadership, China is pursuing a dream to restore its historical position as the dominant power in Asia. From the Mekong River Basin to the Central Asian steppe, China is flexing its economic muscles for strategic ends. By setting up new regional financial institutions, Beijing is challenging the post-World War II order established under the watchful eye of Washington. And by funding and building roads, railways, ports and power lines—a New Silk Road across Eurasia and through the South China Sea and Indian Ocean—China aims to draw its neighbours ever tighter into its embrace. Combining a geopolitical overview with on-the-ground reportage from a dozen countries, China’s Asian Dream offers a fresh perspective on the rise of China’ and asks: what does it means for the future of Asia?
This balanced and deeply informed book provides a comprehensive account of China’s Asia policy since the Cold War. Reframing the international relations of Asia in a thought-provoking and informed manner, Lowell Dittmer presents a panoramic view of the dynamics at work on all sides of China.
Proceedings from the conference "China and Asia: Towards a New Regional Order," convened in December 2003 at The George Washington University"--Acknowledgments.
Seeks To Help A Through Understand Understanding Of China`S India Policy Through An Inquiry Into China`S South Asia Vision-Takes Note Of Improvement In Indo-China Relations And The Recent Pro-India Tilt In China`S South Asia Policy.
The 21st Century Maritime Silk Road (MSR) can be considered as the most significant strategic outreach by China. It stretches across the large oceanic geography comprising the Western Pacific, the Indian Ocean, the Mediterranean and the North-Western Atlantic. The initiative, founded on historic recall, aims to build a flourishing multi-sectoral maritime economic network across the entire region with land corridors connecting to the terrestrial Silk Road Economic Belt (SREB). It is premised on monetary integration, infrastructure development, connectivity and, people-to-people contacts. It is also an accepted fact that such a vast enterprise would have politics and security as attendant factors. This book examines the broader strategic threads that are at play in this grand and ambitious trans-regional initiative unveiled by China.
An in-depth analysis of how India, China and other South Asian countries can cooperate on key challenges affecting their bilateral relationships This book focuses on identifying the extant barriers and impending opportunities for effective coordination of transport infrastructure and enhancement of trade activities along the border regions of South Asian countries. It asserts that with pertinent policy guidelines and timely initiatives from the participating countries, unprecedented opportunities can be capitalized upon for consolidated economic growth of the region. It exposes how untapped resources, bureaucratic and political inertia and a lack of collective endeavour remain major impediments to bilateral and multilateral cooperation which, if surmounted, could pave the way for successful regional initiatives. It will be indispensable to researchers and scholars of international relations, South Asia studies, international trade, comparative politics, political economy, and to the informed general reader.
This book is a result of years of China watching by a scholar who has developed great insight into the minds and methods of ruling elite of China while working as advisor to Radio Beijing. He would prefer rise of Asia with the rise of Chindia but signs are to the contrary.
Blending fine-grained case studies with overarching theory, this book seeks both to integrate Southeast Asia into world history and to rethink much of Eurasia's premodern past. It argues that Southeast Asia, Europe, Japan, China, and South Asia all embodied idiosyncratic versions of a Eurasian-wide pattern whereby local isolates cohered to form ever larger, more stable, more complex political and cultural systems. With accelerating force, climatic, commercial, and military stimuli joined to produce patterns of linear-cum-cyclic construction that became remarkably synchronized even between regions that had no contact with one another. Yet this study also distinguishes between two zones of integration, one where indigenous groups remained in control and a second where agency gravitated to external conquest elites. Here, then, is a fundamentally original view of Eurasia during a 1,000-year period that speaks to both historians of individual regions and those interested in global trends.
Bringing together a range of South Asian perspectives on rising China in a comparative framework, an attempt has been made, for the first time, to identify and examine the political, economic and socio-cultural stakeholders and constituencies that influence the respective policy of individual South Asian countries towards China. The essays also project how their mutual relations are likely to be shaped by these. The book is especially relevant today owing to China’s growing weight in Asian and global affairs.
It is difficult to overstate the growing importance of China and Asia in the global economy. Despite the sharp downturn experienced in the 1997 financial crisis, China and Asia have bounced back strongly in the new millennium and delivered solid economic growth. In this book, Ying-Wong Cheung and Kar-Yiu Wong have gathered together 35 renowned researchers from four continents to examine contemporary issues on the economic and financial interactions with a focus on China and Asia. Four broad areas are discussed. The first part deals with China and her interactions with other economies, the second with economic interactions within the region, the third with foreign exchange rate issues facing Asian economies, and the fourth with financial market development in the region. Within these chapters, some interesting results are explained, many of which differ from what is commonly believed. For example it is explained how exports from China and other Asian economies follow the "flying geese’ pattern and that these economies can grow in harmony; that appreciating the Asian exchange rates would not have much impact on their current account surpluses; that financial liberalization in Thailand did not create the short-term debt problem, which is believed to a major cause of the 1997 financial crisis. It is also described how developments in the US have very strong influences on Asian economies and that Mainland China was a less important source of external shocks than is commonly held.
This book brings together a diverse range of responses to China's Marine Silk Road Initiative, which proposes to redraw the map of Asia, particularly South Asia. China’s 21st Century Maritime Silk Road Initiative (MSRI) is a massive scheme to connect wide swaths of East, Southeast, South, and West Asia through a dense web of interconnected hard and soft infrastructure involving ports, roads, logistics facilities, special industrial zones, and free trade and investment agreements. This book will be invaluable for students of Chinese foreign security and foreign economic policy, those interested in South Asia including Indian foreign security and economic policy as well as Indian relations with China, those attentive to international economic developments in East and South Asia, and those interested in the political and economic situation in specific MSRI participant countries such as Pakistan, Maldives, and Sri Lanka as well as their political and economic relations with China.
The book is a project of United Service Institution of India.
This book is the text of the Singapore Lecture delivered by Premier Zhu on 30 November 1999. The text is in both English and Chinese.
This edited volume offers diverse and comprehensive views of China's rise and its implications to the East Asian region and beyond. The economic growth of China, initially started in the late-1970s with domestic and rural reforms, has been increasingly driven by China's industrialization and integration into the regional and global markets. The growth and integration of China, however, has exposed China's closest neighbours and even more remote countries to its various (previously internal) problems, and the lagging political openness of China has often negatively impacted on cooperation with other countries in dealing with these problems (i.e. trans-border pollutions, epidemics, illegal migrations, organized crimes, financial management, etc.). This book integrates geopolitical and domestic political analysis of China with a broad set of transnational security issues, and includes a diversity of regional views. In doing so, it explores further than the dichotomous debate between the American realists and liberals, adding finesse to the often simplified discussions on how to deal with the rising China. This book will be of interest to students of Asian Politics, Security Studies and International Relations.
Examines the growing interdependence of Asia and the Middle East and compares Indian and Chinese involvement in the region in contrast to the legacy of European and American influence.
This book examines the Chinese version of soft power and explores its myriad implications for India and all of South Asia. It traces the origin of China’s engagement with South Asian states from historical, political, economic, and security perspectives in order to better understand the dynamics of its South Asia policy.
Asia and China made disproportionate contributions to the slowdown of global trade growth in 2015. China’s import growth slowed starkly, driven by both external and domestic factors, including a rebalancing of demand. Econometric results point to weak investment and rebalancing as the main causes of the import slowdown. Spillover effects from China’s rebalancing are estimated for some 60 countries using value-added trade data, and are found to be more negative on Asia and commodity exporters than others.
Based on research financed by the Ford Foundation this book brings together the work of scholars and experts from China and its Southern neighbors providing a detailed insight into China's relations with South Asia Nations. This ebook is also available within China: Making New Partnerships - A Rising China and its Neighbors.

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